As we mark the 11-year anniversary of September 11, a just-released study from the Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) finds that while the risk is changing, terrorism is an evolving and ongoing threat for the foreseeable future.

The paper notes that despite recent counterterrorism successes, including the killing of al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden, the threat from terrorism risk is far from insignificant.

Cyber-terrorism is one area of growing concern for governments and businesses around the world, according to the I.I.I.

It says recent high profile attacks, such as the sabotaging of Iran’s nuclear program via the Stuxnet computer worm and malicious infiltration attempts by China, underscore the growing threat to both national security and the economy.

It goes on to cite a recent study by the Ponemon Institute in collaboration with Bloomberg Government, that estimated private sector spending on cyber security at roughly $80 billion in 2011, but noted this was not nearly enough.

The Ponemon study found that “utilities, banks and phone carriers would have to spend almost nine times more on cybersecurity to prevent a digital Pearl Harbor from plunging millions into darkness, paralyzing the financial system or cutting communications,” according to a report by Bloomberg News.

The findings were based on interviews with technology managers from 172 U.S. organizations in six industries and government.

More I.I.I. facts and statistics on terrorism risk here.