Terrorism Risk Insurance: An Uncertain Future

It’s Election Day and as you head to the polls the insurance issue that remains at the top of mind for most is the future of the Terrorism Risk Insurance Act (TRIA).

In a new paper the Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) says the question of what happens if the federal act is not renewed by Congress is no longer a theoretical one:

Since insurance policies negotiated during 2014 extend beyond the imminent December 31 expiration date of the program, the negative consequences of non-renewal are already being experienced by businesses across America and their insurers.”

The private sector simply does not have the capacity to provide insurance or reinsurance for terrorism risk to the extent currently provided by the federal program, the I.I.I. says. As a result, in the absence of the act, terrorism risk insurance would be less available and less affordable.

Over at WGA InsureBlog, David Bardelli, senior vice president and casualty practice leader for William Gallagher Associates, notes that with Congress not back in session until mid-November, the clock is ticking for lawmakers to come up with a solution before the end of the year.

Bardelli writes:

A lame duck Congressional session could pass an extension, which has been the case with previous versions of the bill. With House Democrats and Republicans at odds over the latest version of the House Committee’s proposal, it looks like the November elections will have the biggest impact on what happens with TRIA.”

Insurers are not alone in their concerns over the future of terrorism risk insurance. Just on Friday, the Real Estate Roundtable reported that while senior commercial real estate executives see a continuing recovery in the markets, they remain concerned about the lack of clear direction in many federal policies, primarily terrorism risk insurance.

Roundtable President and CEO Jeffrey D. DeBoer, said:

Without a long-term reauthorization of TRIA when policymakers return in November, financing for CRE projects will be directly threatened, job creation will suffer as it did after 9-11, and businesses can expect a general slowdown as many financing contracts will be found to be in technical default without terrorism insurance.”

Congress will return November 12 for the “lame duck” session.

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