The arrival of the first major winter storm of 2014 just two days into the new year makes this a good time to take stock of the insurance implications.

The Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) reports
 that winter storms are historically very expensive and are the third-largest cause of catastrophe losses, behind only hurricanes and tornadoes.

From 1993 to 2012, winter storms resulted in about $27.8 billion in insured losses—or $1.4 billion per year, on average, according to Property Claims Service for Verisk Insurance Solutions (see chart below).

Dr. Robert Hartwig, president of the I.I.I. and an economist, notes:

The I.I.I. offers additional facts and statistics on winter storms here.

INFLATION-ADJUSTED U.S. INSURED CATASTROPHE LOSSES BY CAUSE OF LOSS, 1993-2012 (1)
(2012 $ billions)

INFLATION-ADJUSTED U.S. INSURED CATASTROPHE LOSSES BY CAUSE OF LOSS, 1993-2012 (1)

(1) Adjusted for inflation through 2012 by ISO using the GDP implicit price deflator. Excludes catastrophes causing direct losses less than $25 million in 1997 dollars. Excludes flood damage covered by the federally administered National Flood Insurance Program.
(2) Excludes snow.
(3) Includes wildland fires.
(4) Includes losses from civil disorders, water damage, utility service disruptions, and any workers compensation catastrophes generating losses in excess of PCS’s threshold after adjusting for inflation.

Source: The Property Claim Services (PCS) unit of ISO, a Verisk Analytics company.

As this blizzard passes, commentators note that arctic conditions are forecast to continue in its wake. Check out Eric Holthaus’ post at the Daily Beast for the latest.