Banner Health Breach: Are You Covered?

Up to 3.7 million payment card and patient medical records are reported to have been compromised in a cyber attack at Phoenix, Arizona-based healthcare provider Banner Health, underscoring the threat faced by the medical/healthcare sector.

Beginning June 17, the attack targeted Banner Health patients, health plan members, healthcare providers and retail customers.

On its website, Banner Health said it had discovered in early July that cyber attackers may have gained unauthorized access to computer systems targeting payment card data at food and beverage locations, including cardholder name, card number, expiration date and internal verification code.

In late July, Banner Health also discovered that patient information, health plan member and beneficiary information may have been compromised—including names, birthdates, addresses, physicians’ names, dates of service, claims information, and possibly health insurance information and social security numbers.

Physician and provider information may also have been compromised, including names, addresses, dates of birth, social security numbers and other identifiers.

As investigators look into the specifics of this breach, a glance at the numbers reveals that Banner Health will almost double the number of records compromised in U.S. data breaches targeting the medical/healthcare sector in 2016, per figures released by the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC).

As of August 2, 2016, some 206 data breach events, exposing just under 5 million records, had been tracked against the medical/healthcare sector, according to the ITRC. Make that 207 data breaches, exposing 8.7 million records.

With Banner Health, total data breach events year-to-date will also rise to at least 573 breaches, with 17.2 million records exposed. (This does not account for any other data breaches that may have occurred since August 2).

A recent Ponemon report wisely reminded us that “no healthcare organization, regardless of size, is immune from data breach.”

In the last two years, the average cost of a data breach for healthcare organizations was estimated at more than $2.2 million, according to Ponemon.

“Data breaches in healthcare are increasingly costly and frequent, and continue to put patient data at risk. Based on the results of this study, we estimate that data breaches could be costing the healthcare industry $6.2 billion.”

Criminal attacks are currently the leading cause of breaches in healthcare, Ponemon said. All the more reason for cyber insurance to be purchased, as the I.I.I. advises in this white paper.

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