Tag Archives: Specialty

Need For Political Risk Coverage Accelerates

Amid ongoing political upheaval in Venezuela and a volatile geopolitical landscape elsewhere, the need for political risk insurance is rising to prominence for multinational companies.

AP reports that General Motors just became the latest corporation to have a factory or asset seized by the government of Venezuela.

GM said assets such as vehicles were taken from the plant causing the company irreparable damage.

To protect themselves against loss or damage to physical assets caused by political action and instability, businesses should consider purchasing political risk insurance.

This specialty type of insurance can protect against a variety of risks, including:

  • Expropriation
  • Political violence (including terrorism and war).
  • Currency inconvertibility.
  • Non-payment.
  • Contract frustration due to political events.

Due to the accelerating pace of geopolitical uncertainty, the market for political risk insurance is pushing toward $10 billion in 2018, up from $8.1 billion in 2015, according to a KPMG LLP report published last year.

Willis Towers Watson advises multinational companies to buy political risk coverage on operations worldwide — particularly for select regions —while it is still available, Business Insurance reports.

Political risk insurance is available from both private insurers and from government-backed insurers, including the Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC), an agency of the U.S. government.

Aon’s Political Risk Map 2017 captures changing risks for businesses and countries across emerging and frontier markets.

Last year an equal number of countries showed a reduction in political risk as showed an increase, a trend which highlights the persistence of political risk across the globe, Aon said.

Flaming Insurance

No, we’re not talking insurance for damage or loss to property because of fire. This type of flaming insurance helps businesses recover when unflattering information that hurts their brand or image goes viral online.

Asia Insurance Review reports that Sompo Japan has started selling “enjo” insurance (flaming insurance) coverage to compensate a target of “enjo” (widespread flaming of a target due to negative rumors or scandals.)

Sompo’s new product – a first of its kind in Japan – will compensate any target of “enjo” whether or not the rumors are groundless or based on fact.

In the event of a viral outbreak, Sompo will cover expenses for a positive media campaign, research into why the negativity began, and the cost of public apologies if needed.

Coverage could be useful for businesses suddenly the target of unwanted social media attention. For example, as RocketNews24 reports, McDonald’s Japan had to deal with a long-burning enjo after a tainted chicken scandal.

What’s the cost of this coverage? Premiums will run from JPY500,000 to JPY600,000 ($4,343-$5,213).

Rolling Stone Defamation Case Highlights Insurance Need

As the Rolling Stone defamation case moves into the damages phase today, media businesses everywhere—and their insurers—will be watching closely.

A federal jury on Friday found that Rolling Stone magazine, its parent company Wenner Media and Sabrina Rubin Erdely, the author of a discredited 2014 article about an alleged gang rape at the University of Virginia, were liable for defaming Nicole Eramo, a former associate dean of students at the school.

According to this Wall Street Journal report, Ms. Eramo is seeking $7.5 million but the award could potentially go higher.

Rolling Stone also faces a defamation suit brought by the UVA chapter of the fraternity Phi Kappa Psi, the focus of the 2014 article. That case is seeking $25 million.

The verdict against Rolling Stone is the second large media liability claim this year.

In June, a jury awarded $140 million in damages to the former professional wrestler known as Hulk Hogan in an invasion-of-privacy case against Gawker Media Group over the publication of a sex tape.

Gawker settled the lawsuit just last week agreeing to pay the wrestling star, whose actual name is Terry Bollea, $31 million. Gawker was forced into bankruptcy and sold to Univision in August.

The cases have prompted legal experts to express concerns over the increasing frequency with which complaints about journalism are being settled in the “unpredictable and expensive sphere of the courts”, according to this New York Times article.

From the insurance perspective, the cases underscore how important it is for online and traditional publishers, broadcasters and other media-related firms to purchase media liability insurance.

This specialist type of errors and omissions (E&O) insurance protects creators of content against liability claims resulting from a range of exposures, including, but not limited to, defamation, invasion of privacy, infringement of copyright, and plagiarism.

While there is a fair amount of media liability insurance sold (an estimated $300 million to $500 million in the United States, and $50 million elsewhere (mostly in the United Kingdom)), according to this 2016 survey by Betterley Risk Consultants, further growth is predicted:

“We suspect that much of the media market is untapped risk, self-assumed by large organizations that can afford to self-insure, or ignored by small organizations that don’t think they are exposed.”

In the case of Rolling Stone, its parent company Wenner Media, is reported to have an undisclosed amount of media liability insurance to cover any damages related to the trial.

Still, at least one analyst cited in this report by the Wall Street Journal, says that if costs related to this lawsuit and other pending lawsuits exceed $50 million, Wenner Media may not be able to fund it with existing resources.

Check out I.I.I. resources on E&O insurance for small businesses here.

Faster Decisions, Fewer Challenges Among Cyber Buyers

Good news for cyber insurers. A majority of companies continue to have network security and data privacy insurance, and are making their purchase decisions faster and experiencing fewer purchasing challenges than in 2015.

The findings come in the newly-released 2016 Network Security and Data Privacy Study by Wells Fargo Insurance.

While in 2015 the study showed that 22 percent of companies buying insurance took more than 12 months to make the purchase decision, in 2016 just 8 percent of companies are currently taking that long, while 59 percent are taking six months or less.

Cost of coverage and finding a policy that meets a company’s needs remain the top two insurance purchasing challenges of 2016. However, the study found that 19 percent of companies did not experience any purchasing challenges, a significant improvement over 2015 when only 6 percent did not experience challenges.

The easier purchasing process may be related to less internal resistance, Wells Fargo said. Likewise, in 2016, fewer companies (24 percent) believed the risk was not big enough to warrant the purchase of network security and data privacy insurance.

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Of the companies in the study that had purchased insurance, one-fifth reported filing a network security and data privacy insurance claim in the last 12 months, and most were satisfied with their coverage.

Another key takeaway for cyber insurers? Protecting the business against financial loss was the primary reason for purchasing coverage (81 percent) in 2016, as in 2015. However, protecting the company’s reputation is an increasing concern, with 70 percent citing it in 2016, compared to just 58 percent in 2015.

Purchasing insurance is an important step, but it should be used in tandem with developing and testing a comprehensive incident response plan and performing a thorough cyber risk assessment, Wells Fargo noted.

The second annual study analyzed trends of network security and data privacy issues among 100 decision makers at companies with $100 million or more in annual revenue.

Check out Insurance Information Institute’s (I.I.I.’s) latest white paper on cyber risk threats and challenges here.

Employment Matters Cost

If you’re a small or medium-sized business with fewer than 500 employees you might think that none of your employees would file discrimination charges against your company.

But a just-released survey by Hiscox dispels that myth, showing just how costly employment matters can be for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs)–and how important it is to have employment practices liability (EPL) insurance.

A representative study of 446 closed claims reported by SMEs with fewer than 500 employees found that some 19 percent of employment charges resulted in defense and settlement costs averaging a total of $125,000. On average, those matters took 275 days to resolve, Hiscox found.

While the average self-insured retention (deductible) for these charges was $35,000, without employment practices liability insurance, these companies would have been out of pocket by an extra $90,000, Hiscox said.

“Most employment matters don’t end up in court, but for those that do, the damages can be substantial,” Hiscox noted.

Its survey cites data showing the median judgment is approximately $200,000, which is in addition to the cost of defense. About 25 percent of cases result in a judgment of $500,000 or more.

Where a business is located can make a big difference in the potential employment exposure it faces.

The 2015 Hiscox Employee Lawsuit Handbook found states with the highest risk of employees filing lawsuits are: New Mexico (66 percent higher than national average), Washington DC (65 percent higher), Nevada (47 percent higher), Alabama (41 percent higher) and California (40 percent higher).

Overall, U.S.-based companies of all sizes have at least an 11.7 percent chance of having an employment charge filed against them, Hiscox found.

Claims Journal has more on this story here.

Wondering what’s covered by EPL insurance? The Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) explains all here.

 

Cyber Business Interruption Risk Often Underestimated

Corporate data breaches and privacy concerns may dominate the headlines, but a new report by Allianz Global Corporate & Specialty makes the case that future cyber threats will come from business interruption (BI), intellectual property theft and cyber extortion.

The impact of BI from a cyber attack, or from operational or technical failure, is a risk that is often underestimated, according to Allianz.

It predicts that BI costs could be equal to–or even exceed–direct losses from a data breach, and says that business interruption exposures are particularly significant in sectors such as telecoms, manufacturing, transport, media and logistics.

Vulnerability of industrial control systems (ICS) to attack poses a significant threat, Allianz says.

To-date, there have been accounts of centrifuges and power plants being manipulated, such as the 2012 malware attack that disabled tens of thousands of computers at oil company Saudi Aramco, disrupting operations for a week.

However, the damage could be much higher from security sensitive facilities such as nuclear power plants, laboratories, water suppliers or large hospitals.

Business interruption can also be caused by technical failure or human error, Allianz notes.

For example, in July 2015, stocks worth $28 trillion were suspended for several hours on the New York Stock Exchange due to a computer glitch, and that same month 4,900 United Airlines flights were impacted by a network connectivity issue.

As a result, Allianz believes that within the next five to 10 years BI will be seen as a key risk and a major element of the cyber insurance landscape.

It points out that in the context of cyber and IT risks, BI cover can be very broad including business IT computer systems, but also extending to ICS used by energy companies or robots used in manufacturing.

Allianz currently estimates the cyber insurance market is worth around $2 billion in premium worldwide, with U.S. business accounting for around 90 percent of the market. However, the cyber market is expected to experience double-digit growth year-on-year and could reach in excess of $20 billion in the next 10 years.

The Allianz  Cyber Risk Guide  is available here.

Check out I.I.I. facts and statistics on cybercrime here.

Insurance Responds To Rising Costs of Food Recalls

You may have read that the Justice Department is warning food manufacturers that they could face criminal and civil penalties if they poison their customers with contaminated food.

Recent high profile food recalls, such as the one at Texas-based Blue Bell Creameries and another at Ohio-based Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams, have drawn attention to this issue once again.

Now a new report by Swiss Re finds that the number of food recalls per year in the United States has almost doubled since 2002, while the costs are also rising.

Half of all food recalls cost the affected companies more than $10 million each and losses of up to $100 million are possible, Swiss Re says. These figures exclude the reputational damage that may take years for a company to recover from.

Contaminated food also takes a financial toll on the public sector. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, costs for the U.S. public health system from hospitalized patients and lost wages in 2013 alone was $15.6 billion. In total, 8.9 million people fell ill from the 15 pathogens tracked, with over 50,000 hospitalized and 2,377 fatalities.

Demographic change is putting more sensitive consumer groups at risk. Ageing societies, an increase in allergies in the overall population and the fact that malnourishment is still prevalent in many countries are significant drivers of the increase in exposure, Swiss Re notes.

Which brings us to insurance.

A variety of insurance products are available to help companies protect their bottom line from this potentially catastrophic exposure.

Product recall/contaminated product insurance will cover the costs of recalling accidentally or maliciously contaminated food from the market, and impaired or mislabeled products that cause bodily injury, sickness, disease or death.

Product liability insurance also provides compensation of third party liability claims for bodily injury and property damage caused by an impaired product.

As Roland Friedli, risk engineer at Swiss Re and co-author of the report says:

Food recalls can be caused by something as simple as a labeling error on the packaging, or as complex as a microbial contamination somewhere along a vast globalized supply chain. Yet event a simple mistake can cost a food manufacturer millions in losses and even more in terms of reputation. Insurance and sound risk management are essential for keeping affected businesses afloat.”

Further information on product liability, recall and contamination insurance and is available from the Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) here.

How To Insure A $120 Million Horse

The Kentucky Derby is upon us and insurers are more than just spectators at this major sporting event.

Bloodstock and equestrian insurance is big business with underwriters who specialize in offering tailored protection for high value animals.

Consider the staggering values at stake. A BloombergBusiness article by Mason Levinson tells the tale of American thoroughbred racehorse Tapit.

Tapit began his stud career with an initial stallion fee of $15,000. That fee has soared 20-fold in the past decade and in 2015 Tapit will generate over $30 million for his owners.

Why?

Tapit’s offspring tend to win races.

As  Bloomberg reports:

By 2009, his offspring’s racetrack earnings placed him 28th on a national ranking of stallions, according to data compiled by the Bloodhorse. He climbed to 12th the next year, then third in 2011 and first in 2014, a position he has maintained over the first four months of this year.”

One of Tapit’s sons, Frosted, is a top contender in Saturday’s Kentucky Derby.

Today, Tapit’s total value is estimated at about $120 million, the article reports.

Luckily, there’s insurance for that. Whether you own racehorses, stallions, broodmares, or showjumpers, insurers are able to tailor a policy that meets your needs.

A bloodstock insurance policy typically would cover a number of different risks.

For example, all risks mortality would cover the value of the animal if it dies as a result of accident, disease or illness. Theft can also be covered, as well as loss of use (covering financial loss) and public liability.

If you run an equine breeding program, permanent infertility insurance is another important coverage. Stallions are the “calling card” of a major farm and can be synonymous with the farm’s name and reputation.

If a stallion becomes permanently impotent, infertile, or incapable of serving mares, it can be a huge setback for the owner, breeder or shareholder. This important coverage protects one of their most valuable assets.

Perhaps one of the most high-profile equine insurance claims over the years involved the death of thoroughbred Alydar in 1990. Check out this Blood-Horse feature article by Tom Dixon,  the Lloyd’s of London  insurance adjuster who was first on the scene when Alydar was found in his stall at Calumet Farm with a broken leg.

Public Entities Targeted By Cyber Attacks

Cyber attacks against businesses may dominate the news headlines, but recent events point to the growing number and range of cyber threats facing public entities and government agencies.

City officials yesterday confirmed that city and county computer systems in Madison, Wisconsin were being targeted by cyber attackers in retaliation for the shooting death of Tony Robinson, an unarmed biracial man, by a Madison police officer last Friday. A Reuters report says the cyber attack is thought to have been initiated by hacker group Anonymous.

Then on Sunday the website of Colonial Williamsburg was hit in a cyber attack attributed to ISIS. The attack targeted the history.org website and comes just a week after the living history museum offered to house artifacts at risk of destruction in Iraq.

Meanwhile, Florida’s top law enforcement agency is reported to be investigating testing delays in public school districts caused by cyber attacks on the Florida Standards Assessment (FSA) testing system.

And a recent cyber attack at multiple New York City agencies including the office of the NYC mayor recently took down computer systems for most of a day.

There are many more examples.

Given the large amounts of confidential data held by public entities and government agencies, it’s not surprising that they are a target for cyber attacks.

Last year data breaches in the government/military sector accounted for 11.7 percent of U.S. breach incidents, according to the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC).

A GAO report here points to the cyber security risk to Federal agencies and critical infrastructure.

In a viewpoint at American City & County blog, Robin Leal, underwriting director at Travelers Public Sector Services recently warned of the growing cyber risks facing public sector organizations.

Leal cited data from a survey at the 2014 Public Risk Management Conference and 2014 National Association of Counties (NACo) conference showing that public officials’ confidence in their cyber protections is alarmingly low.

Only 13 percent of respondents to the survey were “very confident” that their public entity has adequate protection against cyber threats.

As well as written policies and procedures to handle cyber threats, Leal said public entities should consider cyber insurance.

Only 10 percent of current public sector clients add cyber protections to existing insurance policies, and for the majority of new business submissions cyber insurance is not part of their current coverage, Leal noted.

Check out the I.I.I. white paper Cyber Risks: The Growing Threat.

Covering All Manner of Celebrity Falls

As a longtime Madonna fan and as a parent of two young cape-wearing superheroes, I was concerned to read of the 56-year-old star’s fall on stage — view here — during the closing performance at the UK’s Brit Awards earlier this week.

The Queen of Pop apparently suffered whiplash in the incident as she was dragged backwards when the tightly tied Armani cape she was wearing wouldn’t come undone.

Madonna managed to go on with the show, but it’s good to know that if she hadn’t there’s insurance for that.

From providing appearance/event cancellation coverage, to insuring celebrity body parts, to writing death and disgrace policies, specialist insurers play a major role in providing protection to the stars — and the companies that promote and sponsor them.

For example, through the years the Lloyd’s insurance market has insured a long line of celebrities and celebrity body parts.

This Lloyd’s article notes that Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards’ hands were insured for $1.6 million, while Marlene Dietrich insured her voice for $1 million and actress Bette Davis once insured her waistline against expansion to the tune of $28,000.

More recently, in 2006, soccer giant David Beckham’s legs were insured for £100 million and in 2007, Ugly Betty television star America Ferrera’s smile was insured for $10 million.

Whether a musician, sports star, TV personality, or a top chef, each celebrity risk profile comes with its own unique set of risks, according to the individual’s occupation, health, lifestyle and associated risks.

Another type of celebrity fall from grace is covered by  a recently launched product from AIG’s Lexington Insurance Company. Known as Celebrity Product RecallResponse, the new product covers companies in the event of a celebrity endorser’s public fall from grace, scandal or unexpected death.

Basically, the product covers certain costs incurred by companies to recall products bearing a celebrity endorser’s name and image.

AIG says the insurance is triggered when “significant news media coverage of an endorser’s actual or alleged criminal act or other distasteful conduct that results in (or is likely to result in) public contempt for the individual and a significant adverse impact on a company’s product.”

As Jeremy Johnson, president and CEO of Lexington Insurance Company, notes:

In this age of social media and instant news, reports of indiscretions by celebrities or high profile athletes can spread worldwide instantly, with swift, adverse implications for products or brands associated with the individual.”

Just another example of how innovative insurance can be.