Health & Safety


I.I.I.’s Jim Lynch brings us a timely reminder on why it’s important to buckle up:

I hate to write this: CBS newsman Bob Simon, who died February 11 in a Manhattan auto accident, was not wearing a seat belt, according to The New York Times.

Simon lately filled an elder statesman role on 60 Minutes, but his reporting career was one of globetrotting daredevilry. He covered America’s urban riots in 1968. He reported for six years from Vietnam and rode one of the last U.S. helicopters that left Saigon before the city fell in 1975. He was captured by Iraqi troops at the outset of the 1991 Persian Gulf War and was held prisoner for 40 days.

Simon died when the limousine in which he rode sideswiped a Mercedes in Manhattan, then hit a lane barrier.

Every death is a tragedy, an accidental death doubly so. Sadder still that a person who survived so much danger might well have survived this accident had he been wearing a seat belt. His driver had buckled up and survived; both of his legs were broken, as was an arm. The Mercedes driver was uninjured.

I.I.I.’s Facts and Statistics on highway safety points out that seatbelts saved more than 12,000 lives in 2012 and could have saved another 3,031, had everyone used them.

I ride in cabs and black cars fairly often and know it feels awkward to buckle up. The action seems to be a referendum against the driver, as if my action says I question the driver’s competence. And I feel weirdly invulnerable when I travel, as if tragedy can’t find me in the back seat.

Still, I always strap myself into the harness, and I wish Bob Simon had done so as well.

In 2011, 65 percent of New York taxi riders failed to buckle up, according to Taxi and Limousine Commission statistics reported in USA Today, vs. about 10 percent in private passenger vehicles. New York is one of 22 states that do not require cab riders to buckle up.

If you’re reading about the rising number of measles cases in California, you may also be thinking about pandemic risk.

First, let’s look at the status of measles cases and outbreaks in the United States.

The CDC notes that from January 1 to January 28, 2015, 84 people from 14 states were reported to have measles. Most of these cases are part of a large, ongoing outbreak linked to Disneyland in California.

On Friday (January 30, 2015), the California Department of Public Health released figures showing there are now 91 confirmed cases in the state. Of those, 58 infections have been linked to visits to Disneyland or contact with a sick person who went there.

At least six other U.S. states – Utah, Washington, Colorado, Oregon, Nebraska and Arizona—as well as Mexico have also recorded measles cases connected to Disneyland, according to this AP report.

What about last year?

The U.S. experienced a record number of measles cases during 2014, with 644 cases from 27 states reported. Many of the cases in the U.S. in 2014 were associated with cases brought in from the Philippines, which experienced a large measles outbreak, according to the CDC.

measles-cases-616px

Measles, which can be prevented by vaccine, is one of the most contagious of all infectious diseases. The virus is transmitted by direct contact with infectious droplets or by airborne spread when an infected person breathes, coughs, or sneezes.

Approximately 9 out of 10 susceptible persons with close contact to a measles patient will develop measles, the CDC reports.

This is an important point. A study published by Risk Management Solutions (RMS) last year compared the low transmissibility of Ebola (Ebola can only be transmitted through direct contact with bodily fluids), with other infectious diseases such as measles.

RMS noted that each person infected with measles can generate on average more than 10 additional cases in an unvaccinated environment.

What about mortality risk?

Measles is one of the leading causes of death among young children, the World Health Organization (WHO) says. In 2013, there were 145,700 measles deaths globally—about 400 deaths every day or 16 deaths every hour.

One or two out of every 1,000 children who become infected with measles will die from respiratory and neurologic complications, according to the CDC.

One dose of the Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR) vaccine is approximately 93 percent effective at preventing measles, CDC notes, while two doses are 97 percent effective. Measles vaccination resulted in a 75 percent drop in measles deaths between 2000 and 2013 worldwide, WHO reports.

A CDC-issued health advisory here provides guidance to healthcare providers nationwide on the multi-state measles outbreak.

The potentially devastating impact of the rapid and massive spread of infectious diseases was a risk underscored by respondents to the recently released World Economic Forum (WEF) Global Risks 2015 report.

This reflects the need for a higher level of preparedness for major pandemics at both the country and international levels, the WEF noted.

The I.I.I. has facts and statistics on mortality risks here.

As holiday shopping gets underway, several major retailers are opening even earlier this year offering the prospect of deep discounts and large crowds to an ever growing number of shoppers.

The National Retail Federation (NRF) notes that 140 million holiday shoppers are likely to take advantage of Thanksgiving weekend deals in stores and online.

Millennials are most eager to shop, with the NRF survey showing 8 in 10 (79.6 percent) of 18-24 year olds will or may shop over the weekend, the highest of any age group.

Much has been written about the risks of online shopping, but for those who still head to the stores, there are dangers there too.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reminds us that crowd related injuries can occur during special sales and promotional events. In 2008, a worker at Wal-Mart died after being trampled in a Black Friday stampede.

According to the aptly named blackfridaydeathcount.com, since 2006 there have been seven Black Friday-related fatalities and 90 injuries. As well as stampeding crowds, injuries have occurred as a result of altercations over TVs, road rage over parking spaces, shootings and distracted driving.

For employers and store owners OSHA offers comprehensive tips on how to create a safe shopping experience.

Crowd management planning should begin in advance of events likely to draw large crowds, and crowd management, pre-event setup, and emergency situation management should be part of event planning, OSHA says.

Tips include: hiring additional staff; having trained security or crowd management personnel on site; determining the number of workers needed in different locations to ensure the safety of an event; and preparing an emergency plan that addresses potential dangers facing workers including overcrowding, crowd crushing, being struck by the crowd, violent acts and fire.

For shoppers too, a personal safety and security plan is a good idea. The National Crime Prevention Council (NCPC) advises not to buy more than you can carry and to plan ahead by taking a friend with you or asking a store employee to help you carry packages to the car. Travelers offers some important tips here.

To all our readers, have a happy and safe Thanksgiving!

As you prepare to welcome a throng of Frozen Elsas and Olafs to your front door, you may not be thinking about insurance but we’re here to tell you, you’re covered.

The Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) points out that standard homeowners and renters insurance will provide coverage for the following:

Vandalism: In the event your home or your personal possessions are damaged by neighborhood tricksters, homeowners and renters insurance policies provide coverage for vandalism and malicious mischief. You are on your own, however, when it comes to removing the toilet paper from your front yard….

Fire: If a jack-o-lantern, or other decoration, goes up in flames and damages your property, your homeowners or renters policy will cover fire-related losses. And, should the blaze make your home uninhabitable, additional living expenses (ALE) coverage will pay for alternate accommodations, such as a hotel, while your home is being repaired.

Injuries: The liability portion of a homeowners or renters policy comes into play if a Halloween party guest, or a trick-or-treater is injured while at your house or apartment. These policies also include no-fault medical coverage so the injured person can file their claim directly with your insurer. And if Fido gets a little skittish from all the commotion and accidently nips a trick-or-treater your liability coverage includes damages or injuries caused by pets.

Have a safe and happy Halloween!

jackolantern_01

Construction workers, farmers and landscape workers take note: insect-related deaths are most likely in your line of work.

As reported by The Wall Street Journal’s The Numbers blog, a new report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) finds that insects, arachnids, and mites were involved in 83 fatal occupational injuries from 2003 to 2010.

During the course of the eight-year period, farmers and farm workers (20 fatalities), construction occupations (19 fatalities) and landscaping workers (17 fatalities) accounted for two-thirds of the deaths.

Bees were responsible for 52 workplace deaths – more than spiders, wasps and ants combined (25), The Numbers blog reports.

Most of the deaths (72 of the 83 total) were directly caused by an insect, including cases in which the worker was bitten or stung.

Another 11 deaths were indirectly caused by insects. These include cases where an insect distracted the worker while driving or caused the worker to fall from a height.

Anaphylactic shock, often associated with insect-related injuries, occurred in close to half the deaths, the BLS said.

By state, Texas saw the greatest number (21) of insect-related workplace deaths during the 8-year period, followed by Florida (8).

However, when it comes to non-fatal insect-related workplace injuries and illnesses with days away from work, four states: California, Florida, New York and Texas had more than 250 cases reported in all three years between 2008 and 2010.

As a percentage of all days-away-from-work cases in those large population states, though, insect-related cases were less than 1 percent of the total cases in any year.

Not surprisingly, these incidents tended to occur in the warmer months. Almost 94 percent of the cases occurred between April 1 and October 31. The largest number of deaths (17) occurred in September.

Check out National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) information on workplace safety and insects here.

Most of us have heard of distracted driving, but it appears cell phone use while walking – also known as distracted walking – is a growing danger.

More than 1,500 pedestrians were estimated to be treated in emergency rooms in 2010 for injuries related to using a cell phone while walking, according to a nationwide study by Ohio State University researchers.

The number of such injuries has more than doubled since 2005, even though the total number of pedestrian injuries dropped during that time, and researchers believe that the actual number of injured pedestrians is much higher than these results suggest.

Jack Nasar, co-author of the study and professor of city and regional planning at the Ohio State University, says:

If current trends continue, I wouldn’t be surprised if the number of injuries to pedestrians caused by cell phones doubles again between 2010 and 2015.

The role of cell phones in distracted driving injuries and deaths gets a lot of attention and rightly so, but we need to also consider the danger cell phone use poses to pedestrians.”

The study found that young people aged 16 to 25 were most likely to be injured as distracted pedestrians, and most were hurt while talking rather than texting.

Researchers examined data for seven years (from 2004 to 2010) involving injuries related to cell phone use for pedestrians in public areas (not at home).

A wide variety of injuries were reported including a 14-year-old boy who suffered chest and shoulder injuries after falling 6-8 feet off a bridge into a rock-strewn ditch while walking down a road talking on a cell phone.

The study appears in the August 2013 issue of the journal Accident Analysis and Prevention.

Claims Journal has more on this story.

Turns out using hands-free technologies to talk, text or send email while driving is not as safe as many people believe, according to a new study conducted by the University of Utah for the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.

The research found that as mental workload and distractions increase, reaction time slows, brain function is compromised, drivers scan the road less and miss visual cues, potentially resulting in drivers not seeing items right in front of them including stop signs and pedestrians.

The report notes:

The assumption that if the eyes were on the road and the hands were on the steering wheel then voice-based interactions would be safe appears to be unwarranted. Simply put, hands-free does not mean risk-free.”

Researchers measured brainwaves, eye movement and other metrics to assess what happens to drivers’ mental workload when they attempt to do multiple things at once.

The results were used to rate the levels of mental distraction drivers experience while performing each of the tasks. The levels of mental distraction are represented on a scale, as follows:

– Tasks such as listening to the radio ranked as a category “1” level of distraction or a minimal risk.

– Talking on a cell phone, both handheld and hands-free, resulted in a “2” or a moderate risk.

– Listening and responding to in-vehicle, voice-activated email features increased mental workload and distraction levels of the drivers to a “3” rating or one of extensive risk.

Professor David Strayer, lead author of the study, says:

These new, speech-based technologies in the car can overload the driver’s attention and impair their ability to drive safely. An unintended consequence of trying to make driving safer – by moving to speech-to-text in-vehicle systems – may actually overload the driver and make them less safe.”

More on this story from NPR.

Check out I.I.I. facts and statistics on highway safety.

People living in areas most contaminated by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP) disaster that occurred during Japan’s March 2011 earthquake and tsunami, have a higher risk of developing certain cancers, according to a report by the World Health Organization (WHO).

Around one-third of emergency workers are also estimated to have an increased risk of developing certain cancers, the report notes.

The WHO says the findings underline the need for long-term health monitoring of those who are at high risk.

Dr Maria Neira, WHO Director for Public Health and Environment, notes:

A breakdown of data, based on age, gender and proximity to the nuclear plant, does show a higher cancer risk for those located in the most contaminated parts. Outside these parts – even in locations inside Fukushima Prefecture – no observable increases in cancer incidence are expected.”

In addition to strengthening medical support and services, WHO says continued environmental monitoring, in particular of food and water supplies, backed by enforcement of existing regulations, is required to reduce potential radiation exposure in future.

As well as the direct health impact on the population, the WHO report notes that the psychosocial impact may have a consequence on health and well-being and that these should not be ignored as part of the overall response.

The first-ever analysis of the global health effects due to radiation exposure after the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster also points out that for the general population inside and outside of Japan, the predicted risks are low and no observable increases in cancer rates above baseline rates are anticipated.

The report is the result of a two-year WHO-led process of analysis of estimated doses and their potential health implications.

With Thanksgiving less than a week away many of us are busy with shopping and food preparations for the Thanksgiving Day feast.

While there are lots of ways to prepare turkey, it has become popular to deep-fry the Thanksgiving bird. As more amateur cooks attempt this method, people are at risk for fryer related fires and injuries.

According to State Farm claims data, more cooking fires occur on Thanksgiving than any other day of the year. In fact, grease and cooking-related claims more than double on Thanksgiving Day compared to an average day in November.

In an effort to reverse this trend State Farm last year teamed up with celebrity William Shatner to produce a short video that warns people about the dangers of improper turkey frying. The video went viral and as a result State Farm grease and cooking-related fire claims occurring on Thanksgiving Day were carved in half.

To get the safety message out in 2012, State Farm has launched a new version of the video called “Eat, Fry, Love: A Cautionary Remix” reminding us that you can get a “moister, tastier turkey” and be safe at the same time.

Here it is:

Food manufacturers are the target of a wave of new lawsuits filed by consumers who allege the companies are mislabeling their products and ingredients.

The New York Times reports that lawyers of Big Tobacco lawsuits searching for the next big payday are now taking aim against food manufacturers. Some 25 cases have been filed against industry players like ConAgra Foods, PepsiCo, Heinz, General Mills and Chobani.

According to the NYT article, the tobacco lawyers are moving particularly aggressively and seeking billions of dollars in damages. For example, they have asked a federal court in California to halt ConAgra’s sales of Pam cooking spray, Swiss Miss cocoa products and some Hunt’s canned tomatoes.

In response, the food companies say the suits are without merit, frivolous and being driven largely by the lawyers’ financial motivations.

The NYT writes that the lawyers are not the only ones who appear to be targeting the food industry. Recently, the Center for Science in the Public Interest has sued General Mills for using the term “natural” on its Nature Valley products.

A glance at the CSPI website reveals that Welch and Splenda Essentials are also facing deceptive health claims on their products.

It’s worth noting that Ferrero, the manufacturers of Nutella recently agreed to pay $3 million to settle a class action lawsuit over misleading advertising that claimed the chocolate-hazelnut spread was healthy.

In an earlier blog post, we noted the potential liability risk facing food manufacturers, advertising agencies and ingredient manufacturers to name a few from obesity-related tort actions.

But this new wave of lawsuits appears to be very specific. As the NYT says, the latest litigation
argues that food companies are violating specific rules about ingredients and labels and misleading consumers. This is why it’s so important that food companies comply with federal regulation.

Next Page »