More On Employment and Claim Frequency

Earlier this month Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) chief actuary Jim Lynch linked teen employment to the spike in claim frequency. I.I.I. chief economist Steven Weisbart responds:

I think Jim’s post draws the wrong inference from the data. Specifically, the slide pairs the drop in the teenage unemployment rate with the rise in overall collision claim frequency. He infers that if teens are not unemployed, they’re employed and, presumably, driving to work.

But the drop in the unemployment rate of this age group isn’t solely—or even mainly—because they’ve taken jobs. To start with, in 2006-07, there were seven million people ages 16 to 19 in the labor force. That began falling in 2008, crossing six million in 2010 and plateauing at about 5.6 million midway through 2011. So in the space of less than five years, about 1.5 million people ages 16-19 disappeared from the labor force.

In contrast, the number unemployed in this age range dropped from about 1.1 million in 2006-07 to about 0.9 million in 2015. So about 200,000 got jobs. Some who had been in the labor force in 2006-07 must have gone to school, joined the military, were imprisoned, or simply gave up looking for a job (and therefore were not considered to be in the labor force).

If, instead, you look at the number in this age group who were employed in this period, it was 6 million in 2006-07, dropped to 4.3 million in mid-2010, rose to 4.5 million by mid-2014, and was 4.75 million in 2015:Q4. So the number of people in this age group who were employed is still 1.25 million below what it was before the Great Recession and subsequently.

I’ve put together a different slide (below), showing the change in employment and the change in claim frequency. As the number of employed falls with the Great Recession, so does claim frequency. And as employment numbers climb, so does claim frequency.

Employment and Collisions

So I’d say that Jim has a good explanation for the spike in the number of claims; more people get jobs, start driving to and from work and unfortunately get into accidents more often.

But it wasn’t just teen workers. It was everybody.

One thought on “More On Employment and Claim Frequency”

  1. This is an unrealistic statistical assumption. You are only basing this on one data point. You are assuming people are not driving if they are not employed.

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