IoT and Insurers of Things

There’s a lot of buzz around the Internet of Things (IoT), not least with latest forecasts from Gartner suggesting that 20.8 billion connected things will be in use worldwide by 2020.

Already the estimated number of connected things in 2016–6.4 billion, according to Gartner–is a 30 percent increase on 2015. In fact 5.5 million new things will get connected every day in 2016, Gartner predicts.

A press release notes:

Aside from connected cars, consumer uses will continue to account for the greatest number of connected things, while enterprise will account for the largest spending.”

Gartner estimates that 4 billion connected things will be in use in the consumer sector in 2016, and will reach 13.5 billion in 2020. (Hat tip  Canadian Underwriter for its report here)

Numerous analysts have pointed to IoT’s power to transform the insurance industry.

In this Deloitte QuickLook blog post, Sam Friedman writes that IoT will likely accelerate the vast amounts of data available to insurers as Web-connected sensors become the norm.

For example, telematics for usage-based auto insurance can provide carriers with 24/7 updates about where, when and how fast an insured travels, as well as assessing their turning and braking habits, traffic navigation skills and response time.

This same IoT technology has applications in a number of other coverages in personal, life and health and commercial insurance, Friedman writes.

Another example  is “smart” homes which will allow homeowners to monitor their property, its security and elements like heating remotely. Insurers could provide loss control advice to minimize threats and perhaps take action to secure insured properties, he suggests.

And in this Accenture blog post, Daniele Presutti writes about how IoT will change how insurance is sold and who sells it. He predicts an increasing presence in the insurance business by tech-savvy competitors, such as Google and Amazon.

But it’s not all bad news, he writes:

As people, homes, organizations and even cities become increasingly interconnected, an array of new opportunities will emerge. Smart and agile insurance companies will be able to take advantage of the IoT to launch new products, with new customers and capture new markets. These companies will be the Insurers of Things. For them the possibilities will be huge.”

Read more about  how insurers are innovating along with the evolution of IoT in our latest paper Cyber Risks: Threat and Opportunities.

 

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