Working with nature to build resilience to hurricanes

Strong buildings, levees and seawalls play an essential role in increasing resilience to floods and hurricanes, but insurers are also looking to natural infrastructure to mitigate storm losses.

As the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season officially begins, an ongoing effort by insurers, risk modelers, environmental groups and academics is focused on understanding how natural defenses like coastal wetlands and mangrove swamps can reduce the impact of storms.

A 2016 study led by researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz, the Nature Conservancy and the Wildlife Conservation Society, found that more than $625 million in property losses were prevented during Hurricane Sandy by coastal habitats in the Northeast.

Where wetlands remain, the average damage reduction from Sandy was greater than 10 percent. Researchers expect analysis of the effects of Hurricane Matthew will demonstrate the value of similar protections.

The study was conducted in association with Risk Management Solutions and Guy Carpenter, with funding from the Lloyd’s Tercentenary Research Foundation and additional support from the Science for Nature and People Partnership.

Business Insurance has more on this story here.

This is just one example of how reinsurers and insurers collaborate with different sectors to build resilience and mitigate storm damage.

For example, Swiss Re is working with the Nature Conservancy to explore the economics of nature-based coastal defenses.

I.I.I. CEO Sean Kevelighan writes about how the insurance industry collaborates with different groups to build resilience to natural disasters in this article on PC360.

Check out I.I.I. issues update Climate Change: Insurance Issues.

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