Cigna: Obesity, Skin Cancer Growing Factor in Disability Claims

American businesses lose an average of 2.8 million work days each year due to unplanned absences, costing employers more than $74 billion, so it’s with interest that we read of a significant increase in absence due to obesity and skin cancer in a just released study by Cigna.

According to Cigna’s analysis of 20 years of short-term disability claims, claims related to obesity increased by 3,300 percent between 1993 and 2012.

In 1993, obesity ranked 173 out of 267 diagnostic drivers of absence, accounting for 0.04 percent of claims that year. By 2012, obesity had jumped 133 places to number 40 on the list, accounting for 0.70 percent of claims.

Hat tip to Business Insurance which reports on this story here.

Cigna also reports that new claims and absence related to skin cancer increased more than 300 percent in the 20-year period.

Between 1993 and 2012, skin cancer jumped from 91 to 27 on the list of diagnostic drivers of absence, and its share of claims had increased to 0.9 percent in 2012, up from 0.2 percent in 1993.

The analysis also shows a 45 percent increase in work absence due to the surgical treatment of herniated discs, the most significant increase in short-term disability claims among sedentary occupations over the 1993 to 2012 period.

Cigna notes that the most frequently approved short-term disability claims both 20 years ago and today, remain musculoskeletal disorders, which make up 25 percent of all non-maternity absence.

In a press release, Dr Robert Anfield, chief medical officer for Cigna’s disability insurance unit says:

The aging workforce and a trend towards growing waistlines has made some medical conditions more dominant factors for short-term disabilities than they were 20 years ago. For example, arthritis and tendonitis-related absences have both increased more than 50 percent since 1993.” 

However, the study found significant changes in short-term disability rates for obesity, cancer, depression and herniated discs that uncover the impact of medical advances on absence and productivity.

Check out I.I.I. facts and statistics on disability.

Check out an I.I.I. study on obesity, liability and insurance here.

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