Tag Archives: Fort McMurray Wildfire

Global Insured Disaster Losses in May: $7 billion and Counting

At least $7 billion—that’s how much global disasters and severe weather are expected to cost insurers and reinsurers in May.

Aon Benfield’s latest Global Catastrophe Recap Report notes that the Fort McMurray wildfire in Alberta, Canada, will become the costliest disaster in the country’s history.

Insured losses—including physical damage and business interruption—are expected to be in excess of $3.1 billion, while total economic losses will be well into the billions of dollars.

The fire charred more than 580,000 hectares (1.43 million acres) of land and destroyed at least 10 percent of Fort McMurray, including more than 2,400 homes and other structures.

Remarkably, no direct casualties were reported from the event as it prompted the largest evacuation in the history of Alberta.

Adam Podlaha, global head of Impact Forecasting, says:

“The severity of wildfire damage in Fort McMurray is an unfortunate reminder of how significant insurable losses can be from the peril.”

And:

“Since this is just the sixth individual global wildfire to surpass the billion-dollar threshold for insurers, there is not a lot of precedent for a fire event of this magnitude.”

Check out Insurance Information Institute wildfire facts and statistics here.

Elsewhere, severe weather and flooding in Europe where the storm ‘Elvira’ swept across parts of northern Europe between late May and early June caused most damage in Germany, France, Austria, Poland and Belgium, where floods impacted many major metro regions, including Paris.

Preliminary estimates from industry associations in France (MAIF) and Germany (GDV) put the estimated combined minimum claims payouts at in excess of $2.3 billion, while overall economic damage is tentatively estimated at $4.6 billion.

May also saw no fewer than five outbreaks of severe convective storms in the United States, affecting parts of the Plains, Midwest, and Mississippi Valley. Storm-related flooding also caused major damage in parts of Texas.

Total aggregated insured losses were estimated at over $1 billion, Aon’s Impact Forecasting unit said.

Meanwhile, Cyclone Roanu brought torrential rain to Sri Lanka, eastern India, Bangladesh, Myanmar and China during May, damaging or destroying nearly 125,000 homes and structures across all five countries. Estimated reconstruction costs were put at $1.7 billion, though insured losses are substantially less due to low insurance penetration.

Even after all that, May was not done, with other notable natural hazard events around the globe, including:

—Five separate instances of flooding impacted China as aggregated economic losses topped $1.5 billion. Most of the damage was attributed to agricultural interests.

—Other major flood and landslide events in May were reported in parts of Hispaniola, Kenya, Tajikistan, Afghanistan, Rwanda, Ethiopia, India and Yemen.

—Tropical Storm Bonnie brought heavy rainfall to portions of the Carolinas and Georgia in the United States at the end of May and into June. Total economic losses were expected to be minimal.

—Earthquakes in Ecuador and China caused damages to thousands of homes and a winter weather outbreak in northern China caused damage to crops totaling $61 million.

Canadian Wildfire Underscores Risk

If ever there were an example of the real danger posed by wildfires, the Fort McMurray wildfire in Alberta, Canada is it.

Firefighters are struggling to control this massive fire that started last Sunday, is estimated to have destroyed more than 1,600 structures in Fort McMurray and has resulted in more than 80,000 evacuations.

As gccapitalideas.com reports here, record high temperatures exceeding 32 C (90 F) and extremely dry air, together with strong winds have enabled the wildfire to grow and spread rapidly.

AIR Worldwide also reports:

“With very few exceptions, catastrophic wildfires occur when three conditions are met simultaneously: dry heat maximizes the volatility of vegetation; extreme winds, which can drive the propagation of a fire through that vegetation, occur; and a fire ignites close to a moderately or heavily populated area.”

All three of these conditions have occurred in the Fort McMurray vicinity, and AIR Worldwide notes: “the wildfire that is now happening there is certainly catastrophic.”

While it is too soon to know the extent of the damage and the size of the Fort McMurray wildfire insurance loss, some early reports are helpful.

AIR Worldwide makes the important point that because of the oil industry, housing in the Fort McMurray area is more expensive than its remoteness would suggest and already it is clear that there has been a massive loss of property.

Losses arising from this fire will likely far exceed those resulting from the Slave Lake wildfire in 2011 that destroyed 522 homes and structures, it suggests. The Slave Lake wildfire cost insurers more than C$700 million at the time, according to the Insurance Bureau of Canada.

One analyst at Bank of Montreal observed that if Fort McMurray has to be completely rebuilt, insured losses could reach as high as C$9 billion ($7 billion), making this the costliest insured disaster in Canadian history.

This catastrophe is also a reminder that wildfires pose a significant risk across the United States.

For more on how to protect property from wildfire damage and to reduce the costs associated with wildfire damage check out information from the Insurance Institute for Business and Home Safety (IBHS).