Tag Archives: Business Interruption

Preparing For The Next Ground Stop To Your Business With Insurance

If you were flying United Airlines Sunday night, chances are you may have been delayed.

A computer outage grounded all of United’s domestic flights for more than two hours, according to this NBC report, though the glitch affected only aircraft on the ground and did not impact international flights.

The ground stop was issued after the Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System, or ACARS, had issues with low bandwidth, NBC said.

This is not the first time that a computer glitch or system outage has affected United’s operations, or indeed those of other airlines.

Allianz warns that in today’s interconnected industrial world non-physical or non-damage causes of business interruption (BI) are becoming a much bigger issue.

Physical perils like fire and explosion and natural catastrophes are still the top causes of BI that businesses fear most, but preparing for non-damage perils is becoming increasingly critical.

This shift in BI risk means that intangible hazards, such as a cyber incident or interdependencies from global networks, can cause large revenue losses for companies without inflicting property damage.

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With this ever-expanding range of BI risks, it’s good to know insurers have you covered.

Several pertinent BI insurance coverages developed by insurers are outlined in the Allianz Risk Barometer 2017 report:

  • Non-Damage BI (NDBI) insuring loss of income and ongoing costs from interruption of business caused by situations where there is no physical damage to the insured, the supplier or customer and there is no BI claim to be made, this coverage indemnifies a business for lost revenue due to disruption
  • Data Driven (Cyber) BI insuring loss of income and ongoing costs from interruption of business due to unavailability of data and computer systems caused by hacking, technical failure or human error.

Additional resources on covering losses with business interruption insurance are available from the Insurance Information Institute here.

Zika and Business Interruption Insurance

As the Zika virus continues its rapid spread and amid travel warnings, including one advising pregnant women not to travel to popular tourist destination Miami Beach as well as advice to postpone non-essential travel to Florida’s Miami-Dade County, questions on business interruption insurance are bound to arise.

So this is perhaps a good time to review what a business interruption insurance policy covers.

The Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) reminds us that business interruption coverage, sometimes known as business income insurance, covers financial losses resulting from a business’s inability to operate because of property damage due to an insured event.

Generally, business interruption insurance will cover:

•Revenue lost due to the closure.

•Fixed expenses, such as rent and utility costs.

•Expenses of operating from a temporary location.

But there must be direct physical damage to the property from a covered event for a business to be reimbursed under the policy.

A good example of a covered event would be a fire or windstorm that might damage property thereby causing a business to lose income.

A mosquito-borne infectious disease does not appear to meet the threshold for property damage under a traditional business interruption policy therefore.

In addition, while businesses may lose income due to fewer customers and tourists visiting an area because of fear over the Zika outbreak and in response to travel warnings, legal experts say there are several reasons why traditional business interruption insurance policies are unlikely to respond.

Some businesses may have an extension to their property insurance policy that could provide some business interruption coverage for non-damage scenarios (i.e. where there is no physical damage to an insured’s property), but limitations and exceptions to this coverage may apply.

Recently, the World Economic Forum (WEF) observed that beyond direct health impacts, infectious diseases can impose significant additional economic costs through a response called “aversion behavior”.

Aversion behavior includes actions taken by individuals to avoid any exposure to the illness, as well as actions taken by investors as they anticipate those individual decisions.

Even individuals with no direct contact with the disease will take a range of actions to avoid any risk of contracting the disease, the WEF says:

“As shown by the recent Ebola outbreak, these reactions can be rational or they can dramatically overestimate risk, leading to a wide variety of factors that can negatively impact the economy, from stress to labour and supply scarcity, financial market instability, and price increases.”

The economic impact of aversion behavior may be significantly greater than the direct economic impact from sickness and death, the WEF said.

For example in 2015 the World Bank estimated a potential loss in GDP of more than US$1.6 billion in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone as a result of the Ebola epidemic, and more than US$500 million across the rest of the continent. This was based on an erosion in consumer and investor confidence and disruptions to travel and cross-border trade.

Check out I.I.I. facts and statistics on mortality risk here.

Zika virus resources from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are available online.

According to the CDC, as of August 17, there were 2,260 cases of Zika in the U.S.

Below is the CDC map of Zika cases reported in the U.S.:

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Business Interruption: Risks and Losses On the Rise

Economic impact from business interruption (BI) is often much higher than the cost of physical damage in a disaster and is a growing risk to companies worldwide, according to a new report from Allianz Global Corporate & Specialty (AGCS).

Its analysis of more than 1,800 large BI claims from 68 countries between 2010 and 2014 found that business interruption now typically accounts for a much higher proportion of the overall loss than was the case 10 years ago.

Both severity and frequency of BI claims is increasing, AGCS warns.

The average large BI property insurance claim is now in excess of €2 million (€2.2 million: $2.4 million), some 36 percent higher than the corresponding average property damage claim of just over €1.6 million ($1.8 million), the global claims  review found.

The vast majority of BI losses are not caused by natural catastrophes, with non-natural hazard events such as human error or technical failure accounting for 88 percent of BI losses by value.

Reported loss estimates from the largest non-natural catastrophe BI events across the insurance industry during 2015 total more than $7 billion so far, with the Tianjin loss potentially accounting for almost half this total.

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Fire and explosion is the top cause of BI loss around the globe by value (2010-2014), with each incident analyzed averaging €1.7m ($1.9 million) in BI costs alone, but there are some major differences regionally.

Storm and flood related losses are notable in Asia, highlighting the region’s continuing economic development and increasing exposure to natural hazards.

Storm is also the top cause of BI loss in the Caribbean and Central America region, accounting for one-third of insurance claims by value.

As Chris Fischer Hirs, CEO of AGCS, says:

The growth in BI claims is fueled by increasing interdependencies between companies, the global supply chain and lean production processes.

Whereas in the past a large fire or explosion may have only affected one or two companies, today losses increasingly impact a number of companies and can even threaten whole sectors globally.”

Check out Insurance Information Institute resources on business interruption insurance here.