Tag Archives: Tech

InsurTech disruption: threat or opportunity?

Whether you’re an InsurTech startup with new ideas or an incumbent concerned about protecting your book of business, the greatest risk you can take may be to resist collaboration, according to a post on Willis Towers Watson Wire.

In Threat vs Opportunity? InsurTech is largely a matter of perspective, Andrew Newman, president and global head of casualty at Willis Re, says while it’s understandable that many insurers have perceived InsurTech as a threat to the value chain, the biggest threat lies not in technology itself, but in competitors of any description leveraging these innovations to gain advantage by reducing risk and lowering costs.

“The plain fact is that the vast majority of InsurTech companies aren’t interested in going to war with incumbents. Their focus is on creating value within the insurance value chain – not collapsing it. So if incumbents embrace ‘disruption’, rather than concentrating on defending themselves by keeping these opportunities at arm’s length, then they will find that the available technology is largely complementary to most of the current processes in the industry.”

Download the presentation Insurance: Leading Through Disruption by Insurance Information Institute president and CEO Sean Kevelighan to find out more about how the industry is poised to lead through disruption.

Insurers Innovating To Prevent Driver Distraction

The distracted driving epidemic, and its impact on highway accidents and the cost of auto insurance, continues to be all over the news.

A 2016 underwriting loss of $7 billion for State Farm’s auto insurance business, announced earlier this week, prompted the latest wave of headlines (see Bloomberg report).

Smartphones and gadgets and screens installed in new cars are two major sources of distraction, the Wall Street Journal recently reported.

While technology is part of the problem, it is also part of the solution (see earlier T+C post). A number of insurers are already partnering with technology companies to offer solutions to prevent distracted driving.

Digital Insurance features some of the latest technologies introduced by insurers here. The list includes a distracted driving simulator brought into schools as part of Arbella Insurance’s Distractology program, as well as apps that integrate with usage-based insurance programs to curb distracted driving (see here and here).

An Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) white paper on how more auto accidents and larger claims are driving costs higher is available here.

I.I.I. advice on how to keep your auto insurance affordable here.

Insurers Active In Auto Crash Prevention Efforts

2016 may have been the deadliest year on the roads since 2007, with an estimated cost to society of $432 billion, according to preliminary data released by the National Safety Council (NSC).

“As many as 40,000 people died in motor vehicle crashes in 2016, a 6 percent increase over 2015 and a 14 percent increase over 2014—the most dramatic two-year escalation in 53 years.”

A recent Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) white paper on personal auto insurance offered this prescient warning:

“There has been an alarming increase in crashes and claims reported. This, combined with the cost of the claims themselves, has led to a dramatic rise in the overall loss cost.”

And:

Technology is both improving and complicating matters, making vehicles safer but at the same time amplifying possible driver distractions, as discussed in this New York Times article.

The NSC call for life-saving measures, includes:

Extend laws banning all cell phone use – including hands-free – to all drivers, not just teens; upgrade enforcement from secondary to primary in states with existing bans.

I.I.I. tips on how to keep your auto insurance affordable here.

From 1 To 100: Re(insurer) Tech Investments Soar

Who says insurers and reinsurers aren’t tech savvy? CB Insights reports that (re)insurers made 100 strategic investments in private tech companies in 2016, up from a single investment just four years prior.

Wow, that’s an increase of 9,900 percent.

Cybersecurity, digital insurance distribution, IoT and property management software are some of the tech areas where insurers and reinsurers are investing, according to CB Insights data.

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U.S.-based tech startups attracted 65 percent of (re)insurer investment between 2015 and 2016, while France, China, the United Kingdom and Germany also saw deals.

Munich Re and HSB, XL Catlin’s XL Innovate, Liberty Mutual, Mass Mutual and Assurant are just some of the reinsurance and insurance companies investing in tech startups either directly or via their corporate venture arms.

This is just one of the ways that insurers are leveraging technology, and more specifically data and analytics, into their business.

At the recent Insurance Information Institute Joint Industry Forum, property/casualty insurance leaders identified technology as one of the most important issues for the industry in 2017.

This post by the I.I.I. Insuring California blog talks about how Silicon Valley’s Plug and Play is connecting insurers with the startup ecosystem.

Diverse Strategies As Insurers Embrace Digital Innovation

The routes to a digital future are many and varied, but for insurers the question is how to get there?

A new survey by Willis Towers Watson of 200 senior-level insurance executives offers some insight into the way forward.

The findings suggest that M&A and partnerships are likely to trump internal investment as insurers look to deliver digital transformation.

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Almost half (45 percent) of respondents to the survey signaled a clear preference for acquisitions as the way forward to gain digital capabilities.

By contrast, fewer than one in five insurers (17 percent) said they have a preference for internal development.

That’s not to say that internal innovation efforts have no place at these insurers, according to Willis Towers Watson, it’s more about getting the balance right between organic and inorganic growth.

Well over one-third (38 percent) of survey respondents say they have no preference between the two routes. In other words, they will use both acquisitions and internal innovation as the circumstances suit.

As insurers embrace a more outwards-looking approach to innovation, the survey suggests that traditional M&A deals are not the only option.

As Willis Towers Watson says:

“Many insurers are investing in a disparate range of technologies via venture capital funds – either through their own in-house venture capital arms, or third-party funds. This may be an attractive way to make a number of small bets on nascent innovations, rather than betting the house on an as-yet unproven technology.”

The survey found that one-third (31 percent) of respondents from the property/casualty insurance sector have set up a corporate venture arm already, while another third (32 percent) are considering doing so.

Innovation was a key topic of discussion at the Insurance Information Institute Property/Casualty Insurance Joint Industry Forum held yesterday in New York. For coverage of the forum go to the I.I.I. website.

Growing P/C Innovation Amid InsurTech, Trump Disruption

The pace of innovation in the U.S. property/casualty industry will accelerate in 2017, as technology advances and the growth of InsurTech raise customer expectations for greater innovation and new business models, according to a new report by Ernst & Young.

In its 2017 U.S. Property/Casualty Insurance Outlook, EY says the industry is at an inflection point, as continued economic headwinds provide little support for insurers plagued by shrinking investment incomes, escalating claims costs and rising regulations.

A new Trump administration raises the prospect of further economic and regulatory change and with the P/C industry in flux, this is a good time for CEOs to think through their future business strategies, EY suggests.

As insurers look to adapt to disruptive market shifts, EY expects companies will do more to develop a culture of innovation in 2017:

“The Internet of Things, telematics, artificial intelligence, driverless cars and blockchain have the potential to transform industry fundamentals and even redefine the nature of risk. In the future, competing for market share will be increasingly dependent on technology, data and analytics.”

With more than 1,000 InsurTech startups in operation, the pace of P/C innovation will speed up next year.

For example, in 2017 InsurTech startup Trov plans to roll out on-demand insurance that will enable customers to use their smart phones to turn coverage for personal belongings on and off. Trov is an example of how product innovation directed towards millennials could disrupt the P/C insurance model, EY says.

“Incumbents will be watching this space closely, creating venture funding groups that are actively monitoring and investing in InsurTech initiatives.”

Insurers will take digital transformation to the next level in 2017, expanding their use of robotics and advanced analytics across most aspects of their business, from claims handling and underwriting to customer relationship management (CRM) systems and risk management, according to EY’s outlook.

See our earlier blog post for latest data on the InsurTech sector.

Read about the top InsurTech deals of the year as reported by Insurance Networking News here.

Catching All The Candy

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If your little monsters are determined to hunt down some spooky Pokémon on their trick-or-treat route this Halloween, be sure that the fun of finding Ghastly or Haunter doesn’t turn into a deadly distraction.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that Halloween is consistently one of the top three days for pedestrian injuries and fatalities, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that children are four times more likely to be struck by a motor vehicle on Halloween than on any other day of the year.

Excited trick-or-treaters often forget about safety, the American Automobile Association (AAA) warns, so motorists and parents must be even more alert.

The AAA offers these tips to keep young ones safe on Halloween.

Meanwhile, Pokémon GO’s virtual Halloween update is reportedly drawing players back to the mobile app that took the world by storm earlier this summer.

While catching all the candy could be a healthy alternative to eating all the candy, there are also some side effects that could prove hazardous.

Researchers at San Diego State University and UC San Diego found about 113,000 total incidences of a driver, passenger or pedestrian distracted by Pokémon GO in their review of Twitter postings over just a 10-day period (July 10 through July 19, 2016).

There were also 14 unique crashes—1 player drove his car into a tree—attributed to Pokémon GO in news reports during the same period.

The researchers noted that by rewarding movement Pokémon GO incentivizes physical activity.

“However, if players use their cars to search for Pokémon they negate any health benefit and incur serious risk.”

The study was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The good news is that injuries and property damage resulting from distracted Pokémon GO users are for the most part covered by insurance, according to the Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.).

In its smart road tips for Halloween safety, Consumer Reports advises the public not to use a cell phone or other mobile device while driving and to pull over safely to check voice messages or texts.

Check out I.I.I. facts and statistics on highway safety and distracted driving here.

Wishing all our readers a safe and happy Halloween!

Disaster Preparedness? There’s an App for That

Research tells us that 40 percent of Americans use their smartphone to look up government services or information, so if you’re charging your mobile devices in preparation for Tropical Storm Hermine you might want to download the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) updated disaster app.

The free FEMA app now lets you receive weather alerts from the National Weather Service, so you can get alerts on severe weather happening anywhere in the country even if your phone is not located in the area. This makes it easy to track severe weather—such as a hurricane—that may be threatening you, your family and friends.

Other features of the FEMA app that will help you weather the storm include a customizable checklist of emergency supplies, maps of open shelters and disaster recovery centers, and tips on how to survive natural and man-made disasters.

Important features of the app for after the storm, include a disaster reporter where you can upload and share photos of damage and recovery efforts to help first responders, as well as easy access to apply for federal disaster assistance.

Craig Fugate, FEMA administrator:

“Emergency responders and disaster survivors are increasingly turning to mobile devices to prepare for, respond to and recover from disasters. This new feature empowers individuals to assist and support family and friends before, during, and after a severe weather event.”

The FEMA app is available for free in the Apple store for Apple devices and Google Play for Android devices.

Here at the Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) we also recommend you download our award-winning Know Your Plan app which helps you, your family and even your pets prepare to safely get out of harm’s way ahead of the storm.

In addition, the I.I.I. Know Your Stuff home inventory app allows you to keep an up-to-date record of your belongings so you’re fully covered in the event of an emergency.

Both I.I.I. apps are available for iPhone or Android.

Catching All The Customers

If you plan on trying to catch a Pikachu this weekend, chances are you might be lured into a local pizzeria or bookstore, as savvy businessowners tap into the huge popularity of Pokémon Go and target the pocket monster crowd to boost business.

Now reports say Niantic Labs, the developer of Pokémon Go, will soon accept sponsorship deals with global brands to make certain locations appear more prominently, or to sponsor specific products within the game.

Insurers looking to evolve their business are sure to be among those companies looking at potential Pokémon Go tie-ins to reach and expand their digital audience.

After all, AXA Insurance was among those to partner with Niantic Labs when Pokémon’s predecessor augmented reality adventure game, Ingress was launched in 2013.

The partnership saw AXA retail agencies in the real world turned into Ingress “Portals”, sites that players visit and battle to control for their in-game faction.

In just five months the success of the partnership saw over 600,000 Ingress players visit real world AXA Insurance locations to find, collect and deploy more than 5 million AXA-branded virtual shields in Ingress. AXA representatives also interacted with over 55,000 Ingress players during live player events called “Anomalies” opportunities.

Insurers are also not new to using augmented reality technology in their actual business operations.

For example, Zurich Insurance last year turned to augmented reality smartphone apps to train 10,000 employees in 170 countries in the key skills needed by its next generation of managers.

Insurers are also using augmented or virtual reality (think Google Glasses) to train claim adjusters and streamline the claims process.

So while the insurance risks of disruptive technology like Pokémon Go are clear (and yes, insurers have you covered), it appears there are many ways for insurers to embrace the power of augmented reality to benefit their business and market reach.

As the Celent insurance blog noted:

“For those insurers with investments in the real world like agencies, offices, billboards – and for those that are agile enough – this surprise trend could serve as a great marketing route to catching all the customers, as well as all the Pokémon.”

Self-Driving Cars Still Evolving

A fatal car accident involving a Tesla Model S in autonomous driving mode is drawing widespread scrutiny both in the United States and overseas.

Joshua Brown was killed in May this year when a tractor trailer made a left turn in front of his Tesla and the self-driving car failed to apply the brakes.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) said it is investigating the incident and will examine the design and performance of the automated driving systems in use at the time of the crash.

Its preliminary evaluation of the incident doesn’t indicate any conclusion about whether the Tesla vehicle was defective, the NHTSA said.

In a blog post, Tesla noted that this is the first known fatality in just over 130 million miles where autopilot was activated:

“Among all vehicles in the U.S., there is a fatality every 94 million miles. Worldwide, there is a fatality approximately every 60 million miles. It is important to emphasize that the NHTSA action is simply a preliminary evaluation to determine whether the system worked according to expectations.”

Tesla further noted that neither Autopilot nor the driver noticed the white side of the tractor trailer against a brightly lit sky, so the brake was not applied:

“The high ride height of the trailer combined with its positioning across the road and the extremely rare circumstances of the impact caused the Model S to pass under the trailer, with the bottom of the trailer impacting the windshield of the Model S.”

As companies continue to innovate and invest in self-driving technology, the crash indicates that fully automated cars are still a thing of the future.

The crash also raises important concerns over regulation.

According to this New York Times article:

“Even as companies conduct many tests on autonomous vehicles at both private facilities and on public highways, there is skepticism that the technology has progressed far enough for the government to approve cars that totally drive themselves.”

And the Wall Street Journal reports:

“Tesla now risks being the test case that could prompt new safety regulations or laws limiting the deployment of self-driving technology.”

The crash also highlights liability concerns regarding this emerging technology. Most car crashes are caused by human error, but presumably the NHTSA investigation will also evaluate potential product liability on the part of the manufacturer.

The crux of the issue is weighing up the risk of crashes versus crashes avoided via the use of self-driving technology.

As the Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) notes:

“As crash avoidance technology gradually becomes standard equipment, insurers will be able to better determine the extent to which these various components reduce the frequency and cost of accidents. They will also be able to determine whether the accidents that do occur lead to a higher percentage of product liability claims, as claimants blame the manufacturer or suppliers for what went wrong rather than their own behavior.”

Liability laws might evolve to ensure autonomous vehicle technology advances are not brought to a halt, the I.I.I. adds.