Why year-round storm preparations are key

From Dr. Jeff Masters at Wunderground’s Cat 6 blog:

“Tropical Storm Emily was making landfall just south of Tampa Bay, Florida late Monday morning after spinning into life on Monday morning at 8 am EDT just off the Gulf Coast of Florida.”

And:

“Emily formed so quickly and unexpectedly that the Hurricane Hunters never flew into the storm. It is very unusual for a named storm to make landfall in the U.S. without the Hurricane Hunters ever sampling the storm.”

Emily is expected to move inland this afternoon and across central Florida tonight.

A good example of why preparation for tropical storms, hurricanes and other severe weather needs to be a year-round priority.

Check out FEMA’s https://www.ready.gov

At 11:45 a.m. EDT (1545 UTC) NOAA’s GOES-East satellite captured a visible image of Emily:

Why are securities class action filings at record high?

Federal class action securities fraud filings hit a record pace in the first half of 2017 and are on track for a year-end total that hasn’t been seen since 2001.

From Cornerstone Research and the Stanford Law School Securities Class Action Clearinghouse:

“Over the past six months, plaintiffs initiated 226 securities fraud class actions in federal court, more than in any equivalent period since enactment of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (PSLRA).”

The first half of 2017 saw 4.7 percent of U.S. exchange-listed companies sued in federal securities class actions:

“If activity continues at the same pace, 9.5 percent of exchange-listed companies will be the subject of filings in 2017—the highest annual rate since 1997.”

Pharmaceutical firms were the most common targets of filings, according to the report.

A significant factor in the record number of filings? The continued upsurge in merger objection lawsuit filings. The D&O Diary has more on this trend.

Both traditional and M&A-related filings were at record levels. Traditional filings increased from 95 in the second half of 2016 to 131 in the first half of 2017. At the same time, M&A-related filings rose from 57 to 95.

“London Calling…”

I.I.I.’s James Ballot, Senior Director of Marketing and Content Strategy, contributes these highlights from the IIS Global Forum 2017.

Established millennia ago and since visited continually by perils ranging from fire, flood, pestilence, civil unrest and wave upon wave of attacking foreign enemies, it’s no great stretch to call London the de-facto global headquarters of resilience. So it’s fitting that London should host this year’s International Insurance Society’s (IIS) Global Insurance Forum (GIF), given that the event’s focus was set squarely on Global Resilience and the Role of Insurance.

At the Forum more than 500 delegates and other attendees gathered to set a truly global agenda for how insurance and other parties–NGOs, policymakers, businesses, educational institutions, the media, among others—will respond to challenges ranging from political instability to cyberthreats to the need to create the right talent infrastructure to master the technological changes presently shaping our industry to innovating ways to address threats posed by intensifying natural catastrophe cycles.

Among the highlights:

  • A video address from HRH The Prince of Wales to open the Day 3 Insurance Development Forum (IDF) in which he outlines four key areas where insurance can assume leadership in fostering resilience.
  • Wide-ranging discussions of the “insurance gap” and how narrowing it is essential to building financial resilience against cyberattacks, as well as mitigating uninsured natural catastrophe losses among vulnerable populations in developing nations.
  • The Nature Conservancy, a top-line partner at this year’s GIF, introduced an innovative insurance product underwritten by Swiss Re that insures coral reefs and other natural coastal fortifications.
  • Insurtech and emerging innovations are changing the business—mostly by creating a climate in which, as one insurance fund capital manager asserted, insurance and tech startups can partner to help make “yesterday’s risks insurable today.”

A lot to cover in a single posting, to be sure. For a deeper dive into the goings-on at IIS Global Forum, Asia Insurance Review (AIR) offers gavel-to-gavel coverage of the event, as well as valuable insights from Forum participants.

 

 

Autonomous ships are coming

You’ve heard about self-driving cars, but what about autonomous ships?

Fortune Tech reports that the world’s first autonomous cargo ship, to be christened the Yara Birkeland is expected to start sailing in 2018, initially delivering fertilizer along a 37-mile route in southern Norway.

“The ship, according to the Wall Street Journal, will cost $25 million, about three times as much as a conventional ship of similar size, but will save up to 90% in annual operating costs by eliminating both fuel and crew.”

Analysis by Allianz Global Corporate & Specialty (AGCS) shows that human error accounts for approximately 75 percent of the value of almost 15,000 marine liability insurance claims studied over five years, equivalent to over $1.6 billion.

From the AGCS Safety & Shipping Review 2017:

“Autonomous vessels could improve maritime safety and revolutionize movement of cargo on a scale not seen since containerization.”

Check out Insurance Information Institute facts & statistics on marine accidents.

Industry Groups Gather in Sacramento to Help Keep Teens Safe on the Road

Over 1,000 people die each year in crashes with teenage drivers during the ‘100 deadliest days’ of summer which span from Memorial day until students go back to school.

I.I.I.’s California representative Janet Ruiz reports in her blog on a media event that took place on July 20th where speakers from concerned groups including AAA, CDI, CHP, PCI and I.I.I. gave parents advice on how to keep teens safe on the road.

Coastal resilience, or putting an insurance policy on nature

Our earlier post Working with nature to build resilience to hurricanes discussed how insurers look to natural infrastructure like coastal wetlands and mangrove swamps to mitigate storm losses.

The Mesoamerican Reef, which runs south for some 700 miles from the tip of the Yucatán Peninsula protects coastal communities and property by reducing  the force of storms, but its corals require continued repairs.

For every meter of height the reef loses, the potential economic damage from a major hurricane triples, according to The Nature Conservancy (TNC).

Now thanks to TNC and Swiss Re, the reef is about to get its own insurance policy.

From Bloomberg:

“After Hurricane Wilma struck in 2005, causing $7.5 billion of damage in Mexico, beachfront hotel owners began paying extra taxes to the state government to handle beach restoration and protect the reef.”

TNC has proposed a different approach:

“The extra money paid by the hotel owners to the government could be converted into premium payments to Swiss Re to cover the reef. The policy would be what’s called parametric insurance, in which a large hurricane would trigger near-immediate payouts. By having the money arrive quickly, reef repairs could begin sooner.”

From Artemis blog, via TNC:

“One of the most promising new developments to maximize the value of nature is the possibility of putting an insurance policy on habitats like reefs and beaches. By combining insurance and new science, we can protect and improving the health of reefs and beaches so they can continue to protect us.”

 

Cyber protection gap akin to nat cat

FedEx Corp has disclosed in a securities filing that its international delivery business, TNT Express BV, was significantly affected by the June 27 Petya cyberattack.

Apparently, the courier company did not have cyber insurance or any other insurance that would cover losses from Petya, according to this report by The Wall Street Journal, via the I.I.I. Daily.

A new emerging risk report from Lloyd’s and risk modeling firm Cyence notes that cyberattacks have the potential to trigger billions of dollars of insured losses, yet there is a massive underinsurance gap.

Take its first modeled scenario: a cloud service provider hack. The event produced a range of insured losses from $620 million for a large loss to $8.1 billion for an extreme loss (overall losses ranged from $4.6 billion to $53 billion).

This left an insurance protection gap of between $4 billion (large loss) and $45 billion (extreme loss), so between 87 percent and 83 percent of the overall losses respectively were uninsured.

In another modeled scenario, the mass vulnerability attack, the underinsurance gap is between $9 billion for a large loss and $26 billion for an extreme loss, meaning that just 7 percent of economic losses are covered by insurance.

From the report:

“In some ways, the cyber insurance market can be considered in the same light as underinsurance in the natural catastrophe space – risks are growing and insurance penetration figures are low.”

High rise fire risk in Asia

Insurance Information Institute research assistant Brent Carris authors today’s post:

In Gen Re’s Property Matters series, Tom Qiu reports that with the super high rise (SHR) construction rate growing each year, there is potential for large scale loss of life and significant property/casualty claims.

Per the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) Year in Review: Asia recorded 107 of the 128, or 84% of the completed high rise constructions for 2016. China alone, accounted for 84 (67%) of the global total.

Incidents like the Grenfell Tower fire this year in London (see our prior post) and Address Downtown hotel fire of 2015 in Dubai, remind us of the fire risk and resulting huge claims surrounding high rises.

In order to properly rate SHR buildings, underwriters must carefully assess technical survey reports along with visual inspections. In addition to underwriting risks, claims management can be very difficult due to the numerous types of policies involved in a SHR building fire.

Private market flood insurance is cheaper in many cases

Alongside the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), a thriving private flood insurance market would provide wider and in many cases cheaper coverage options, according to a new study.

Consulting firm Milliman, in partnership with risk modeler KatRisk, looked at three states – Florida, Texas, and Louisiana – which combined account for 56 percent of NFIP insurance policies in-force nationwide.

Its analysis compared modeled private flood insurance premiums to those of the NFIP.

Key findings:

  • Some 77 percent of single-family homes in Florida, 69 percent in Louisiana, and 92 percent in Texas could see cheaper premiums with private insurance than with the NFIP.
  • Of the homes modeled, 44 percent in Florida, 42 percent in Louisiana and 70 percent in Texas, could see premiums that are less than one-fifth that of the NFIP.
  • Conversely, private insurance would cost over twice the NFIP premiums for 14 percent of single-family homes in Florida, 21 percent in Louisiana and 5 percent in Texas.

prior post discussed how private carriers are dipping their toes in the flood insurance market.

Insurance industry employment by the numbers

Today’s Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) Daily reports that the U.S. Labor Department’s Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) just published data as of May 2017 on detailed insurance industry employment.

Updated multi-decade trend data in chart form is available at the I.I.I. website. The I.I.I. slides show employment trends for property/casualty, life/annuity, health insurers, and reinsurers, agents & brokers, independent claims adjusters, and third-party administrators.

In May 2017, on a year-over-year basis, employment in most segments of the insurance industry was up by varying degrees: P/C carrier employment rose by 11,200 (+2.0 percent) to 566,800.

Data for the last few months are preliminary and are often revised later, but revisions are usually small.