Cybersecurity and the Presidential Election

Insurance leaders say the upcoming U.S. presidential election could impact a range of issues, including healthcare and international trade.

Cybersecurity is another insurance-related issue that next week’s election is likely to impact. Forrester even predicts that the new U.S. president will face a major cybercrisis within 100 days.

A new Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) white paper notes that governments are facing an unprecedented level of cyber attacks and threats with the potential to undermine national security and critical infrastructure.

The I.I.I. paper, Cyberrisk: Threat and Opportunity, also highlights rising concerns over how hacked information may be used to influence a political outcome:

“Hacks of both Democratic National Committee and Republican National Committee emails during an election year have raised concerns that groups are attempting to influence the outcome of the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign.”

Just last Friday U.S. government officials accused Russia of trying to interfere in the 2016 elections, including by hacking the DNC computers and other U.S. political organizations.

And on Tuesday Microsoft said the Russian hackers believed responsible for hacking the DNC computers had exploited previously undisclosed flaws in its Windows operation system and Adobe’s Flash software.

The Wall Street Journal reports that apparent Russian attempts to disrupt the U.S. election highlight more mundane risks as well as a new weapon in information wars: the disclosure of hacked information to influence policy or public perception.

Meanwhile, cybersecurity experts have warned that the election systems in the U.S. are vulnerable at the local, state and manufacturer level.

The mounting concerns have prompted the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to consider whether the U.S. voting systems should be classified as critical infrastructure.

Currently, there are 16 critical infrastructure sectors, such as the U.S. power grid and water supply, whose systems and networks are considered so vital to the U.S. that their incapacitation or destruction would have a debilitating effect on national security and public health or safety.

In fiscal year 2015, there were around 295 attacks on critical infrastructure control systems in the U.S., a 20 percent increase on the previous year, according to DHS figures cited in the I.I.I. paper.

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