Tag Archives: Piracy

Maritime Piracy Falls, But Dangers Remain

Piracy on the world’s seas has reached a five-year low, with 297 ships attacked in 2012, compared with 439 in 2011, the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) International Maritime Bureau (IMB) global piracy report revealed today.

Worldwide  numbers  fell  thanks to a huge reduction in Somali piracy, though East and West Africa remain the worst hit areas, with 150 attacks in 2012, according to the IMB report.

Globally, 174 ships were boarded by pirates last year, while 28 were hijacked and 28 were fired upon. IMB’s Piracy Reporting Centre also recorded 67 attempted attacks.

The number of people taken hostage onboard fell to 585 from 802 in 2011, while a further 26 were kidnapped for ransom in Nigeria. Six crewmembers were killed and 32 were injured or assaulted.

A press release cites Captain Pottengal Mukundan, Director of IMB:

IMB’s piracy figures show a welcome reduction in hijackings and attacks to ships. But crews must remain vigilant, particularly in the highly dangerous waters off East and West Africa.†

In Somalia and the Gulf of Aden, just 75 ships reported attacks in 2012 compared with 237 in 2011, accounting for 25% of incidents worldwide. The number of Somali hijackings was halved from 28 in 2011 to 14 last year.

IMB says navies are deterring piracy off Africa’s east coast, with pre-emptive strikes and robust action against mother ships. So too are private armed security teams and crews’ application of “Best Management Practices†.

But the threat and capability of heavily armed Somali pirates remains strong.

Follow the IMB record of piracy and armed robbery incidents on Twitter and view latest attacks on the IMB Live Piracy Map.

The Washington Post has more on this story.

Maritime Piracy At Record Levels

Today we take to the high seas to bring you latest reports of a surge in world piracy attacks and the resulting cost to the economy.

The number of people taken hostage at sea and the number of vessels taken in 2010 rose to record levels, according to  annual  data  from the ICC International Maritime Bureau’s Piracy Reporting Centre (IMB).

Pirates captured 1,181 seafarers in 2010, up 12.5 percent from 1,050 in 2009, while a total of 53 ships were hijacked in 2010, of which all but four occurred off the coast of Somalia. Eight crewmembers died in these incidents.

Overall, ships reported 445 pirate attacks in 2010, up 10 percent from 2009, the IMB said.

The IMB describes the continued increase in these numbers as “alarming†:

As a percentage of global incidents, piracy on the high seas has increased dramatically over armed robbery in territorial waters.†

Hijackings off the coast of Somalia accounted for 92 percent of all ship seizures last year, with 49 vessels hijacked and 1,016 crew members taken hostage. A total of 28 vessels and 638 hostages were still being held for ransom by Somali pirates as of 31 December 2010.

While attacks off the coast of Somalia remain high, the good news is that the number of incidents in the Gulf of Aden more than halved last year, with 53 attacks in 2010 down from 117 in 2009.

The IMB attributed the reduction to the deterrence work of naval forces that have been patrolling the area since 2008 and to ships’ application of self-protection measures.

An article in the Washington Post has more on this story. Follow the IMB record of  piracy and armed robbery incidents  on Twitter and view latest attacks  on the IMB Live Piracy Map.

Meanwhile, Insurance Journal reports that a new study from think tank One Earth Future (OEF), estimates that maritime piracy cost the international economy between $7 billion and $12 billion in 2010.

OEF’s calculation includes costs related to ransoms, insurance premiums, re-routing ships, security equipment, naval forces, prosecutions, anti-piracy organizations, and cost to regional economies. OEF noted that the numbers could change substantially as the economy rebounds from the current economic recession.