Tag Archives: NICB

Three-year Decline in Metal Theft Claims

Good news for insurers. Latest data points to a promising decline in the national problem of metal theft, according to the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB).

In a new report, the NICB notes that in just three years the number of metal theft insurance claims has declined by over 26 percent from 14,676 in 2011 to 10,807 in 2013.

The report reviews metal theft claims from January 1, 2011, through December 31, 2013.

During this period, 41,138 insurance claims for the theft of copper, bronze, brass or aluminum were handled – of which 39,976 (97 percent) were for copper alone.

The NICB notes that when the number of metal theft insurance claims per month and monthly average copper prices are compared, the number of claims filed is found to have a statistically significant correlation with the price of copper.

Tightening controls on the sale of scrap metal have had a positive impact in local communities, the NICB says.

Ohio still ranks first of all states generating 4,144 metal theft claims in 2013, followed by Texas (2,827), California (2,489), Pennsylvania (2,345) and Georgia (2,067).

New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA (1,725 claims) was the leading statistical area generating the most metal theft claims.

More on the link between copper prices and incidents of metal theft in this NICB video.

NICB: Heavy Equipment Theft a Costly Crime for Insurers

As mom to two young boys I’ve had to become familiar with construction vehicle terminology, such as backhoes, skid steers and excavators. So it’s with interest I read the latest heavy equipment theft report from the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB).

The report, co-produced with the National Equipment Register (NER), analyzes heavy equipment theft data submitted by law enforcement to the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) and breaks out the data by theft state, theft city, theft month, equipment manufacturer, equipment style (type) and year of manufacture.

Here are some of the key takeaways of the 2012 NICB Heavy Equipment Theft report:

— A total of 10,925 heavy equipment thefts were reported to law enforcement in 2012, down 7 percent from the 11,705 reported in 2011. Since 2008, there has been an overall 19 percent reduction in heavy equipment thefts.

— The three most stolen heavy equipment items in 2012 were: mowers (riding or garden tractor: 5,363); loaders (skid steer, wheeled: 1,943); tractors (wheeled or tracked: 1,459).

— Heavy equipment manufactured by John Deere was the number one theft target in 2012, followed by Kubota Tractor Corp, Bobcat, Caterpillar and Toro.

— The top three states for heavy equipment thefts in 2012? Texas ranked first with 1,401 reported thefts, followed by North Carolina with 1,037 thefts, and Florida with 890 thefts.

The report also looks into heavy equipment recoveries in 2012 and here comes the sticker shock for insurers.

According to the NICB, only 20 percent of heavy equipment stolen in 2012 was found, making it a costly crime for insurance companies, equipment owners and rental agencies.

Bear in mind that annual estimates of the cost of equipment theft vary from around $300 million to $1 billion, with most estimates in the range of $400 million.

But, these estimates do not include the theft of tools or building materials or damage to equipment and premises caused during a theft, or losses from business interruption, such as the cost of rentals, project-delay penalties, and wasted workforce and management time.

The NICB says the area that needs the most improvement is also the one that promises immediate results: making accurate information available to law enforcement 24 hours a day.

It notes:

At a minimum, equipment owners should keep accurate lists of equipment with PIN/serial numbers and submit them to law enforcement, their insurers, and NER as soon they discover a theft. When they purchase equipment, owners should register serial numbers in the NER database, so that the information is available to law enforcement 24 hours a day. In the event of a theft, law enforcement can identify the equipment, even during weekends or at night.†

All Hail the Data

A report from the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) has revealed that insurance claims resulting from hailstorm damage in the United States increased by a whopping 84 percent from 2010 to 2012.

In 2010, there were 467,602 hail damage claims filed, but by 2012 that number had  jumped  to 861,597.

All told, over two million hail damage claims were processed from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2012, the NICB said.

Perhaps not surprisingly the top five states generating hail damage claims during this period were Texas (320,823); Missouri (138,857); Kansas (126,490); Colorado (118,118) and Oklahoma (114,168).

“Personal Property Homeowners† (PPHO) was the policy type most affected by hail loss claims, with 1.3 million, or 64 percent of the total number of hail loss claims between 2010 and 2012.

On average, PPHO policies were represented more than twice as often as the next most popular policy type, personal automobile.

NICB points out that most of the hail loss claims occurred in the spring and summer months, between March and July, likely due to increased numbers of thunderstorms during this period.

So far, large hail reports posted to NOAA’s National Weather Service Storm Prediction Center site in 2013 appear to show that hailstorm activity is down from 2012. See below:

 

While the NICB report focuses just on hail claims, it’s worth adding that severe thunderstorms in the U.S., including tornadoes, resulted in $14.9 billion in insured losses in 2012, more than $25 billion in insured losses in 2011, and $9.5 billion in insured losses in 2010, according to Munich Re.

In the first-half of 2013, insured losses from thunderstorm events exceeded $6 billion, Munich Re said.