Tag Archives: sigma

Lower First Half Cat Losses, But Higher Percentage Insured

While total economic losses from natural catastrophes and man-made disaster events remain far below-average in the first half of 2015, the global insurance and reinsurance industry is covering a higher than average percentage of those losses.

That’s the key takeaway from preliminary sigma estimates of global catastrophe losses for the first half of 2015, just released by Swiss Re.

Of the $37 billion in total economic losses from disaster events in the first half of 2015, the global insurance and reinsurance industry covered nearly 45 percent, or $16.5 billion, of these losses.

This is higher than the previous 10-year average of 27 percent covered by the global re/insurance industry.

Of the overall insured losses in the first half of 2015, $12.9 billion came from natural disasters, down from nearly $20 billion in first half 2014, and again below the average first-half year loss of the previous 10 years ($25 billion).

Man-made disasters triggered an additional $3.6 billion in insured losses in the first half of 2015, sigma said.

So why did insurance and reinsurance cover a higher proportion of global catastrophe losses in the first half?

The answer lies in the location of the most costly insured natural catastrophes losses for the insurance industry in the first half of 2015–thunderstorms in the United States and winter storm losses in Europe.

These larger loss events, as well as the severe winter weather in North America, all contributed to the  lower percentage of uninsured losses through the first half of the year.

Here’s the Swiss Re chart showing the dollar breakout of insured and uninsured catastrophe-related losses from 2005 through 2015:

CatastropheLossesInsuredandUninsured

Note: insured losses + uninsured losses= total economic losses

But, as Artemis blog reports here, sadly the lower proportion of uninsured losses is not related to any major increase in insurance penetration.

The Nepal earthquakes provide a striking example. While economic losses from the quakes are estimated at $5 billion, only around $160 million were insured.

In the words of Kurt Karl, chief economist at Swiss Re:

The tragic events in Nepal are a reminder of the utility of insurance. Insurance cover does not lessen the emotional trauma that natural catastrophes inflict, but it can help people better manage the financial fallout from disasters so they can start to rebuild their lives.”

Check out Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) facts and statistics on global catastrophes.

Winter Storms and Thunderstorms Top 2014 Most Costly Cats

Natural catastrophes and man-made disasters cost insurers $34 billion in 2014, down 24 percent from $45 billion in 2013, according to just-released Swiss Re sigma preliminary estimates.

Of the $34 billion tab for insurers, some $29 billion was triggered by natural catastrophe events (compared with $37 billion in 2013), while man-made disasters generated the additional $5 billion in insured losses in 2014.

Despite total losses coming in at below annual averages, the United States still accounted for three of the most costly insured catastrophe losses for the year, with two thunderstorm events and one winter storm event causing just shy of $6 billion in insured losses (see chart below).

sigma_prel_cat_estimates_fig1

In mid-May, a spate of strong storms with large hail stones hit many parts of the U.S. over a five-day period resulting in insured losses of $2.9 billion — the highest of the year.

Extreme winter storms at the beginning of 2014 caused insured losses of $1.7 billion, above the average full-year winter storm loss number of $1.1 billion of the previous 10 years, sigma said.

Total economic losses from disaster events in 2014 reached $113 billion worldwide, according to sigma estimates, and around 11,000 people lost their lives in those events.

Ongoing events and revisions to estimates for previous ones may further change the 2014 loss outcomes, sigma noted, as this data includes updates to source data made by 28 November 2014 only.

More on global catastrophe losses from the I.I.I. here.

Swiss Re: May Thunderstorms Most Costly Insured Nat Cat In H1 2014

Natural catastrophe events in the United States accounted for three of the five most costly insured catastrophe losses in the first half of 2014, according to just-released Swiss Re sigma estimates.

In mid-May, a spate of severe storms and hail hit many parts of the U.S.   over a five-day period, generating insured losses of $2.6 billion. Harsh spring weather also triggered thunderstorms and tornadoes, some of which caused insured claims of $1.1 billion.

The Polar Vortex in the U.S. in January also led to a long period of heavy snowfall and very cold temperatures in the east and southern states such as Mississippi and Georgia, resulting in combined insured losses of $1.7 billion.

SwissReH114NatCats_web

These three events contributed $5.4 billion of the $19 billion in natural catastrophe-related insured losses covered by the global insurance industry in the first half of 2014, according to sigma estimates.

The $19 billion was 10 percent down from the $21 billion covered by insurers for natural catastrophe events in the first half of 2013. It was also below the average first-half year loss of the previous 10 years ($23 billion). Man-made disasters added $2 billion in insured losses in the first half of 2014, sigma reports.

The $21 billion in insured losses from disaster events in the first half of 2014 was 16 percent lower than the $25 billion generated in the first half of 2013, and lower than the average first-half year loss of the previous 10 years ($27 billion).

Total economic losses from natural catastrophes and man-made disasters reached $44 billion in the first half of 2014, according to sigma estimates.

More than 4,700 lives were lost as a result of natural catastrophes and man-made disasters in the first half of 2014.

Swiss Re on First Half Catastrophe Losses

While 2013 so far has  been a below-average catastrophe loss year for the global insurance industry, this could easily change in the coming months, Swiss Re warned yesterday.

Just-released sigma estimates put total economic losses from natural catastrophes and man-made disasters at $56 billion in the first half of 2013, of which $20 billion was insured.

Insured losses from natural catastrophes totaled $17 billion, with flooding a main driver.

In a press release, Kurt Karl, chief economist at Swiss Re says:

Though 2013 has so far been a below-average loss year, the severity of the ongoing North Atlantic hurricane season, and other disasters such as winter storms in Europe, could still increase insured losses for 2013 substantially.†

Flooding accounted for some $8 billion of the $17 billion in global insured losses from natural catastrophes in the first half.

As a result, 2013 is already the second most costly calendar year in terms of insured flood losses on sigma records.

Check out I.I.I. facts and statistics on global catastrophes here.

In other news, the late summer  edition of Cavalcade of Risk, a round-up of risk related posts from around the blogosphere, is now live over at My Personal Finance Journey. Our recent post on cyber insurance is among the featured posts.