Tag Archives: Health & Safety

Industry Groups Gather in Sacramento to Help Keep Teens Safe on the Road

Over 1,000 people die each year in crashes with teenage drivers during the ‘100 deadliest days’ of summer which span from Memorial day until students go back to school.

I.I.I.’s California representative Janet Ruiz reports in her blog on a media event that took place on July 20th where speakers from concerned groups including AAA, CDI, CHP, PCI and I.I.I. gave parents advice on how to keep teens safe on the road.

A Happy—and Safe—Halloween

As we put the finishing touches to our Halloween costumes we’ve rounded up some of the not-so-spooky posts from around the insurance blogosphere to keep the ghouls and ghosts away.

First up is Erie Insurance with its post 4 Lesser-Known Halloween Safety Tips. Read all the way to the end and you’ll learn of the dangers of glow sticks. As a parent to two young children who gravitate towards anything that glows, I appreciate the tip that glow sticks cause an increase in poisoning on Halloween. Make sure to tell your kids to keep them away from their mouths.

Next up is Zillow and HomeInsurance.com with an excellent post on how Halloween carries potential financial risk for homeowners. Whether it’s Halloween-related fires leading to property damage or liability claims from trick-or-treaters injured on your property, some practical safety steps and a homeowners or renters insurance policy can help protect your most valuable assets.

Do you have a secure place to park your car? In this Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) post (from 2013)  we learn  that vehicle vandalism peaks on Halloween with nearly twice as many insurance claims on October 31 as on an average day. Such claims include things like slashed tires and smashed windows. Hence the importance of comprehensive auto insurance coverage.

And for the insurance fans  among you, last but not least is a post on WillisWire, reflecting not on make-believe monsters, but on the scariest real risks faced by their clients during the year. Which one keeps you up at night? Have your say and take their poll.

Wishing all our readers a safe and Happy Halloween!

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Early Warning On Heat Health Risk

As many parts of the United States enter another day of high heat and humidity, we’re reading about the first ever heatwave warning guidelines issued by the United Nations earlier this month.

The guidelines are intended to alert the general public, health services and government agencies via the development of so-called heatwave early warning systems that should ultimately lead to actions that reduce the effects of hot weather extremes on health.

As the foreword to the publication states:

Heatwaves are a dangerous natural hazard, and one that requires increased attention. They lack the spectacular and sudden violence of other hazards, such as tropical cyclones or flash floods, but the consequences can be severe.”

In their joint guidance, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) note that heatwaves are becoming more frequent and more intense as a result of climate change.

According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the length, frequency and intensity of heatwaves will likely increase over most land areas during this century.

Recent world heatwave events come to mind:

Both India and Pakistan were hit by deadly heatwaves in the first half of 2015, leading to 3,600 fatalities, according to Munich Re. Temperatures were exceptional, climbing as high as 47 °C and accompanied by high humidity which compounded the effect.

European heatwaves in the summer of 2003 led to the deaths of tens of thousands of people, as did the Russian heatwaves, forest fires and associated air pollution in 2010. In fact, the Russian heatwave of 2010 still ranks among the top 10 deadliest world catastrophes 1970-2014.

The UN guidance makes the case that one way to manage the risk of heat-related health effects is through the development of a Heat Health Warning System (HHWS) as part of a broader Heat Health Action Plan (HHAP).

Of primary concern in an HHWS, it notes, is how to assess the level of heat stress associated with the meteorological or climate forecast, translate this into an estimate of a likely health outcome and identify a critical heat-stress threshold for a graded plan of action.

Typically, HHWSs are composed of a number of elements, including:

  • Weather forecasts of high temperatures that may also include humidity;
  • A method for assessing how future weather patterns may evolve in terms of a range of health outcomes;
  • The determination of heat-stress thresholds for action;
  • A system of graded alerts/actions for communication to the general population or specific target groups about an impending period of heat and its intensity and to government agencies about the possible severity of health impacts.

A number of cities and countries around the world have developed these early warning systems, including Canada, England, France, Germany, Italy, the United States and Australia.

The first HHWS was actually implemented in the city of Philadelphia in the United States in 1995. In this system, local city staff work with the National Weather Service (NWS) to determine when a heatwave is imminent.

After an alert is issued, the Philadelphia Health Department contacts news organizations with tips on how vulnerable individuals can protect themselves. People without air conditioning are advised to seek relief from the heat in shopping malls, senior centers and other cool spaces.

Friends, relatives, neighbors and other volunteers are also encouraged to make daily visits to elderly people during the hot weather, ensuring the most susceptible individuals have sufficient fluids, proper ventilation and other amenities to cope with the weather.

After the success of Philadelphia, similar tailor-made systems are being implemented for the 50-60 cities in the U.S. with a population of more than 500,000 and a local meteorological office, the guidance notes.

The NWS reports that heat is typically the leading cause of weather-related fatalities each year.

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Check out Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) facts and statistics on drought and heatwaves here.

Fourth of July Celebrations Spark Pet Injuries

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While Fourth of July is a time of celebration for Americans, man’s best friend may be at increased risk for injury and illness over the holiday.

Veterinary Pet Insurance Co shares the most common Fourth of July related pet injuries based on its database of more than 525,000 insured pets.

Pets are at risk for a number of firework-related injuries. Common injuries include: burns; strangulation from getting a collar caught on a fence or jumping a fence due to the loud noise of fireworks; and laceration from breaking through a glass window or fence. Average costs for treatment run upward from $355.

Other common holiday-related injuries/illness include heat stroke, drowning after falling in a pool and poisoning from eating chocolate or table scraps and ingesting alcohol.

VPI suggests pet owners plan ahead with the following tips to keep our furry friends safe during the holiday weekend:

  1. Set up a safe zone for your pet and never leave your pet unattended or tied up in the back yard.
  2. Leave out extra water bowls to ensure your pet stays hydrated and be aware of foods that could be toxic to your dog.
  3. Be mindful of your dog around a pool and if they are allowed to swim, make sure they’re a comfortable swimmer and know how to get out of the pool.

The American Kennel Club makes the point that it’s safer to keep your pets at home during Fourth of July celebrations instead of bringing them to your neighbor’s party. Keeping your pet in a safe room where he/she is comfortable can reduce stress from the noise of fireworks.

Have a safe and happy Fourth of July!

Dog Bite Claims, By The Numbers

National Dog Bite Prevention Week is coming up… Here are some numbers to consider:

  • – Dog bites caused more than 33 percent of all homeowners insurance liability claims in 2014, costing in excess of $530 million
  • – The average cost per claim has increased more than 67 percent from 2003 to 2014
  • – The number of dog-bite claims actually decreased by 4.7 percent  but the average cost per claim increased 15 percent  from $27,862 in 2013 to $32,072 in 2014
  • – California (1,867), Ohio (1,009) and New York (965) had the highest number of claims in 2014
  • – New York had the highest average cost per claim in the country: a whopping $56,628

Costs per claims have risen due to a variety of factors including increased medical costs and jury awards.   In addition to dog bites, some claims are due to dogs knocking down children, cyclists, the elderly, which can result in fractures and other injuries. All these factors impact the potential severity of losses.

Contact @LWorters for more information.

Thanksgiving Crowd Control

As holiday shopping gets underway, several major retailers are opening even earlier this year offering the prospect of deep discounts and large crowds to an ever growing number of shoppers.

The National Retail Federation (NRF) notes that 140 million holiday shoppers are likely to take advantage of Thanksgiving weekend deals in stores and online.

Millennials are most eager to shop, with the NRF survey showing 8 in 10 (79.6 percent) of 18-24 year olds will or may shop over the weekend, the highest of any age group.

Much has been written about the risks of online shopping, but for those who still head to the stores, there are dangers there too.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reminds us that crowd related injuries can occur during special sales and promotional events. In 2008, a worker at Wal-Mart died after being trampled in a Black Friday stampede.

According to the aptly named blackfridaydeathcount.com, since 2006 there have been seven Black Friday-related fatalities and 90 injuries. As well as stampeding crowds, injuries have occurred as a result of altercations over TVs, road rage over parking spaces, shootings and distracted driving.

For employers and store owners OSHA offers comprehensive tips on how to create a safe shopping experience.

Crowd management planning should begin in advance of events likely to draw large crowds, and crowd management, pre-event setup, and emergency situation management should be part of event planning, OSHA says.

Tips include: hiring additional staff; having trained security or crowd management personnel on site; determining the number of workers needed in different locations to ensure the safety of an event; and preparing an emergency plan that addresses potential dangers facing workers including overcrowding, crowd crushing, being struck by the crowd, violent acts and fire.

For shoppers too, a personal safety and security plan is a good idea. The National Crime Prevention Council (NCPC) advises not to buy more than you can carry and to plan ahead by taking a friend with you or asking a store employee to help you carry packages to the car. Travelers offers some important tips here.

To all our readers, have a happy and safe Thanksgiving!

Insurers Making Headway On Opioid Abuse Problem

I.I.I. chief actuary James Lynch brings us a grim story on drug abuse and how it affects insurers:

This week Contingencies magazine published my article tracing how America’s latest drug epidemic has affected workers compensation insurance.

The epidemic comes from 20 years of gradually increasing use (and abuse) of opioids, a special class of prescription drugs that mimic many of the effects of heroin. Some you may have heard of, like Vicodin or OxyContin. Prescribed legally but highly addictive, they have become the most commonly abused class of drugs in America.

More people die from drug overdoses in America than from car accidents, and opioids lead the tragic parade. In 2010, for example, 16,652 people died from opioid overdoses, more than from heroin and cocaine combined. Opioids toll has tripled since the late 1990s.

My article shows how the growing epidemic played out in workers comp. Narcotics make up 25 percent of workers comp drug costs, and more than 45 percent of narcotics dollars pay for drugs containing oxycodone, according to the National Council on Compensation Insurance.

Insurers have acted as the crisis emerged, and now they as well as federal, state and local officials may be making headway against the problem.

Last week, after my article went to press, AIG’s new chief executive, Peter Hancock, noted his company had teamed with Johns Hopkins University to study opioid abuse among the company’s 23 million workers compensation claims.

“It is a terrible cost to the industry, a terrible cost to employers, and it’s a terrible cost to society,” Hancock told The Wall Street Journal. AIG has medical professionals working with doctors to find ways to alleviate pain without turning to opioids.

The most recent federal action reclassifies any drug containing the opioid hydrocodone as a Schedule II drug, meaning its prescriptions are more tightly controlled than before.

Unfortunately, these actions may be too late to prevent many opioid addicts from switching to heroin. Opioids tantalize the same brain receptors as heroin, and there are signs that addicts deprived of their Oxys switch.

Insects, Spiders and Mites: A Workplace Hazard

Construction workers, farmers and landscape workers take note: insect-related deaths are most likely in your line of work.

As reported by The Wall Street Journal’s The Numbers blog, a new report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) finds that insects, arachnids, and mites were involved in 83 fatal occupational injuries from 2003 to 2010.

During the course of the eight-year period, farmers and farm workers (20 fatalities), construction occupations (19 fatalities) and landscaping workers (17 fatalities) accounted for two-thirds of the deaths.

Bees were responsible for 52 workplace deaths — more than spiders, wasps and ants combined (25), The Numbers blog reports.

Most of the deaths (72 of the 83 total) were directly caused by an insect, including cases in which the worker was bitten or stung.

Another 11 deaths were indirectly caused by insects. These include cases where an insect distracted the worker while driving or caused the worker to fall from a height.

Anaphylactic shock, often associated with insect-related injuries, occurred in close to half the deaths, the BLS said.

By state, Texas saw the greatest number (21) of insect-related workplace deaths during the 8-year period, followed by Florida (8).

However, when it comes to non-fatal insect-related workplace injuries and illnesses with days away from work, four states: California, Florida, New York and Texas had more than 250 cases reported in all three years between 2008 and 2010.

As a percentage of all days-away-from-work cases in those large population states, though, insect-related cases were less than 1 percent of the total cases in any year.

Not surprisingly, these incidents tended to occur in the warmer months. Almost 94 percent of the cases occurred between April 1 and October 31. The largest number of deaths (17) occurred in September.

Check out National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)  information on workplace safety and insects here.

Risks of Physical Inactivity

Are you physically active? You may have more reason to be after reading these startling statistics on physical inactivity from the World Health Organization (WHO).

According to WHO, physical inactivity is the fourth leading risk factor in global mortality. It is only outstripped by high blood pressure (13 percent) and tobacco use (9 percent) and carries the same level of risk as high blood glucose (6 percent).

In fact some 3.2 million people die each year because they are not active enough, WHO says. Globally, one in three adults is not active enough.

And physical inactivity is on the rise in many countries, adding to the burden of noncommunicable diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer and diabetes, and affecting general health worldwide.

WHO notes that people who are insufficiently active have a 20 percent to 30 percent increased risk of death compared to people who engage in at least 30 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity on most days of the week.

Another interesting takeaway: in high-income countries, 41 percent of men and 48 percent of women were insufficiently physically active, compared to 18 percent of men and 21 percent of women in low-income countries.

Low or decreasing physical activity levels often correspond with a high or rising gross national product, WHO reports.

The decline in physical activity is partly due to inaction during leisure time and sedentary behavior on the job and at home. Likewise, an increase in the use of “passive† modes of transportation also contributes to physical inactivity.

It’s important not to confuse physical activity with exercise.

WHO defines physical activity as any bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles that requires energy expenditure – including activities undertaken while working, playing, carrying out household chores, traveling and engaging in recreational pursuits.

Exercise (a subset of physical activity) is planned structured, repetitive, and aims to improve or maintain one or more components of physical fitness.

So what do we need to do to reduce our risk?

For children and adolescents WHO recommends 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous intensity activity per day.

For adults (18+), the recommendation is 150 minutes of moderate-intensity activity per week.

Check out I.I.I. facts and statistics on mortality risk.

Cavalcade of Risk #194: Is this just fantasy?

Is this the real life? Is this just fantasy? Either way, we’re delighted to be taking our first turn at hosting Cavalcade of Risk #194. For those of you who, like us, are new to this, the CavRisk blog carnival is a round-up of risk and insurance-related posts from around the blogosphere.

Our debut as a Cav host kicks off with a post on fantasy insurance in which Hank Stern of InsureBlog poses the question: What if your Fantasy Footballer gets sidelined in real life? The good news is there’s an insurance policy for that. Game on.

Next up, at Workers’ Comp Insider, Julie Ferguson, brings us back to real life with a roundup of the impact that the government shutdown is having on workplace health & safety and various regulatory and employment-related matters. It’s her second, and hopefully last, roundup on the shutdown, Julie notes.

Another real world post comes from Jason Shafrin of Healthcare Economist about how the Affordable Care Act (ACA) mandates insurers to have a medical loss ratio (MLR) of at least 80 percent. In his post What’s up with the ACA’s Medical Loss Ratio rules?  he considers whether capping MLR is a good way to reduce premiums.

Also keeping it real on the topic of the ACA, Louise Norris of Colorado Health Insurance Insider, dispels another ACA myth that just won’t die as she talks about part of the House amendment to “delay Obamacare† in House Republicans Want To Strip Congressional Staffers Of Their Health Insurance Benefits.

Last but certainly not least, in his post Patients should not be responsible for telling doctors to wash their hands David Williams of Health Business Blog ponders the absurd situation in which patients are being cast in the role of “hand washing police.†

Over and out from us. Jason Hull at http://www.hullfinancialplanning.com will host the next Cavalcade of Risk.