Category Archives: Highway Safety

A new report sheds light on increasing auto loss costs

In the second half of 2013 personal auto insurers began noticing an increase in auto collision losses. Crash rates had been falling for more than 25 years due to improvements in safety awareness, technology and enforcement, and the reasons for the sudden uptick were subject to much speculation.

In response, the Casualty Actuarial Society, the Society of Actuaries and the Property Casualty Insurers Association of America joined forces to analyze these trends.  The product is a paper containing some of the findings around collision frequency. Further analysis is being conducted on frequency trends for other coverages and for severity.

Findings include:

  • Increase in congestion, as measured by drivers per lane mile and commute times among others, positively correlates to collision frequency.
  • Mobile broadband access (used as a proxy for the likelihood that a driver may have a mobile device while driving) appears to have no impact on collision frequency.
  • The system (no-fault vs. tort) doesn’t appear to impact the expected collision frequency, but has a big impact on the variance of the frequency.

The group’s goal is to provide an analytical basis for discussing and understanding auto insurance loss cost drivers that ultimately affect premiums. Subsequent reports are expected to be released.

Source: Auto Loss Costs Trends Report, January 2018

How to be a responsible Super Bowl party host

Super Bowl Sunday is fast approaching and you may be planning a party to cheer on the Eagles or the Patriots.  If you’re serving alcohol you may want to familiarize yourself with social host liability laws in your state.

Auto accidents spike following Super Bowl games but they’re not all alcohol related.  A study conducted in 2003 by the University of Toronto found that fans of the losing team were much more likely to get into an accident than fans of the winning team. In the losing state the number of crashes increased 68 percent after the game, and only 6 percent in the winning state. Accidents climbed 46 percent in the “neutral” states.

Here are some helpful tips on how you can protect yourself and your guests:

  • Encourage guests to pick a designated driver who will refrain from drinking alcoholic beverages so that they can drive other guests home.
  • Limit your own alcohol intake as a responsible host/hostess, so that you will be better able to judge your guests’ sobriety.
  • Offer non-alcoholic beverages and always serve food. Eating and drinking plenty of water, or other non-alcoholic beverages, can help counter the effects of alcohol.
  • Do not pressure guests to drink or rush to refill their glasses when empty. And never serve alcohol to guests who are visibly intoxicated.
  • Stop serving liquor toward the end of the evening. Switch to coffee, tea and soft drinks.
  • If guests drink too much or seem too tired to drive home, call a cab, arrange a ride with a sober guest or have them sleep at your home.
  • Encourage all your guests to wear seatbelts as they drive home. Studies show that seatbelts save lives.

 

This I.I.I. article has more helpful suggestions about responsible social hosting.

 

 

Drivers, beware – perdiddle alert!

 

These are the longest nights of the year, so here’s a driving tip: check the headlights on your car.

This advice comes from my mechanic, who in the course of two weeks replaced the left headlight on both our vehicles. This is the season for headlights to burn out, he said – something about a wearing out of the bulb straining the filament, which then snaps when temperatures drop.

So take a second before you drive to turn on your headlights and walk around the car. You may find a perdiddle.

Click here for more winter driving tips from the I.I.I.

The Week in a Minute, 11/30/17

The III’s Michael Barry briefs our membership every week on key insurance related stories. Here are some highlights. 

 The I.I.I.’s James Lynch participated in Property Casualty Insurers Association of America’s Thursday, Nov. 30, satellite media tour on the dangers of marijuana-impaired drivers as states liberalize their marijuana laws.

The 2017 Atlantic hurricane season was the first one ever to feature three Category 4 storms making landfall on the U.S. mainland (Harvey in Texas, Irma in Florida) as well as a U.S. territory (Maria in Puerto Rick).

Twelve of 14 post-Hurricane Irma fatalities at The Rehabilitation Center of Hollywood Hills (Broward County) were deemed by the coroner to have been “homicides due to heat exposure.”

 

Americans’ Attitudes about Marijuana Use and Driver Safety Evolve with the Times. A Preview of I.I.I. Research Polling on the Subject

By James Ballot, Senior Advisor, Content Marketing

Americans’ attitudes about pot use have become more nuanced; 29 states and the District of Columbia (accounting for about 62 percent of the U.S. population in 2016) have passed laws legalizing the use of marijuana for medical or recreational use.

There are clear insurance issues to this trend. The Highway Loss Data Institute found that crash rates rose in states where recreational marijuana was legalized. The National Council on Compensation Insurance has a running conversation about how changes in the use of cannabis could affect workers compensation insurance.

While conducting research for a forthcoming I.I.I. poll, some interesting and unexpected trends emerged, including:

  • Most Americans know the legality of marijuana use where they live
  • A slight majority of Americans believe that driving while high results in more motor vehicle crashes

And yet…

  • Americans also voice greater tolerance of drivers who have used marijuana (compared to those who had consumed alcohol)
    • Respondents age 18 to 34 were more likely to say that they would ride in a car with a driver who has consumed marijuana (37 percent), followed by 34 percent of people between the ages of 35 and 44

We’ll release a report with polling results and our key learnings from the data in the near future. In the meantime, the conversation over safety issues related to legal medical and recreational cannabis will find larger, more mainstream audiences. To keep up with these and other discussions, be sure to follow @III_Research on Twitter.

 

New cars come with more driver distracting features than ever before

The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety has released a study which found that new model cars are more loaded with driver distracting technologies than ever before. The study concluded that 23 out of the 30 models tested had technology on board that demanded the driver pay a high or very high level of attention to it while the car was moving.

Programming navigation was the most distracting task, taking an average of 40 seconds for drivers to complete. When driving at 25 mph, a driver can travel the length of four football fields during the time it could take to enter a destination in navigation—all while distracted from the important task of driving. Programming navigation while driving was available in 12 of the 30 vehicle systems tested.

“Drivers want technology that is safe and easy to use, but many of the features added to infotainment systems today have resulted in overly complex and sometimes frustrating user experiences for drivers,” said Marshall Doney, AAA’s president and CEO.

The October issue of Latest Studies

The October issue of our Latest Studies digest is now available.

In this issue:

  • Wharton, The Congressional Budget Office and B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy all have recent reports on the National Flood Insurance Program
  • Lloyd’s of London on the future of cargo insurance
  • The latest on marijuana impaired driving from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • J.D. Power on U.S. homeowners insurance customer satisfaction

And more…..

Industry Groups Gather in Sacramento to Help Keep Teens Safe on the Road

Over 1,000 people die each year in crashes with teenage drivers during the ‘100 deadliest days’ of summer which span from Memorial day until students go back to school.

I.I.I.’s California representative Janet Ruiz reports in her blog on a media event that took place on July 20th where speakers from concerned groups including AAA, CDI, CHP, PCI and I.I.I. gave parents advice on how to keep teens safe on the road.

Long Road To Better Data On Drowsy, Drunk, Drugged And Distracted Driving

States are underreporting critical data from crash scenes that could make a big difference in efforts to prevent help prevent traffic fatalities and injuries.

A National Safety Council review of motor vehicle crash reports found that:

  • All 50 states lack fields or codes for law enforcement to record the level of driver fatigue at the time of a crash;
  • 26 state reports lack fields to capture texting;
  • 32 states lack fields to record hands-free cell phone use;
  • 32 states lack fields to identify specific types of drug use if drugs are detected, including marijuana.

States are also failing to capture teen driver restrictions (35 states), and the use of advanced driver assistance technologies (50 states) and of infotainment systems (47 states).

Excluding these fields limits the ability to effectively address these problems, NSC said.

“Collecting data from a crash scene may be seen as merely “filling out accident reports” for violation and insurance purposes. Data collection efforts immediately following a crash provide a unique opportunity to help guide prevention strategies. Currently, some states are recording this type of data and others are not. When data of this kind is requested to be reported on a crash report and is entered, prevention professionals will have the data to better understand driver and non-motorist behaviors. When this data is not recorded, prevention professionals are left guessing.”

The call for better data collection follows the release of NSC figures showing that in 2016 there were more than 40,000 traffic fatalities in the U.S. for the first time in 10 years.

A recent I.I.I. white paper found that in the past two years, both the accident rate and the size of insurance claims have climbed dramatically. These are the largest and most volatile components of auto insurance.

Check out additional I.I.I. facts and statistics on highway safety.