Tag Archives: Artificial Intelligence

Much Ado About AI at I.I.I. Joint Industry Forum

By Lucian McMahon

You’re familiar with the buzzwords by now. Internet of things. Blockchain. Artificial intelligence.

At the 2019 I.I.I. Joint Industry Forum, a panel on artificial intelligence and insurance cut through the buzz. How can AI be used to help build resilient communities? And how can the insurance industry leverage AI to better help customers address risk?

Pictured left to right: Andrew Robinson, Sean Ringsted, Ahmad Wani, Kyle Schmitt, James Roche

New products, more resilience

Regarding resilience, Ahmad Wani, CEO and co-founder of One Concern, said that AI is being used to harness vast troves of data to identify, on a “hyperlocal level,” the impact of a whole range of hazards. His company is already doing just that, partnering with local governments and insurance companies to better plan for future losses. “We don’t need to wait for disasters to happen to prioritize the response, we need to make changes and to act now before the disaster,” Wani said.

Sean Ringsted, executive vice president, chief digital officer and chief risk officer at the Chubb Group, also pointed out that insurers are already expanding their product offerings thanks to AI and big data. Contingent business interruption, for example: the sheer volume of data can now allow insurers to effectively analyze supply chain risks and price them accordingly.

Transparency and fairness are top of mind

But as Ringsted said, “it’s not all good news and roses.” What sorts of concerns should insurers and the public have about using AI?

Kyle Schmitt, managing direct of the global insurance practice at J.D. Power cited consumer concerns with the data and algorithms used for AI-enabled products. Consumers are deeply concerned with the security and privacy of any data they share with insurers. Per Schmitt, consumers also worry about the fairness of AI products, when algorithms instead of people are making decisions in an opaque way.

This is the so-called “black box problem” of AI, in which complex algorithms will arrive at answers or decisions without anyone being able to explain how they did so. Ringsted stressed that, for AI to be a viable tool, its mechanisms will need to be explainable to regulators and the public.

James Roche, vice president, personal lines product development at ISO, echoed this sentiment: social responsibility requires both robust data stewardship and strict control over AI outputs to ensure that outcomes are fair and within ethical standards.

From a consumer perspective, ensuring ethical use of AI is critical. Schmitt said that at the end of the day consumers are open-minded, “but they just want some ground rules.”

“Deepfakes”: a looming nightmare for insurers?

Picture a world where sophisticated machine-learning algorithms generate hyper-realistic video footage of you doing things you’ve never done and saying things you’ve never said.

If that sounds like a nightmare, I’ve got bad news for you. That world is increasingly our world. Those videos, called “deepfakes,” are already being created, often for unsavory purposes.

(You can watch a deepfake video of former president Obama giving a fake speech here.)

Anyone can download the software needed for DIY deepfake videos. And even though deepfake technology hasn’t yet been perfected, it’s getting better every day.

This has obvious implications for national security. Indeed, congressmen have already expressed concerns about the use of deepfakes as weapons of international intrigue.

What about insurance – could deepfakes be the next frontier of risk? It’s not hard to imagine some scenarios:

  • Cyber: A deepfaked audio recording of a CFO directs a company’s billing department to route thousands of dollars to a fake bank account.
  • Directors and officers: A deepfake video is created of a large corporation’s CEO reporting (fabricated) negative financial results, leading to a significant drop in the company’s stock.
  • Employment-practices liability: An employee is “deepfaked” to portray him making disparaging remarks about coworkers and engaging in harassment.
  • General liability: Someone creates a deepfake video of a person slipping in a grocery store and “injuring” herself, leading to allegations of negligence.

I’m sure you could think of a hundred more like these. How will we adapt to a world where video and audio can’t be trusted to tell the truth? What if deepfakes become too sophisticated to detect – how will this impact insurance claims and fraud prevention?

If the worst comes to pass, deepfakes could soon become an insurance nightmare.

But hopefully, the best case scenario happens instead: detection technology keeps up with deepfake advancements – and keeps everyone honest.

Highlights from the 2018 Society of Insurance Research Annual Conference

I recently spent two days (10/22-10/23) at the Society of Insurance Research (SIR) Annual Conference in New Orleans where a line-up of insurance executives and intelligence analysts talked about ways the insurance industry can leverage research, analytics, competitive intelligence and analysis techniques to get past the hype and develop effective strategies to move forward.

Here are just a few of the many interesting insights gathered at the extraordinarily intensive conference.

Digital Transformation

Implementing digital transformation will require an integrated approach across departments as well as a companywide culture shift. It will not work if executives are on-board but middle managers are not, said Robert Mozeika, Munich Re’s innovation executive.

Competitive intelligence

Competitive intelligence is not just about understanding what your competition is doing, but having a deep understanding ever changing market conditions, said Dr. Ben Gilad of the Academy of Competitive Intelligence. He suggested companies test strategic moves through role playing, with participants taking the parts of high-impact players.

Gilad had some advice for us information professionals as well – unless you can turn your insightful intelligence-gathering reports into action, they are useless. That’s why we need to become the trusted “sense maker” to our company’s top decision makers.

Innovation by insurance companies – customer experience

This year, SIR conducted a consumer survey on innovation by insurance companies. It found that auto and homeowners insurers were considered “pretty innovative” by 40 percent of respondents when compared with banks which were considered “pretty innovative” by 46 percent. This is a “pretty interesting” finding! When was the last time you heard about a new and exciting bank product?

Interestingly, there was a whopping 365 percent increase in the percentage of people reporting an increase in communication from P/C insurers regarding simplicity and ease of use of their products. It looks like people don’t equate improvements in ease of use and simplicity with innovation.

When asked which three things insurance customers would change through new technology or innovation, the top three were: privacy, ease and personalization in that order.

Artificial Intelligence (AI)

Reliance on AI is expected to increase in the next 20 years. How will AI change the world of insurance? According to Peter Grimm, CEO of Cipher Systems, it will involve:

  • The explosion of data from connected devices leading to new product categories, more personalized pricing and increasingly real-time service delivery.
  • Increased prevalence of physical robots (drones, self-driving cars, autonomous farming equipment) will lead to shifting risk pools, changing customer expectations and new products and channels.
  • Standardized data frameworks and formats will lead to highly connected data ecosystems between multiple private and public entities across many industries.
  • Advances in cognitive technologies (machines that mimic human learning) will enable products that re-evaluate risk in real time based on consumer behavior.

Chatbots and roboadvisors are already making roadways into the insurance industry and according to a survey by AXA; 34 percent of millennials want to interact with their insurer online only which shows that the market is prime for robo-advisor interaction.

Reading List

Here are a couple of books recommended by speakers that I can’t wait to dive into.

Geeta Wilson, vice president, consumer experience at Humana, recommends Competing Against Luck: The Story of Innovation and Customer Choice by Clayton M. Christensen. The author, a Harvard Business School professor who coined the term “disruptive innovation”, introduces the concept of “jobs to be done” theory in this book.

According to the theory, instead of asking customers what they want, companies would do better to get a deep understanding of what their customers do at the point when they require their product. Then the company needs to invent ways to help them do it easier, better and faster. Companies need to become obsessed with solving their customers’ problems or as Geeta put it, they need to “fall in love with the problem.”

Another book I look forward to reading is Professor Al Naqui’s The Beaver Bot of Yellowstone: Pure-Play Leadership for the Artificial Intelligence Revolution.  This book, targeted towards business leaders, promises to be an accessible guide through the mysterious and complicated cognitive transformation that firms are in for if they want to stay alive in the dawning age of AI.

 

Insurers Invest In Artificial Intelligence

About two-thirds of insurers use artificial intelligence-based (AI) “virtual assistants” to handle some customer calls and use of the technology is expected to increase, according to a just-published Accenture survey.

Today’s I.I.I. Daily, via Bloomberg, reports that 85 percent of the executives surveyed by Accenture indicated that they would invest “significantly” in the technology over the next three years.

Insurance companies will spend on average $90 million on artificial-intelligence technologies by 2020, according to research from Tata Consultancy Services.

The Bloomberg article “Insurance Customers Need to Get Used To Talking To Machines” is timely.

A new global study by software company Pegasystems Inc reveals that while consumers are optimistic about the benefits of AI, they are also confused about what AI really does and have misplaced fears that inhibit them from fully embracing AI devices and services.

In the survey of 6,000 customers in six countries, Pegasystems found that only one in three (36 percent) of consumers are comfortable with businesses using AI to engage with them—even if this typically results in a better customer experience.

Digital Insurance reports: “The irony in many cases is that consumers may be surprised to learn they are already exposed to much more AI than they realize.”

Only 34 percent of respondents thought they had directly experienced AI. But when asked about the technologies in their lives, the survey found that 84 percent actually use at least one AI-powered service or device such as virtual home assistants, intelligent chatbots, or predictive product suggestions.

“When asked separately to identify AI-powered devices, only 41 percent knew Amazon’s Alexa and Google Home run on AI.”