Tag Archives: Halloween

Catching All The Candy

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If your little monsters are determined to hunt down some spooky Pokémon on their trick-or-treat route this Halloween, be sure that the fun of finding Ghastly or Haunter doesn’t turn into a deadly distraction.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that Halloween is consistently one of the top three days for pedestrian injuries and fatalities, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that children are four times more likely to be struck by a motor vehicle on Halloween than on any other day of the year.

Excited trick-or-treaters often forget about safety, the American Automobile Association (AAA) warns, so motorists and parents must be even more alert.

The AAA offers these tips to keep young ones safe on Halloween.

Meanwhile, Pokémon GO’s virtual Halloween update is reportedly drawing players back to the mobile app that took the world by storm earlier this summer.

While catching all the candy could be a healthy alternative to eating all the candy, there are also some side effects that could prove hazardous.

Researchers at San Diego State University and UC San Diego found about 113,000 total incidences of a driver, passenger or pedestrian distracted by Pokémon GO in their review of Twitter postings over just a 10-day period (July 10 through July 19, 2016).

There were also 14 unique crashes—1 player drove his car into a tree—attributed to Pokémon GO in news reports during the same period.

The researchers noted that by rewarding movement Pokémon GO incentivizes physical activity.

“However, if players use their cars to search for Pokémon they negate any health benefit and incur serious risk.”

The study was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The good news is that injuries and property damage resulting from distracted Pokémon GO users are for the most part covered by insurance, according to the Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.).

In its smart road tips for Halloween safety, Consumer Reports advises the public not to use a cell phone or other mobile device while driving and to pull over safely to check voice messages or texts.

Check out I.I.I. facts and statistics on highway safety and distracted driving here.

Wishing all our readers a safe and happy Halloween!

A Happy—and Safe—Halloween

As we put the finishing touches to our Halloween costumes we’ve rounded up some of the not-so-spooky posts from around the insurance blogosphere to keep the ghouls and ghosts away.

First up is Erie Insurance with its post 4 Lesser-Known Halloween Safety Tips. Read all the way to the end and you’ll learn of the dangers of glow sticks. As a parent to two young children who gravitate towards anything that glows, I appreciate the tip that glow sticks cause an increase in poisoning on Halloween. Make sure to tell your kids to keep them away from their mouths.

Next up is Zillow and HomeInsurance.com with an excellent post on how Halloween carries potential financial risk for homeowners. Whether it’s Halloween-related fires leading to property damage or liability claims from trick-or-treaters injured on your property, some practical safety steps and a homeowners or renters insurance policy can help protect your most valuable assets.

Do you have a secure place to park your car? In this Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) post (from 2013)  we learn  that vehicle vandalism peaks on Halloween with nearly twice as many insurance claims on October 31 as on an average day. Such claims include things like slashed tires and smashed windows. Hence the importance of comprehensive auto insurance coverage.

And for the insurance fans  among you, last but not least is a post on WillisWire, reflecting not on make-believe monsters, but on the scariest real risks faced by their clients during the year. Which one keeps you up at night? Have your say and take their poll.

Wishing all our readers a safe and Happy Halloween!

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Happy Halloween – With Insurance

As you prepare to welcome a throng of Frozen Elsas and Olafs to your front door, you may not be thinking about insurance but we’re here to tell you, you’re covered.

The Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) points out that standard homeowners and renters insurance will provide coverage for the following:

Vandalism: In the event your home or your personal possessions are damaged by neighborhood tricksters, homeowners and renters insurance policies provide coverage for vandalism and malicious mischief. You are on your own, however, when it comes to removing the toilet paper from your front yard….

Fire: If a jack-o-lantern, or other decoration, goes up in flames and damages your property, your homeowners or renters policy will cover fire-related losses. And, should the blaze make your home uninhabitable, additional living expenses (ALE) coverage will pay for alternate accommodations, such as a hotel, while your home is being repaired.

Injuries: The liability portion of a homeowners or renters policy comes into play if a Halloween party guest, or a trick-or-treater is injured while at your house or apartment. These policies also include no-fault medical coverage so the injured person can file their claim directly with your insurer. And if Fido gets a little skittish from all the commotion and accidently nips a trick-or-treater your liability coverage includes damages or injuries caused by pets.

Have a safe and happy Halloween!

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Spooky Insurance

As the Lady Gagas and Harry Potters come out Monday night, your standard auto and homeowners policies should have you covered in case you receive more tricks than treats.

The I.I.I. gives several examples of how insurance can protect you from Halloween-related losses. For instance, if your home is damaged in a Halloween prank your homeowners or renters policy provides coverage for vandalism, after the deductible is met.

Similarly, if your car is damaged by mischievous trick-or-treaters, there is coverage under the optional comprehensive portion of your auto insurance policy.

If you expect to be handing out candy or throwing a Halloween party, again you would be covered if a trick-or-treater or guest is accidentally injured in your house or apartment, the I.I.I. says. The liability portion of your homeowners or renters insurance policy covers you in the event you are sued by the injured party.

While it’s reassuring to have these insurance policies in place, it’s also important to follow some basic safety steps, such as:

– Ensure there’s a clear path to your front door by removing all objects that could cause children to trip or fall.

– Turn your outside lights on if you welcome trick-or-treaters.

– Take caution when using candles, jack-o-lanterns, matches and lighters and keep them out of reach of children and away from flammable materials.

– Have a plan for your pet especially if they are easily spooked by guests or doorbells.

– Motorists need to be extra cautious and watch for children, especially after dark.

Halloween Safety

Because Halloween falls on a Sunday this year the usual costume parties and trick-or-treating may extend over the weekend. While this makes for a fun time, it also means this Halloween has the potential to be particularly hazardous.

Luckily, insurers have some tips to help make the holiday a little less spooky:

Geico reports that with so many people enjoying the holiday, it’s necessary to be cautious whether trick-or-treating on foot or behind the wheel of your car. The U.S. Department of Transportation notes that the most dangerous time on Halloween for young pedestrians is between 4 and 8 p.m., prime trick-or-treating time. Geico urges drivers to watch for young children running in the streets, keep driving distractions such as cell phones out of reach, and to  slow down.

The number of people in California hit by cars jumps 25 percent on Halloween vs. the rest of October, according to Allstate Insurance Co. The insurer asks Californians to keep their eyes on the road whether driving or on foot during Halloween. It offers the following three safety tips: don’t text and walk; don’t text and drive; don’t drink and drive.

Anyone hosting a Halloween party should take steps to limit their liquor liability and make sure they have the property insurance, according to the Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.). I.I.I. vice-president Loretta Worters notes that depending on the jurisdiction, violations of social host laws can lead to civil or criminal fines, imprisonment and monetary damages awards. So, if you’re throwing a party where alcohol is served, be a responsible host.

Have a safe and happy Halloween!

Trick or Treat?

Halloween can be a fun time, but it can also be a costly one for insurers according to a report from across the Pond. A U.K. insurer quoted in an article by the London Guardian newspaper says that home insurance claims are expected to rise by 270 percent on Halloween. Another U.K. insurer claims that 3.6 million homeowners will face damage to their properties as some revelers go too far in their pranks. This side of the Atlantic Halloween brings with it increased concerns about drunk driving and liability risks, I.I.I. finds. Social host liability laws exist in many states so anyone hosting a Halloween party should take steps to limit their liquor liability and make sure they have the proper insurance. I.I.I. vice president Loretta Worters notes that depending on the jurisdiction, violations of social host laws can lead to civil or criminal fines, imprisonment and monetary damages awards. Bear in mind that in 2008, 58 percent of all highway fatalities across the U.S. on Halloween night involved a driver or a motorcycle rider with a BAC of .08 or higher, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The I.I.I. has a list of tips on how to protect yourself and your assets if you plan on hosting a Halloween party.