Category Archives: Technology

Will your baby need to learn to drive?

“They’ll be driving soon,” a friend said recently when I sent him a photo of my two young sons. “Hoping car will do that,” I responded, only half-joking.

But if you think about it, we may not be so far from that scenario and insurers are among those saying sooner, rather than later for self-driving cars.

From across the pond, this:

“Babies born today may never have to take a driving test.”

Axa UK’s chief executive Amanda Blanc told The Telegraph that autonomous vehicles could be on the roads within 15 years.

In preparation Ms. Blanc said it is crucial for the insurance industry to build a framework for what happens in the event of a car accident that is caused by a computer, rather than a human.

“Driverless cars will not be able to take to the roads [without that],” she added.

Insurers know that new technology, particularly the rise of autonomous driving, will drive a big shift in liability claims and they are preparing accordingly.

For example, in our earlier post we reported that Allianz has already started building teams of engineers with experience in automotive and driverless technology.

The Trump administration is set to unveil revised self-driving guidelines within months, according to this Reuters report.

Despite advances in safety, the impact of collision/crash, particularly motor-related, is the main driver of liability loss activity in the United States, according to Allianz’s latest global claims review.

Check out the I.I.I. issues update Self-Driving Cars and Insurance.

How to protect crops and property from hail

Damage to vineyards following several years of severe hailstorms in the famed wine-growing region of Burgundy, France, is prompting greater prevention efforts.

London’s Daily Telegraph reports that producers are protecting their entire grape harvest with a cloud-seeding system—a hi-tech hail shield that is designed to modify storm clouds and suppress hail formation.

The system works by releasing tiny particles of silver iodide into the clouds where they stop the formation of hail stones, thereby reducing the risk of damage.

Cloud-seeding, or weather modification, has been used for many years in parts of the United States and Canada not just to suppress hail, but to enhance rainfall and snowfall in some cases. Insurers are involved in the research.

This makes sense. According to the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, hail causes approximately $1 billion in damage to crops and property annually.

A monster hailstorm that pounded Colorado’s Front Range on May 8 is on pace to be Colorado’s most expensive insured catastrophe, with an estimated preliminary insured loss of $1.4 billion, according to the Rocky Mountain Insurance Information Association.

For auto, home and business owners living in hail-prone areas, taking steps to minimize hail damage to property is essential.

The Insurance Institute for Business and Home Safety (IBHS), is continuing a major multi-year research study into hailstorms. IBHS resources on preventing property losses are available here.

Ransomware: Does Cyber Insurance Make Sense?

As organizations look to recover from the disruption caused by Friday’s massive global ransomware cyberattack, the value of cyber insurance, and other cybersecurity tools, just multiplied exponentially.

Security researchers at Kaspersky Lab recorded more than 45,000 attacks in 74 countries including the UK, Russia, Ukraine, India, China and Italy, the Guardian reports.

The UK’s National Health Service, French car manufacturer Renault, and Spain’s telecommunications giant Telefonica were among those hit by the so-called WannaCry ransomware, which locks up computer systems until the victims pay a ransom.

Cyber risk modeling firm Cyence estimates the average individual ransom cost from the attacks at $300, and the total economic costs from interruption to business at $4 billion, according to this Reuters report.

Kevin Kalinich, global head of Aon’s cyber risk practice, told Reuters:

“If you’re a hospital that turned away patients, if you’re a global delivery company that can’t send a package, or a telecom company in Spain, Russia or China, the financial statement impact from the business interruption is much larger than the $300 ransomware.”

Insurance coverage for ransomware (see earlier post), and other forms of extortion, is available under cyber insurance policies, or other types of policies that specifically cover cyber extortion.

An insured’s ransom payment following an attack is typically covered, subject to individual policy terms and conditions, according to this I.I.I. white paper.

Cyber policies also provide coverage for the costs of forensic investigation, restoring lost or corrupted data, legal expenses and business interruption.

Here are some of the considerations that go into the decision to purchase coverage.

Where To Go For Small Business Cybersecurity Advice

Small businesses are increasingly vulnerable to cyberattacks. A new website launched by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is aimed at helping small business owners be better prepared.

The site – ftc.gov/SmallBusiness – is a one-stop shop where small business owners can find information to protect themselves from scammers and hackers, as well as resources they can use if they are hit with a cyberattack.

Online FTC resources include a new Small Business Computer Security Basics guide with information to help companies protect their files and devices, train employees to think twice before sharing the business’s account information, and keep their wireless network protected, as well as how to respond to a data breach.

Specific information on ransomware and phishing schemes targeting small businesses is also provided.

According to the U.S. Small Business Administration, there are more than 28 million small businesses nationwide, employing nearly 57 million people.

Cyberattacks can be particularly damaging to small businesses, and many lack the resources that larger companies have to devote to cybersecurity.

For example, the percentage of spear-phishing attacks targeting small business rose from 18 percent to 43 percent between 2011 and 2015.

Insurance is one of the ways in which small businesses can protect themselves. See I.I.I. resources on cyber liability risks.

Small Business Insurance Is Going Digital

The way in which small business owners buy insurance is changing, as the number of ventures owned by Millennials/GenXers increases.

Up to 25 percent of total small business insurance premium could be digitally underwritten by 2020, Willis Towers Watson Securities reports.

“Small businesses are expected to grow an average of 6 percent annually through 2020, at which point over 60 percent of businesses are expected to be owned by Millennials/ GenXers who are much more likely to favor digital management of insurance coverages.”

Traditional insurers are embracing new technologies, both by creating proprietary platforms and partnering with small business insurance distribution focused start-ups.

Here are some recent examples of digital innovation in the $100 billion small business insurance market, via Willis Towers Watson Securities inaugural Quarterly InsurTech Briefing:

Whether a start-up or an established company, disruptions can devastate a business. Small business week is the perfect time to tune up your insurance coverage, the I.I.I. says.

North American Insurers Lead In Tech Spending

North American insurers lead the way in IT spending globally and will invest $73 billion in tech areas such as data analytics, cloud, and insurtech in 2017.

Digital Insurance reports that global IT spending by insurers is slated to reach $185 billion by the end of this year, according to the Celent “IT Spending in Insurance 2017” report.

After North America, insurer technology spending by region is as follows: Europe ($69 billion); Asia ($33 billion); Latin America ($5 billion); then a group of territories comprising Africa, the Middle East and Eastern Europe (around $5 billion collectively).

Three overarching trends – digitalization, data analytics, and legacy and ecosystem transformation – still dominate investment, Celent said.

“In a few markets globally, we have seen a slight reduction in IT spending this year. Generally, the more mature markets remain under pressure to demonstrate value through efficiency,” said senior vice president Jamie Macgregor.

Selfies And Life Insurance

Today’s selfie may already be posted on Instagram, but consider this: one day it could be part of your application for life insurance.

NerdWallet reports that several life insurers are testing technology that uses facial analytics and other data to estimate life expectancy.

The tech company in focus, Lapetus Solutions, says its product Chronos, would enable a customer to buy life insurance online in as little as 10 minutes without taking a life insurance medical exam.

NerdWallet explains that state regulatory approval would be required for an insurer to be able to use Chronos in the underwriting process. Once approved, here’s how it would work:

“You’d upload a selfie to the insurer online and answer health and other questions. The facial analytics technology would scan hundreds of points on your face and extract certain information, including your body mass index, physiological age (in layman’s terms, how old you look) and whether you’re aging faster or slower than your actual age.”

The facial analytics angle is just one example of how life insurers are exploring the use of data, statistical models, artificial intelligence and other innovative techniques in their business.

Time and testing will tell which new approaches prove effective, says Robert Kerzner, president and CEO of LIMRA: “This one may or may not meet the vetting process to make carriers comfortable.”

What do you think?

Check out I.I.I. facts and statistics on life insurance.

Insurers Invest In Artificial Intelligence

About two-thirds of insurers use artificial intelligence-based (AI) “virtual assistants” to handle some customer calls and use of the technology is expected to increase, according to a just-published Accenture survey.

Today’s I.I.I. Daily, via Bloomberg, reports that 85 percent of the executives surveyed by Accenture indicated that they would invest “significantly” in the technology over the next three years.

Insurance companies will spend on average $90 million on artificial-intelligence technologies by 2020, according to research from Tata Consultancy Services.

The Bloomberg article “Insurance Customers Need to Get Used To Talking To Machines” is timely.

A new global study by software company Pegasystems Inc reveals that while consumers are optimistic about the benefits of AI, they are also confused about what AI really does and have misplaced fears that inhibit them from fully embracing AI devices and services.

In the survey of 6,000 customers in six countries, Pegasystems found that only one in three (36 percent) of consumers are comfortable with businesses using AI to engage with them—even if this typically results in a better customer experience.

Digital Insurance reports: “The irony in many cases is that consumers may be surprised to learn they are already exposed to much more AI than they realize.”

Only 34 percent of respondents thought they had directly experienced AI. But when asked about the technologies in their lives, the survey found that 84 percent actually use at least one AI-powered service or device such as virtual home assistants, intelligent chatbots, or predictive product suggestions.

“When asked separately to identify AI-powered devices, only 41 percent knew Amazon’s Alexa and Google Home run on AI.”

Core Systems Transformation And The Future Of Insurance

Core Systems Transformation is the next evolutionary step toward sustainable excellence and future success for insurance businesses. The key to this shift is how the insurance industry adapts new technologies into its practices–and how insurers embrace its essential values at all levels of their corporate culture.

In a new thought leadership piece, I.I.I. CEO Sean Kevelighan offers a few insights that we hope will initiate a broader discussion on the subject.

“Many liken the adoption of automated and/or augmented intelligence to a “4th industrial revolution.” Uniform standards—Stevenson’s railroad gauges and Whitney’s use of interchangeable parts—helped to power the first industrial revolution. To bring about the next revolution, insurance must further develop and implement its own sets of industry standards to facilitate change and growth in all areas and at all organizational levels: from IT to underwriting to product to distribution and customer service.

Much in the same way leaders in the Fintech sector have leveraged new technologies (e.g., blockchain) with outstanding results, insurance needs to acquire the tools, practices and perspectives (expressed by one global business processor, Xchanging, as conforming around “standards in data, processes, hubs, service providers and technologies”) to maximize and streamline products and, indeed, every link in the insurance value-chain.”

From Making the Pieces Fit Together:  Pathways to Digital Insurance Business and Culture Transformation

Impact Of Collision/Crash Top Cause of Liability Loss In U.S.

Despite advances in safety, the impact of collision/crash, particularly motor-related, is the main driver of liability loss activity in the United States.

The impact of collision/crash accounted for close to half (42 percent) of the value of business liability claims in the U.S., according to the latest global claims review by Allianz Global Corporate & Specialty (AGCS).

New technology will drive a big shift in liability claims, AGCS warns. For example, the rise of autonomous driving presents new loss scenarios for insurers:

“A decline in car ownership in favor of motor fleets, car-sharing and driverless taxis could see insurers move away from providing millions of single annual motor insurance policies to drivers, instead providing large policies purchased by manufacturers, fleet owners and operators.”

The shift to product liability will require insurers to develop technical expertise and not rely on historic data and driver profiling for pricing. Allianz has already started building teams of engineers with experience in automotive and driverless technology.

(Read this Insuring California blog post for more insight on how driverless cars will change auto insurance.)

The growing “sharing economy” also raises new liability questions:

”A road traffic accident featuring an autonomous car share vehicle could involve the vehicle manufacturer, software provider and the fleet operator, as well as third parties involved in the accident. This would make liability harder to apportion and claims more complex to settle.”

AGCS Global Claims Review analyzes over 100,000 corporate liability insurance claims from more than 100 countries, with a total value of €8.85bn (US$9.3bn), paid by AGCS, and other insurers, between 2011 and 2016.

Over 80 percent of losses arise from these 10 causes:

See Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) information on litigiousness here.