Tag Archives: Marsh

Eye On Commercial Insurance Prices

Two broker surveys give insight on where U.S. commercial insurance prices are at.

Willis Towers Watson’s most recent Commercial Lines Pricing Survey (CLIPS) shows commercial insurance prices were again nearly flat during the fourth quarter of 2016:

As you can see above, price changes reported by carriers were less than 1 percent for the fifth consecutive quarter, following a moderating trend in price increases that began in the first quarter of 2013.

The outlier in the results? Commercial auto, where meaningful price increases continue to be reported. Price changes for most other lines fell in the low single digits, according to the CLIPS survey.

Meanwhile, the Marsh Global Insurance Market Index Q4 2016 found that U.S. composite insurance rates were down 3 percent in the fourth quarter of 2016, in line with the global rate:

Marsh said the continuing decline in U.S. commercial insurance prices was driven largely by decreases in property insurance pricing.

However, U.S. cyber liability rates continued to increase for the sixth consecutive quarter, albeit at a moderating rate, Marsh noted.

Cyber price increases don’t appear to be deterring businesses from buying this essential coverage.

The number of Marsh clients purchasing cyber insurance increased by 25 percent from 2015 to 2016 across all industries, with the greatest overall uptake in healthcare, communications, media and technology.

See more on the importance of cyber insurance to businesses in this Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) white paper.

Significant trends shaping the property/casualty insurance business are discussed in this I.I.I. presentation.

Commercial Insurance Market: Generally Favorable For Buyers

Ample capacity and continued competition are expected to continue to put near term downward pressure on insurance rates in major classes of commercial property/casualty business, according to Marsh.

However, industry developments including recent earnings announcements, senior management changes and re-underwriting at several companies bear watching, said Marsh in its just-released U.S. Insurance Market Report.

Marsh’s analysis put average rate decreases in the fourth quarter of 2015 at between 5 percent and 10 percent for non-catastrophe exposed risks and by between 5 percent and 15 percent for moderately catastrophe-exposed risks.

Likewise, U.S. public company directors and officers (D&O) insurance rates were on average flat to down 10 percent in the fourth quarter, while U.S. commercial general liability rates on average renewed at between 10 percent rate decreases and 5 percent increases.

Amid the rate decreases across most classes of business, cyber insurance bucked the trend.

Typical cyber rate increases in the first half of 2015 were 10 percent to 15 percent over the prior year.

However, the retail and healthcare sectors, which have seen some of the costliest data breach events, saw increases ranging from 45 percent to 55 percent and 15 percent to 25 percent, respectively.

Marsh noted that demand for cyber insurance rose in 2015–a trend expected to continue in 2016.

Despite the overall pattern of soft pricing, amid ample capacity, competition and relatively low catastrophe losses, Robert Bentley, president of Marsh’s U.S. and Canada division warned that now is not the time to be complacent:

Organizations need to stay abreast of the ever-changing marketplace and risk landscape, where new and emerging risks can quickly escalate if not properly managed.”

More information on the cyber insurance market can be found in the Insurance Information Institute  white paper Cyber Risks: Threat and Opportunities.

U.S. Elections Add to Growing Political Risks Businesses Face

The 2016 U.S. presidential election is one of the rising political risks facing businesses and investors in the year ahead, according to Marsh’s Political Risk Map 2016.

Terrorism and struggling emerging economies, such as China and Russia, are also among the growing political risks businesses face.

Marsh notes that the recent terrorist attacks in Paris and San Bernardino, California have intensified political rhetoric and brought foreign relations and defense policy topics to the forefront.

With polls showing national security to be a major concern for voters, foreign policy will remain a key theme on the campaign trail in 2016 – and will be top of mind for the next presidential administration.”

Marsh observes that in the last decade multinational organizations have undertaken unprecedented international expansion, leaving them exposed to global credit and political risks like never before.

And those risks–including terrorism and political violence, armed conflicts, increasingly powerful anti-establishment political movements, and persistently low commodity prices–continue to grow.

Against this backdrop, it’s critical for businesses to be prepared for the possibility that political violence, unrest, or other large- scale crises will quickly develop in virtually any part of the world – including those countries that were historically seen as safe or stable, Marsh says.

Companies can prepare for these risks by managing their credit risk, building resilient supply chains, protecting their people and by protecting their assets through insurance.

Marsh notes:

Credit and political risk insurance can protect against a variety of risks, including expropriation, political violence, currency inconvertibility, non-payment, and contract frustration.”

Marsh’s Political Risk Map 2016, with data and insight from BMI Research, presents country risk scores for more than 200 countries and territories, helping businesses and investors make smarter decisions about where and how to deploy financial resources–including risk capital–globally in 2016 and beyond.

UK Business Leaders Often Unaware Cyber Is an Insurable Risk

A new report from across the pond points to a large gap in awareness when it comes to cyber risk and the use of insurance among business leaders of some of the UK’s largest firms.

Half of the leaders of these organizations do not realize that cyber risks can be insured despite the escalating threat, the report found.

Business leaders who are aware of insurance solutions for cyber tend to overestimate the extent to which they are covered. In a recent survey, some 52 percent of CEOs of large organizations believe that they have cover, whereas in fact less than 10 percent does.

Actual penetration of standalone cyber insurance among UK large firms is only 2 percent and this drops to nearly zero for smaller companies, according to the report.

While this picture is likely a result of the complexity of insurance policies with respect to cyber, with cyber sometimes included, sometimes excluded and sometimes covered as part of an add-on policy, the report says:

This evidence suggests a failure by insurers to communicate their value to business leaders in coping with cyber risk. This may, in part, reflect the new and therefore uncertain nature of this risk, with boards more focused on security improvement and recovery planning than on risk transfer. It nevertheless risks leaving insurance marginalized from one of the key risks facing firms.”

Senior managers in some of the UK’s largest firms were interviewed for the report published jointly by the British government and Marsh, with expert input from 13 London market insurers.

As a first step to raising awareness, Lloyd’s, the Association of British Insurers (ABI) and the UK government have agreed to develop a guide to cyber insurance that will be hosted on their websites.

Reuters has more on the report here.