A plan aimed at improving New York City’s environment has been unveiled by Mayor Michael Bloomberg. Among the proposals, the idea to charge an $8 congestion fee to drivers entering Manhattan at peak hours during the week. A series of cameras would capture license plates, either charging the car’s commuter account or generating a bill. Modeled after a similar congestion charge introduced across the pond in London in 2003, the plan may have significant implications for auto insurers and their policyholders. It’s easy to identify a few potential benefits right away. As the risk of auto accidents increases in areas of high traffic density, a reduction in the number of vehicles on the road could have a positive effect on auto claims. For drivers who decide to leave their car at home and take the train instead, the lower average miles per year driven could reduce the price they pay for auto insurance. What is not so certain and perhaps up for debate is how the new technology under such a scheme might intersect with the auto insurance underwriting process. What are your thoughts?