No single factor, rather a sequence of failures involving a number of different parties led to the Deepwater Horizon explosion and fire which killed 11 people and caused widespread pollution in the Gulf of Mexico earlier this year.

That’s the upshot of a report released by BP today based on a four-month internal investigation led by Mark Bly, BP’s head of safety and operations.

BP concludes that decisions made by “multiple companies and work teams” contributed to the spill which it says arose from “a complex and interlinked series of mechanical failures, human judgments, engineering design, operational implementation and team interfaces.”

Based on the findings of the report, BP says it is unlikely that the well design contributed to the incident. Check out BP’s report website for further info.

The Wall Street Journal notes that the BP report boils the investigation down to eight key findings, with BP accepting some responsibility for the disaster. The New York Times describes the report as a preview of BP’s probable legal strategy as it prepares to defend itself against possible federal charges, penalties and hundreds of pending lawsuits.

At the end of the report BP’s investigation team has proposed a total of 25 recommendations designed to prevent a recurrence of such an accident.

The recommendations are directed at strengthening assurance on blow-out preventers, well control, pressure-testing for well integrity, emergency systems, cement testing, rig audit and verification and personnel competence.

Check out our updated presentation on the Deepwater Horizon Disaster for a review of the insurance issues relating to the loss.