Tag Archives: National Safety Council

Some states make progress in tackling opioid epidemic

Prescription opioid use among injured workers decreased in many states, but not all, according to the Workers Compensation Research Institute (WCRI).

Find out which states saw the largest decreases in this new WCRI study.

The National Safety Council (NSC) has developed a new industry specific online calculator that informs employers how much the opioid epidemic is costing companies each year.

The tool provides business leaders with specific information about the cost of substance use (including prescription drug abuse and misuse, alcohol abuse and misuse, opioid and heroin addiction as well as abuse of other illicit drugs and marijuana) in their workplace based on size of employee base, industry and state.

Posted here, the NSC calculator combines latest government and private sector research to estimate annual costs in three categories: time lost form work, job turnover and retraining, and health care costs.

A new NSC survey found only 39% of employers view prescription drug use as a threat to safety, and only 24% feel it is a problem, despite 71% saying they have experienced an issue.

Long Road To Better Data On Drowsy, Drunk, Drugged And Distracted Driving

States are underreporting critical data from crash scenes that could make a big difference in efforts to prevent help prevent traffic fatalities and injuries.

A National Safety Council review of motor vehicle crash reports found that:

  • All 50 states lack fields or codes for law enforcement to record the level of driver fatigue at the time of a crash;
  • 26 state reports lack fields to capture texting;
  • 32 states lack fields to record hands-free cell phone use;
  • 32 states lack fields to identify specific types of drug use if drugs are detected, including marijuana.

States are also failing to capture teen driver restrictions (35 states), and the use of advanced driver assistance technologies (50 states) and of infotainment systems (47 states).

Excluding these fields limits the ability to effectively address these problems, NSC said.

“Collecting data from a crash scene may be seen as merely “filling out accident reports” for violation and insurance purposes. Data collection efforts immediately following a crash provide a unique opportunity to help guide prevention strategies. Currently, some states are recording this type of data and others are not. When data of this kind is requested to be reported on a crash report and is entered, prevention professionals will have the data to better understand driver and non-motorist behaviors. When this data is not recorded, prevention professionals are left guessing.”

The call for better data collection follows the release of NSC figures showing that in 2016 there were more than 40,000 traffic fatalities in the U.S. for the first time in 10 years.

A recent I.I.I. white paper found that in the past two years, both the accident rate and the size of insurance claims have climbed dramatically. These are the largest and most volatile components of auto insurance.

Check out additional I.I.I. facts and statistics on highway safety.

Insurers Active In Auto Crash Prevention Efforts

2016 may have been the deadliest year on the roads since 2007, with an estimated cost to society of $432 billion, according to preliminary data released by the National Safety Council (NSC).

“As many as 40,000 people died in motor vehicle crashes in 2016, a 6 percent increase over 2015 and a 14 percent increase over 2014—the most dramatic two-year escalation in 53 years.”

A recent Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) white paper on personal auto insurance offered this prescient warning:

“There has been an alarming increase in crashes and claims reported. This, combined with the cost of the claims themselves, has led to a dramatic rise in the overall loss cost.”

And:

Technology is both improving and complicating matters, making vehicles safer but at the same time amplifying possible driver distractions, as discussed in this New York Times article.

The NSC call for life-saving measures, includes:

Extend laws banning all cell phone use – including hands-free – to all drivers, not just teens; upgrade enforcement from secondary to primary in states with existing bans.

I.I.I. tips on how to keep your auto insurance affordable here.

Too Few Aware of Opioid Risk

I.I.I. chief actuary Jim Lynch brings us some surprising numbers on America’s addiction to opioids:

Americans are grossly misinformed about the dangers of opioid drugs, according to a recent survey by the National Safety Council (NSC).

Opioids are commonly prescribed painkillers like Vicodin, OxyContin and Percocet. The drugs are meant to mimic the nervous system actions of heroin and morphine and all too often lead to similar levels of addiction and suffering. More than 170,000 Americans have died from opioid overdoses this century, nearly triple the number of U.S. military deaths in Vietnam (see my earlier post).

I wrote about the epidemic in Contingencies magazine, focusing on the toll the drugs have taken in the workers compensation system.

Too few Americans are aware of this risk, according to the survey of 1,014 adults, reported in the March 24 edition of Workers’ Compensation Report. Just one in five considered opioids to be a serious safety threat. Only 12 percent said addiction was a concern; two-thirds were unconcerned about any side effects from the drugs.

Education is part of the problem. Only 29 percent of respondents said they had taken or been prescribed an opioid in the past three years, though the number jumped to 42 percent once they were provided with a list of common opioids.

Nearly 60 percent of users had at least one addiction risk factor. Common risk factors include alcoholism, depression, use of psychiatric medication or being the victim of physical, mental or sexual abuse.

Users held opioids in high esteem. For example, 78 percent said they were the fastest method of pain relief, 74 percent said they were stronger pain relievers than alternative prescriptions, and 71 percent said they were the best way to relieve pain.

They underestimate the risk. Though 16,235 people died from prescription drug overdoses in 2013, just 19 percent of survey respondents said they had major concerns about the risk of injury or death from the drugs.

That’s less concern than they had about injury or death from severe weather or a natural disaster, from which 586 people died in 2013, and about the same level of concern as riding in a commercial airliner in the U.S., an activity that in 2013 killed eight, roughly 0.5 percent as many as opioids.

Details on the NSC survey can be found here.