Tag Archives: Digital Disruption

InsurTech disruption: threat or opportunity?

Whether you’re an InsurTech startup with new ideas or an incumbent concerned about protecting your book of business, the greatest risk you can take may be to resist collaboration, according to a post on Willis Towers Watson Wire.

In Threat vs Opportunity? InsurTech is largely a matter of perspective, Andrew Newman, president and global head of casualty at Willis Re, says while it’s understandable that many insurers have perceived InsurTech as a threat to the value chain, the biggest threat lies not in technology itself, but in competitors of any description leveraging these innovations to gain advantage by reducing risk and lowering costs.

“The plain fact is that the vast majority of InsurTech companies aren’t interested in going to war with incumbents. Their focus is on creating value within the insurance value chain – not collapsing it. So if incumbents embrace ‘disruption’, rather than concentrating on defending themselves by keeping these opportunities at arm’s length, then they will find that the available technology is largely complementary to most of the current processes in the industry.”

Download the presentation Insurance: Leading Through Disruption by Insurance Information Institute president and CEO Sean Kevelighan to find out more about how the industry is poised to lead through disruption.

Diverse Strategies As Insurers Embrace Digital Innovation

The routes to a digital future are many and varied, but for insurers the question is how to get there?

A new survey by Willis Towers Watson of 200 senior-level insurance executives offers some insight into the way forward.

The findings suggest that M&A and partnerships are likely to trump internal investment as insurers look to deliver digital transformation.

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Almost half (45 percent) of respondents to the survey signaled a clear preference for acquisitions as the way forward to gain digital capabilities.

By contrast, fewer than one in five insurers (17 percent) said they have a preference for internal development.

That’s not to say that internal innovation efforts have no place at these insurers, according to Willis Towers Watson, it’s more about getting the balance right between organic and inorganic growth.

Well over one-third (38 percent) of survey respondents say they have no preference between the two routes. In other words, they will use both acquisitions and internal innovation as the circumstances suit.

As insurers embrace a more outwards-looking approach to innovation, the survey suggests that traditional M&A deals are not the only option.

As Willis Towers Watson says:

“Many insurers are investing in a disparate range of technologies via venture capital funds – either through their own in-house venture capital arms, or third-party funds. This may be an attractive way to make a number of small bets on nascent innovations, rather than betting the house on an as-yet unproven technology.”

The survey found that one-third (31 percent) of respondents from the property/casualty insurance sector have set up a corporate venture arm already, while another third (32 percent) are considering doing so.

Innovation was a key topic of discussion at the Insurance Information Institute Property/Casualty Insurance Joint Industry Forum held yesterday in New York. For coverage of the forum go to the I.I.I. website.

Growing P/C Innovation Amid InsurTech, Trump Disruption

The pace of innovation in the U.S. property/casualty industry will accelerate in 2017, as technology advances and the growth of InsurTech raise customer expectations for greater innovation and new business models, according to a new report by Ernst & Young.

In its 2017 U.S. Property/Casualty Insurance Outlook, EY says the industry is at an inflection point, as continued economic headwinds provide little support for insurers plagued by shrinking investment incomes, escalating claims costs and rising regulations.

A new Trump administration raises the prospect of further economic and regulatory change and with the P/C industry in flux, this is a good time for CEOs to think through their future business strategies, EY suggests.

As insurers look to adapt to disruptive market shifts, EY expects companies will do more to develop a culture of innovation in 2017:

“The Internet of Things, telematics, artificial intelligence, driverless cars and blockchain have the potential to transform industry fundamentals and even redefine the nature of risk. In the future, competing for market share will be increasingly dependent on technology, data and analytics.”

With more than 1,000 InsurTech startups in operation, the pace of P/C innovation will speed up next year.

For example, in 2017 InsurTech startup Trov plans to roll out on-demand insurance that will enable customers to use their smart phones to turn coverage for personal belongings on and off. Trov is an example of how product innovation directed towards millennials could disrupt the P/C insurance model, EY says.

“Incumbents will be watching this space closely, creating venture funding groups that are actively monitoring and investing in InsurTech initiatives.”

Insurers will take digital transformation to the next level in 2017, expanding their use of robotics and advanced analytics across most aspects of their business, from claims handling and underwriting to customer relationship management (CRM) systems and risk management, according to EY’s outlook.

See our earlier blog post for latest data on the InsurTech sector.

Read about the top InsurTech deals of the year as reported by Insurance Networking News here.

Disruptive Change to Continue in 2016

U.S. property-casualty insurers face another year of disruptive change in 2016, according to a new report by Ernst & Young.

In its 2016 U.S. Property-Casualty Insurance Outlook, EY says that digital technologies such as social media, analytics and telematics will continue to transform the market landscape, recalibrating customer expectations and opening new ways to reach and acquire clients.

The rise of the sharing economy, in which assets like cars and homes can be shared, is requiring carriers to rethink traditional insurance models.

An outlook for slower economic growth, along with increased M&A and greater regulatory uncertainty, will set the stage for innovative firms to capitalize on an industry in flux in 2016.

EY’s take:

Insurers that stay ahead of these shifts should reap substantial benefits, while laggards risk falling behind, or even out of the race.”

EY reports that competitive pressures in the insurance industry are building as digital technology erodes the advantages of scale enjoyed by established insurers and empowers smaller players to compete for market share through more flexible pricing models and new distribution channels.

It cites the recent launch of Google Compare, which allows customers to comparison shop for insurance, as the start of a larger wave of insurance tech activity in 2016.

Along with this, customer expectations and behaviors are evolving at a rapid pace, often faster than traditional mechanisms can react.

EY observes:

Driven by their interactions in other digitally enabled industries, such as retail and banking, property-casualty customers are increasingly demanding a more sophisticated and personalized experience–including digital distribution, anytime access, premiums accurately reflecting usage and individual risk and higher levels of product customization and advice.”

Policyholders are also seeking coverage of a broader range of risks, such as cybersecurity and under-protected property exposure, according to EY’s outlook.

Hat tip to Insurance Journal which reported on this story here.

Check out a recent presentation by I.I.I. president Dr. Robert Hartwig titled Insurance, the Sharing Economy, Millennials and More.