Archive for July, 2014

Global fatalities from acts of terrorism jumped by 30 percent in the last year even as the number of attacks decreased, according to a new interactive mapping platform from risk analytics firm Maplecroft.

Some 18,668 terrorism fatalities were recorded in the 12 months prior to July 1, up 29.3 percent from an annual average of 14,433 for the previous five years.

Over the same period there were some 9,471 global terrorism attacks at an average of 26 a day, down from a five-year average of 10,468. This indicates that terrorist methods have become increasingly deadly over the last year, Maplecroft said.

Nigeria recorded by far the highest number of fatalities per attack, with 146 reported attacks in the last year resulting in 3,477 fatalities – an average of 24 fatalities per attack (compared to 2 fatalities per attack in Iraq).

Iraq recorded the highest number of attacks, with 3,158 acts of terrorism resulting in 5,929 fatalities.

China, Egypt, Kenya and Libya are seeing the most significant increases in the risks of terrorist attacks, the Maplecroft Terrorism and Security Dashboard (MTSD) reveals.

The MTSD classifies 12 countries as ‘extreme risk,’ including: Iraq (most at risk), Afghanistan (2nd), Pakistan (3rd), Somalia (4th), Yemen (6th), Syria (7th), Lebanon (9th) and Libya (10th). Many of these countries are blighted by high levels of instability and weak governance, Maplecroft notes.

However, of particular concern for investors, the important growth economies of Nigeria (5th), the Philippines (8th), Colombia (11th) and Kenya (12th) also feature in the category.

Jordan Perry, a principal political risk analyst at Maplecroft says:

Libya, Kenya and Egypt are among a handful of countries to witness a significant increase in risk in the MTSD and investor confidence in key sectors, including tourism and oil and gas, has been hurt. When faced with rising security costs and decreasing safety for their personnel, companies can, and do, reconsider their country-level commitments.”

The MTSD logs, analyzes and plots all reported incidents of terrorism, piracy, political violence and human rights abuses by security forces down to 100m² worldwide. It also draws on Maplecroft’s seven years of global data to reveal terrorism and security trends across 197 countries.

Maplecroft CEO Alyson Warhurst makes the important point that the dynamic nature of terrorism means individual events are impossible to predict, but the information included in the MTSD can help organizations make informed decisions relating to market entry, security measures for in-country operations, duty of care obligations, supply chain continuity and risk pricing.

Check out I.I.I. facts and stats on terrorism risk.

No industry sector is immune from cyber threats, and a round-up of recent headlines and reports underscores the increasing risk and cost businesses face.

Just this week, U.S. Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew urged financial institutions and firms to redouble their efforts against cyber threats and said information-sharing and collaboration among businesses and with government is key.

Speaking at a conference in New York, Secretary Lew noted that the consequences of cyber incidents are serious and our cyber defenses are not yet where they need to be:

Far too many hedge funds, asset managers, insurance providers, exchanges, financial market utilities, and banks should and could be doing more. In particular, it is imperative that firms collaborate with government agencies and with other firms. Disclosing security breaches is often perceived as something that could harm a firm’s reputation. This has made many businesses reluctant to reveal information about cyber incidents. But this reluctance has to be put aside.”

Secretary Lew noted that some banks are already spending as much as $250 million a year to strengthen their cyber security. (Note: this is a cost borne by businesses).

Meanwhile, a new report from the New York attorney general’s office revealed that the number of reported data security breaches in the state more than tripled between 2006 and 2013, with some 22.8 million personal records of New Yorkers exposed in nearly 5,000 data breaches.

The cost to the public and private sectors in New York? In 2013 alone, upward of $1.37 billion, according to the report’s findings.

The Insurance Information Institute’s (I.I.I.) newly updated report Cyber Risks: The Growing Threat (of which I am a co-author) sheds light on the specialist cyber insurance policies developed by insurers to help businesses and individuals protect themselves from the cyber threat.

Market intelligence suggests that the types of specialized cyber coverage being offered by insurers are expanding rapidly in response to this fast-growing market need.

I.I.I. facts and stats on identity theft and cyber security are available here.

Commercial insurance rates in the United States slipped to plus 2 percent in June 2014 from plus 3 percent in May, according to latest analysis from online insurance exchange MarketScout.

Richard Kerr, CEO of MarketScout, said:

The commercial market continues to adjust downward as a result of improved underwriting results and an abundance of capacity. In the aggregate, rates are still up slightly but the trend for rate moderation continues.”

By coverage class, umbrella, workers’ compensation, D&O, and EPLI all moderated from the prior month with each registering a plus 1 percent rate increase.

Workers’ compensation rates slipped the most from plus 3 percent in May to plus 1 percent in June.

By account size, small (up to $25,000) and medium accounts ($25,001 up to $250,000) remained at plus 3 percent. Large accounts ($250,001 to $1 million) slipped from plus 2 percent to plus 1 percent and jumbo accounts (over $1 million) were up 0 percent or flat.

Kerr noted that this is the first plus 0 percent measurement since the market turned towards rate increases in November 2011:

It’s not surprising the jumbo accounts have gone flat as the name brand account continues to allure underwriters despite the lower ROE. There is a pricing benefit to being a name brand, Fortune 1000 insurance buyer.”

By industry class, manufacturing, transportation and energy all adjusted their month-over-month rate increases downward by 1 percent.

Check out latest information from the I.I.I. on financial results and market conditions.

Some 6.5 million U.S. homes with a total reconstruction value of nearly $1.5 trillion are at risk of damage from hurricane-driven storm surge, and more than $986 billion of that risk is concentrated in 15 metro areas, according to an annual report by CoreLogic.

The 2014 analysis by CoreLogic found that by state, Florida ranks number one for the number of homes at risk, with nearly 2.5 million homes and $490 billion in total projected reconstruction costs.

At the local level the New York metropolitan area (including northern New Jersey and Long Island) contains not only the most number of homes at risk for potential storm surge damage (687,412), but also the highest total reconstruction value of residential homes exposed, at more than $251 billion.

Ranked second among the major metropolitan areas at risk is Miami, Florida with 562,410 homes exposed and a total reconstruction value of $103.2 billion, followed by Tampa, Florida with 444,765 homes at risk and a total reconstruction value of $79.1 billion.

CoreLogic makes the point that just one storm of sufficient intensity occurring in or near one of the major metropolitan areas in the report is all that would be needed to cause tens of billions in property damage:

Past hurricane seasons have demonstrated the impact that just one storm of sufficient severity, located in exactly the wrong place, can achieve. Andrew, Katrina, and finally Sandy are still reminders that it takes no more than one hurricane roaring through a metropolitan and densely populated area to cause widespread property damage and threaten lives.”

CoreLogic goes on to explain that extensive regions along both the Gulf and Atlantic Coasts are vulnerable to storm surge, and yet many of the homeowners who live in these areas are not required to carry flood insurance because they are not located within a designated FEMA 100-year floodplain.

Since standard homeowners insurance excludes flood losses from either fresh or salt water, homeowners who are not located in FEMA Special Flood Hazard Areas, but are in high-risk surge zones, often do not consider buying National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) coverage for their properties.”

Sporting organizations around the world and their liability insurers have to be keeping a close eye on the latest developments in a multi-million dollar settlement which will see the National Football League (NFL) pay out an uncapped amount to compensate retired football players suffering from certain severe concussion-related neurological conditions.

A federal judge approved the preliminary revised settlement yesterday after the original $765 million settlement proposed by the NFL was rejected by U.S. District Court Judge Anita B. Brody in January over concerns that the amount would not be enough to cover the claims from more than 20,000 retired players over the 65-year life of the settlement.

Concerns have been growing over the risks of sports-related concussions in recent years since the filing of the first lawsuits by injured professional football players against the NFL in 2011.

Young people participating in a range of sports including soccer, basketball and ice hockey are also affected. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 173,285 sports- and recreation-related traumatic brain injuries (TBI), including concussions, among children and adolescents are treated in U.S. emergency rooms annually.

The New York Times reports that despite being uncapped, the new settlement does allow the NFL to contest an unlimited number of requests for awards by retired players as a way to prevent fraudulent claims.

Retired players will receive packets explaining the terms of the settlement over the coming weeks and players will be deemed to be in favor of the deal unless they opt out, which would preserve their legal rights, the NYT says. They can also object to parts of the deal.

A fairness hearing on the settlement is scheduled for November 19 in Philadelphia.

The settlement provides for a $75 million baseline assessment program that will offer all retired NFL players baseline neuropsychological and neurological evaluations to determine the existence and extent of any cognitive defects.

The 65-year monetary award fund will award cash to retired NFL players who already have a qualifying diagnosis or receive one in the future.

The court order details potential awards for qualifying diagnoses of up to $3.5 million for neurocognitive impairment, $3.5 million for Alzheimer’s Disease and Parkinson’s Disease, $5 million for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and $4 million for players who die with chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

The awards may be reduced based on a retired player’s age at the time of diagnosis, the number of NFL seasons played, and other offsets outlined in the settlement.

Business Insurance reports that the settlement approval notes that players who receive awards from the NFL fund are not required to release claims against the NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) or any other amateur football organizations for concussion claims.

A 2013 article by then National Underwriter reporter Chad Hemenway provides invaluable insight into sports-related traumatic brain injuries and how the legal fallout may change the way sports are insured.

Check out I.I.I. facts and stats on sports injuries.