Tag Archives: High-rise Buildings

High rise fire risk in Asia

Insurance Information Institute research assistant Brent Carris authors today’s post:

In Gen Re’s Property Matters series, Tom Qiu reports that with the super high rise (SHR) construction rate growing each year, there is potential for large scale loss of life and significant property/casualty claims.

Per the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) Year in Review: Asia recorded 107 of the 128, or 84% of the completed high rise constructions for 2016. China alone, accounted for 84 (67%) of the global total.

Incidents like the Grenfell Tower fire this year in London (see our prior post) and Address Downtown hotel fire of 2015 in Dubai, remind us of the fire risk and resulting huge claims surrounding high rises.

In order to properly rate SHR buildings, underwriters must carefully assess technical survey reports along with visual inspections. In addition to underwriting risks, claims management can be very difficult due to the numerous types of policies involved in a SHR building fire.

London fire renews focus on prevention and safety

Fire safety officials around the world are reinforcing prevention and evacuation guidance to high-rise residents following the deadly 24-story apartment building fire at Grenfell Tower in West London.

So far, at least 17 people are confirmed dead in the fire (Editor’s note: at least 80 people now confirmed or presumed dead). UK prime minister Theresa May has ordered a public inquiry into the blaze. Insurance will play a role in the recovery.

Officials say that while catastrophic fires on the scale of Grenfell Tower are statistically rare, awareness is key.

GlobalNews.ca reports here, NJ.com here, and the Manchester Evening News reports here. USA Today lists the worst high-rise fires in history here.

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) reports that the fire death per 1,000 fires and the average loss per fire are generally lower in high-rise buildings than in other buildings of the same property use.

“A major reason why risks are lower is probably the much greater use of fire protection systems and features in high-rise buildings as compared to shorter buildings.”

High-rise buildings are more likely to have fire detection, sprinklers and to be built of fire-resistive construction and are less likely to spread beyond the room or floor of origin than fires in shorter buildings, the NFPA says.

From 2009 to 2013, U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated average of 14,500 reported structure fires in high-rise buildings per year.

Five property types account for three-quarters (73 percent) of high-rise fires: apartments or other multi-family housing; hotels; dormitories or dormitory type properties; facilities that care for the sick; and office buildings.

NFPA adds that high-rise buildings present several unique challenges not found in traditional low-rise buildings, including longer egress times and distance, evacuation strategies, fire department accessibility, smoke movement and fire control.

The two deadliest high-rise fires in U.S. history were caused by terrorism: the fires and collapse of the twin towers after two planes flew into the World Trade Center, New York City on September 11, 2001, and the April 19, 2005 truck bomb outside a nine-story federal building in Oklahoma City.

I.I.I. fire statistics are here.