Education


For many children and their parents Sesame Street is synonymous with childhood as characters like Big Bird, Elmo, Ernie and Bert deliver education and entertainment to the pre-school set.

So the launch of an early literacy education initiative for underserved children via a partnership between the Insurance Industry Charitable Foundation (IICF) and Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit educational organization, is a notable development.

The IICF has pledged $750,000 to Sesame Workshop over the next three years, to create a literacy skills program that helps parents and caregivers support young children’s development of conversation, reading and writing.

The program will launch in the fall of 2013 and will include video segments, downloadable materials and a dedicated section on the Sesamestreet.org website and mobile site.

This is the IICF’s largest single grant pledge to-date since the organization was established in 1994.

The initiative will target low income communities within IICF’s four regional divisions; Midwest, Northeast, Texas/Southeast, and the Western United States and will also engage volunteers in all of these regions.

William Ross, chief executive officer of the IICF, says:

It’s an honor and privilege to be working with the Sesame Workshop, an organization that is passionate about making an educational impact for children in the communities in which we work and serve. Through this program, we are hoping to create a meaningful difference by creating an impactful literacy foundation for the underserved children in this country.”

 

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month and while providing shelter and security for victims is often the first priority, helping them attain financial or economic security is just as important.

Financial security and access to resources is the number one predictor of whether domestic violence victims will stay in or leave an abusive relationship. And insurance is a key component of financial planning that helps survivors prepare for a better life, according to the Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.).

Loretta Worters, vice president, I.I.I. says:

The financial cost of leaving an abusive partner can be crushing. Once you decide to leave your partner, you may be solely responsible for providing for yourself and your family and insurance can play a critical role in gaining your financial freedom and self-sufficiency.”

To mark Domestic Violence Awareness Month, the I.I.I. suggests the following financial
strategies for anyone who is leaving or has left an abusive situation:

1. Secure your financial records: It’s essential to prevent identity theft or damage to your credit. Birth certificates, drivers licenses, passports, bank and credit card information needs to be kept with a trusted family member or friend, or in a bank safety deposit. It’s also a good idea to set up a P.O. Box to conceal all your important mail from your abuser.

2. Know where you stand financially: Knowledge is power, and it is critical that you understand where you stand financially. That means knowing your main sources of income, bank account balances, property owned and debts owed.

3. Build a financial safety net: Once you have a good idea of your financial picture, you are in a better position to plan your exit. Begin with estimating your income and expenses to see if the money you earn right now will allow you to meet your basic needs. Also, start a savings plan and create an emergency fund so you have a safety net if things get difficult financially once you leave.

4. Make necessary changes to your insurance plans: If you plan to take a car with you when you leave your abuser, you will need to get separate auto insurance coverage immediately. Also, when you move out of the house, it is likely you will be renting a place to live and will need to purchase a renters insurance policy. If a life insurance policy on your own life is payable to the abuser, and you own the policy, you have the right to change the beneficiary, and probably should.

5. Maintain good credit: Having a good credit report is going to be essential when it comes to starting your new life, as it can help you more easily rent an apartment, get a new credit card and get better rates on your insurance—it can even affect your ability to get a job. Take care of your current debts and avoid missing any payments. Obtain a copy of your credit report and monitor your credit often.

6. Seek assistance: If you are in a precarious financial situation, or have limited money management skills, it may be difficult to implement some of the steps mentioned above so it is important that you use all the assistance available. Local domestic violence programs, libraries, the Internet and faith-based organizations are all places that you can go to get assistance, and many offer free workshops and seminars that can help you with money management.

I’ll huff, and I’ll puff, and I’ll blow your house in. No, I’m not talking about the Three Little Pigs.

The Federal Alliance for Safe Homes (FLASH) is launching StormStruck®, a new 3D animated app from the USA Science and Engineering Festival in Washington, DC today.

This new app allows users to create an intense windstorm with a simple swipe of a finger and see in 3D the kind of damage it can do to an average home.

Users then choose from a variety of upgrades that protect the home and enable it to withstand damage. Everything from garage doors to roof connections can change the fate of the home and increase its chance of survival.

The aptly-named StormStruck app is free and compatible with the iPhone, iPad and iPod touch.

It is available now for download in the iTunes App Store.

Once you’ve seen how severe weather has the potential to damage your house, you might want to make a home inventory of your personal possessions. The good news is that the Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) has a new home inventory app for iPhone to make the process even easier.

The I.I.I.’s Know Your Stuff® – Home Inventory is Web-based software that can be found at KnowYourStuff.org. If you have an iPhone, you can also download the free Know Your Stuff® – Home Inventory app in the iTunes App Store.

Before you head off to enjoy the barbecues and fireworks, it’s time for our annual Independence Day fact file. Here’s this most American of holidays by the numbers, courtesy of the Census Bureau:

2.5 million: In July 1776, the estimated number of people living in the newly independent nation.

311.7 million: The nation’s estimated population on this July Fourth.

$98.3 billion: Dollar value of trade last year between the United States and the United Kingdom, making the British, our adversary in 1776, our sixth-leading trading partner today.

$190.7 million: The value of fireworks imported from China in 2010, representing the bulk of all U.S. fireworks imported ($197.3 million). U.S. exports of fireworks, by comparison, came to just $37.0 million in 2010, with Japan purchasing more than any other country ($6.3 million).

81 million: Number of Americans who said they have taken part in a barbecue during the previous year. It’s probably safe to assume a lot of these events took place on Independence Day.

Have a safe and happy holiday!

Preparing for hurricane season? Or for an invasion of zombies? Either way, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has you covered.

In a blog post earlier this week, the CDC did what many emergency preparedness messages fail to do – it got our attention:

There are all kinds of emergencies out there that we can prepare for. Take a zombie apocalypse for example. That’s right, I said z-o-m-b-i-e a-p-o-c-a-l-y-p-s-e. You may laugh now, but when it happens you’ll be happy you read this, and hey, maybe you’ll even learn a thing or two about how to prepare for a real emergency.”

The CDC went on to advise us to have an emergency kit on hand at home:

This includes things like water, food, and other supplies to get you through the first couple of days before you can locate a zombie-free refugee camp (or in the event of a natural disaster, it will buy you some time until you are able to make your way to an evacuation shelter or utility lines are restored).”

Once you’ve made your emergency kit, the CDC wisely suggests you sit down with your family and come up with an emergency plan. This includes where you would go and who you would call if zombies started appearing outside your door step. You can also implement this plan if there is a flood, earthquake, or other emergency.

While the Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) may not have tips for managing zombie risk, we do recommend you have an up-to-date home inventory to be prepared for any disaster. To help you create this inventory, check out our free online home inventory tool Know Your Stuff.

If you're    ready for a zombie apocalypse, then you're ready for any emergency.    emergency.cdc.gov

The problem of school bullying was the subject of a recent post here at Terms + Conditions. In it we noted that with increased access to and use of technology, cyberbullying is a growing concern.

An article in the New York Times over the weekend reports that as bullies go digital, parents are struggling to know the best way to respond. As the NYT states:

It is difficult enough to support one’s child through a siege of schoolyard bullying. But the lawlessness of the Internet, its potential for casual, breathtaking cruelty, and its capacity to cloak a bully’s identity all present slippery new challenges to this transitional generation of analog parents.”

According to the NYT, it’s not just about parents being technologically a step behind or failing to acknowledge the issue. Many struggle with how to supervise their children’s’ Internet activities, and how to proceed in the event their child is the victim of an attack.

Part of the problem is also that schools may be reluctant to get involved when the behavior occurs off-campus, and going the law enforcement route may involve a protracted process.

What about the legal environment? According to the Cyberbullying Research Center, at last count 44 states had laws regarding bullying, and 30 of those included some mention of electronic forms of harassment. Almost all of these laws direct school districts to have a bullying and harassment policy, though few delineate the actual content of such policies.

The Center advises educators, parents and law enforcement officers to carefully review and understand the statutes in their own state to understand the formal legal implications of participating in cyberbullying.

Check out the Center’s fact sheet on cyberbullying: identification, prevention and response.

Because Halloween falls on a Sunday this year the usual costume parties and trick-or-treating may extend over the weekend. While this makes for a fun time, it also means this Halloween has the potential to be particularly hazardous.

Luckily, insurers have some tips to help make the holiday a little less spooky:

Geico reports that with so many people enjoying the holiday, it’s necessary to be cautious whether trick-or-treating on foot or behind the wheel of your car. The U.S. Department of Transportation notes that the most dangerous time on Halloween for young pedestrians is between 4 and 8 p.m., prime trick-or-treating time. Geico urges drivers to watch for young children running in the streets, keep driving distractions such as cell phones out of reach, and to slow down.

The number of people in California hit by cars jumps 25 percent on Halloween vs. the rest of October, according to Allstate Insurance Co. The insurer asks Californians to keep their eyes on the road whether driving or on foot during Halloween. It offers the following three safety tips: don’t text and walk; don’t text and drive; don’t drink and drive.

Anyone hosting a Halloween party should take steps to limit their liquor liability and make sure they have the property insurance, according to the Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.). I.I.I. vice-president Loretta Worters notes that depending on the jurisdiction, violations of social host laws can lead to civil or criminal fines, imprisonment and monetary damages awards. So, if you’re throwing a party where alcohol is served, be a responsible host.

Have a safe and happy Halloween!

As many of you know, our mission at the Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) is to improve public understanding of insurance – what it does and how it works.

We’re constantly looking at new ways to demystify what can be a complex topic to a broad range of constituents. Social media tools can help us in that effort.

In addition to our two blogs (Terms + Conditions and Straight Talk), I.I.I. has a Facebook page and a YouTube channel, as well as numerous Twitter feeds (@iiiorg @Bob_Hartwig @JeanneSalvatore @LWorters @III_Research).

But this week the actuarial profession took us to a new level by showing how a catchy theme song and YouTube can work to powerful effect.

As of this morning, there have been more than 3,200 views of the What is An Actuary Song below.

(Hat tip to @reinsurancegirl for spreading the news via @Actpub)

Just imagine what “An insurer is your hero” theme tune could do to show the important role the insurance industry plays in taking risk.

 

The problem of school bullying has become a hot topic in recent weeks after a number of high profile cases of young people committing suicide after bullying incidents.

In 2007, about 32 percent of students ages 12-18 reported having been bullied at school during the school year, according to a school crime survey from the National Center for Education Statistics.

Bullying generally is defined as an attack or intimidation with the intention to cause fear, distress or harm by an individual or group usually repeated over time that involves an imbalance of power. The act of bullying can take various forms, including physical, verbal and psychological acts.

With increased access to and use of technology, cyberbullying is a growing concern. Cyberbullying has been defined as an aggressive, intentional act by an individual or group using electronic forms of contact, repeatedly over time against a victim who cannot easily defend him or herself.

The beginning of a new school year reminds us of the everyday risks that school-age children face and in turn the growing liability exposure facing parents and schools.

For example, a recent Chubb survey of parents of school-age children found that more than two-thirds (67 percent) agreed that today’s kids are exposed to more risks than they encountered during their own childhoods.

However, the same study revealed that parents tend to focus on severe but rare incidents, rather than everyday risks like bullying.

Some 38 percent ranked kidnapping/abduction as the “traditional” risk that concerns them the most, above car accidents (30 percent) and harassment/bullying (22 percent).

For technology-related hazards, parents listed online predators as the top threat (38 percent), followed by identity theft (25 percent), cyberbullying (18 percent) and sexting (14 percent).

It’s not just parents that are dealing with how to manage this risk. School districts increasingly are facing lawsuits due to their alleged failure to take action when notified of bullying incidents.

The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) notes that since 2001, more than half the states have enacted legislation to combat bullying. But NCSL also observes that state policies vary widely in how they address bullying.

A new student risk guide by Chubb offers tips on back-to-school safety and helps parents protect their kids against these risks.

The Public Entity Risk Institute (PERI) lists the numerous Web resources available for training and information on combating bullying and school violence.

I regularly tell friends there’s always an insurance angle, no matter the event. And so it is with Lindsay Lohan’s latest fall from grace.

As Lohan’s jail time continues to fuel the news headlines, our colleagues at the Insurance Information Network of California (IINC) remind us that we can learn from Lohan’s mistakes, at least from the insurance perspective.

As reported by Insurance Journal, IINC has determined the average insurance premium difference Lohan could pay for auto insurance because of her risky behavior based on her profile, ZIP code, vehicle model and current record of two DUIs and an at-fault car accident.

A single, 24-year-old female who lives in the Beverly Hills ZIP code of 90210 (Lohan lives in a condo in West Hollywood) and drives a 2009 Mercedes SL550 convertible would have access to 100 percent of the insurers offering auto coverage in California, according to IINC.

With a clean driving record, Lohan would pay approximately $2,075 every six months for a full coverage policy. But with an at-fault accident and two DUIs on her driving record, the six month premium would more than triple to $7,408.90.

That’s an annual premium of nearly $15,000.

Lohan would also only have access to less than 10 percent of the companies in California offering auto coverage, because most of the major insurers in the state would consider her too great a risk. IINC says it’s likely she would have to purchase coverage for bad drivers through the Department of Insurance.

I.I.I. research indicates the average American driver spends about $850 a year on auto insurance. The better your driving record, the lower your premium.

IINC’s Pete Moraga sums up the situation:

“If we take risks and make bad decisions, our insurance will be much more expensive.”

Check out this I.I.I. video offering five tips on saving money on auto insurance.

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