Regardless of the exact track of Tropical Storm Isaac the next few days, you can’t help but notice there’s an extremely large band of tropical storm force winds associated with it.

In its 8am EDT advisory on Isaac today, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) reported that Isaac was a little stronger and noted that tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 185 miles (295 km) from its center.

This graphic from the NHC shows the potential reach of those tropical storm force winds:

Florida, Texas, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana and Mississippi have some significant insured coastal property values, according to the Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.).

Figures compiled by catastrophe modeler AIR Worldwide show the total value of insured coastal exposure in these six states was $3.8 trillion in 2007. That’s slightly under half the $8.9 trillion value of insured coastal property in hurricane prone states as a whole.

But it’s not just coastal property that could feel Isaac’s effects. As Hurricane Irene demonstrated last year, the impact of a storm – winds, floods, and rains – can be felt far inland.

A post over at the Disaster Safety Blog (official blog of the Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety) observes that the 20th anniversary of Hurricane Andrew serves as a reminder that it only takes one storm to cause significant damage.

Even if Isaac doesn’t make hurricane status, there’s some useful information in I.I.I. hurricane fact files and market share by state.