Category Archives: Earthquakes

Drop, Cover, and Hold On – Great Shakeout Earthquake Drills Take Place on October 15

About half of all Americans are at risk of ground shaking from earthquakes. That’s why practicing what to do in the event of a quake is so important and why over 11 million people worldwide (and counting) are participating in this year’s Great ShakeOut earthquake safety drill on October 15.

The Great ShakeOut Earthquake Drills is a worldwide earthquake safety movement. Most participate by registering to practice “Drop, Cover, and Hold On.”

ShakeOut organizers recommend people follow the Seven Steps to Earthquake Safety, which starts with Step 1: Secure Your Space. Most earthquake injuries are entirely preventable and are caused by furniture and other objects that move or break when shaking occurs, resulting in trips, bruises, cuts, and more. You can secure your space by moving heavy objects down to lower shelves, relocate tall furniture away from entrances and exits, and secure cabinets with latches.

In California, a state where earthquakes are frequent, Earthquake Warning California is coordinating a statewide drill to coincide with ShakeOut. People who have downloaded the MyShake app to their phone will receive a TEST warning at 10:15am with guidance to Drop, Cover, and Hold On!

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, some participants are adapting their ShakeOut activities through video-conferencing, choosing staggered or alternative dates, and following local health and safety guidelines.

To register for ShakeOut click here.

Additional Resources:

The Earthquake Country Alliance’s Safer At Home Webinar Series offer many safety tips and advice on how to minimize financial hardship.

Triple-I’s Facts & Statistics: Earthquake Insurance

Video: What’s covered by earthquake insurance

Earthquake Country Alliance’s Minimize Financial Hardship Webinar

The Earthquake Country Alliance will host a webinar on how to be financially prepared for an earthquake as part of its Seven Steps to Earthquake Safety series.

The webinar will focus on Step 4 – Minimize Financial Hardship. It will include tips on organizing important documents, strengthening your property and insurance. Experts listed below will discuss each of these elements, along with “live” demonstrations.

Date:   Wednesday, September 23, 2020 Time: 11am – 12pm PDT 

Presenters:

  • Janet Ruiz (Director – Strategic Communications, Insurance Information Institute)
  • Dante Randazzo (Federal Preparedness Coordinator, FEMA Region 9)
  • Janiele Maffei (Chief Mitigation Officer, California Earthquake Authority)
  • Glenn Pomeroy (Chief Executive Officer, California Earthquake Authority)
  • Randy Braverman (Project Manager Earthquake Brace + Bolt Program, Safe-T-Proof)
  • Tim Kaucher (Engineering Manager Southwestern U.S., Simpson Strong-Tie)

Register to attend

You can view recordings, presentations, and other resources for previous webinars:

Step 1 – Secure Your Space

Step 2 – Plan to Be Safe

Step 3 – Organize Disaster Supplies

Earthquake Shakes San Diego Day After National Earthquake Conference

Last week (March 4-6) the National Earthquake Conference —  attended by hundreds of  experts, including academics, engineers, government leaders, insurance professionals, and scientists – took place in San Diego.

The day after the conference, as if to make a point, a 5.5. magnitude earthquake that struck Baja California, Mexico, shook San Diego.

While no damage was reported, a study released at the conference by the San Diego chapter of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute showed that a magnitude 6.9 earthquake on San Diego’s Rose Canyon Fault could damage 100,000 residences, cause widespread road and bridge failures, and make parts of Mission Bay sink about a foot. Such a quake would inflict an estimated $38 billion in building and infrastructure damage, displacing 36,000 households and wreaking havoc on San Diego’s $245 billion economy.

Don’t be scared, be prepared

Conference goals were to improve life safety when earthquakes occur, to help communities learn how to recover faster, and to help prevent or minimize physical earthquake damage through stronger building practices, including research-informed, model building codes and standards.

Janet Ruiz, Triple-I’s Director of Strategic Communications, who was one of the attendees, said one of the great points of the conference was: “Don’t be scared, be prepared.”

Earthquake risk is insurable

One of the ways to be prepared for any disaster is to make sure you have adequate insurance. But as few as 13 percent of California homeowners have earthquake insurance.

Glenn Pomeroy of the California Earthquake Authority said earthquake risk is insurable. The average annual cost of earthquake insurance for a typical home in San Diego is between $100 and $444. Renters can secure financial protection from CEA for as little as $35 per month.

California Earthquakes: How Modern Building Codes Are Making Safer, More Resilient Communities

By Sean M. Kevelighan, CEO, The Insurance Information Institute

 

 

The earthquakes that hit southern California on July 4 and 5 gave us all reason to reflect on a natural disaster that infrequently makes headlines here in the U.S.  A major seismic event occurring near several population centers is the sort of thing that many fear—but it’s also something insurers study constantly to make sure quake-impacted affected areas can recover and rebuild.

Earthquakes and other natural disasters are facts of life. The International Code Council (ICC) helps to create resilience through modern building codes that enable households and communities to rebound faster and more completely after an earthquake.

The ICC reports:

 “On the morning of July 4, a 6.4 magnitude earthquake rattled through Southern California, with another 7.1 magnitude quake striking the region the following evening.

“The damage resulting from these events could have been significant. Thanks to the modern, up-to-date building codes in California – based on the International Codes (I-Codes) – the Searles Valley Earthquake resulted in no loss of life and minimal structural damage. The I-Codes are keeping us safe, and this event reminds us of the importance of adopting and effectively implementing current model building codes as a key defense against natural disasters. Building codes save lives.

“According to structural engineers working with the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute, the homes and buildings experiencing the most severe damage date back to the 1930s, ’40s and ’50s. Modern buildings built using model codes experienced damage that was largely limited to nonstructural elements or contents.”

We encourage you to read the entire article to learn more about the essential role of building codes in creating a “resilience culture” to make our communities safer and more productive.

Got Earthquake Insurance? Businesses Should AssesS Their Readiness for “The Big One” and Other Natural Disasters

By Loretta L. Worters, Vice President – Media Relations, Insurance Information Institute

Every year businesses temporarily shut down – or close forever – because of a disaster.  The 6.4- and 7.1-magnitude earthquakes which struck near Ridgecrest, California late last week are stark reminders of a quake’s ability to disrupt a business’ operations. Even though many California businesses are in seismically active areas, only one out of 10 commercial buildings are insured for quakes, according to the California Department of Insurance.

Depending upon a business’ location, the threat to its operations may come from risks other than earthquakes, such as a hurricane, tornado, or wildfire. Forty-plus percent of U.S. small businesses do not reopen after a disaster impacts them, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) estimates. But by taking measures to prepare, businesses can increase their chance of recovering financially from a disaster.

Steps businesses can take in the aftermath of this month’s southern California earthquakes:

1) Review Insurance Coverage: It is important businesses have the right amount and types of insurance for their needs and risk profile. There are two types of policies that can be purchased by a business owner.

  • A Businessowners Policy (BOP) is commonly purchased by small businesses. BOP policies combine property, liability, and business interruption coverages in one policy and are usually less comprehensive than a commercial multiple peril (CMP) policy. Business interruption coverage, also known as business income insurance, reimburses a business owner for lost profits and continuing fixed expenses during the time a business stays closed because of a covered event, such as a hurricane, tornado, or wildfire.
  • A Commercial Multiple Peril (CMP) policy combines several coverages—such as property, boiler and machinery, and general liability—into a single policy. It is typically less expensive to buy a CMP policy than to buy these coverages individually. Boiler and machinery insurance, also known as Equipment Breakdown Insurance, also usually extends to air conditioners, heating, electrical, telephone, and computer systems.
  • Commercial Earthquake Insurance Is Sold Separately: Earthquake-caused property damage and business interruption is not covered under either a standard BOP or CMP policy. Businesses in earthquake-prone parts of the U.S. must consider a separate policy or an endorsement to an existing policy which specifically mentions earthquake-caused damage. Earthquake insurance carries a percentage deductible ranging from 10 percent to 15 percent.

There are some areas of a business that automatically include coverage for earthquakes.  Commercial auto provides coverage for loss or damage from temblors.  This can include damage from falling debris, fire, or other events.  Injury to employees at work because of an earthquake is also a covered loss under workers’ compensation insurance.

2) Develop a Business Recovery Plan: Businesses that are forced to close following a disaster run the risk of never being able to open their doors again. But by developing a business disaster recovery plan, they will be able to determine how their operations will be restored after a natural or operational disaster. Moreover, the Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety (IBHS) offers a free, customizable toolkit to help businesses plan for any type of business interruption.

3) Take a Business Inventory: Creating a business inventory includes listing equipment, supplies, merchandise, and commercial vehicles. An inventory facilitates the filing of a business insurance claim.

Herein lies the fault:  Businessowners, by their very nature, are risk takers; trailblazers in their respective fields.  Risk-taking is a crucial component of launching and building a successful business, be it with capital investment, hiring employees or marketing strategies. But entrepreneurs who don’t purchase the right type and amount of coverage, including earthquake insurance, end up jeopardizing the enterprise they worked so hard to build, leaving themselves, and their business, on shaky ground.

Earthquakes: More links from Insurance Information Instititute

We posted this look at insurance coverage and earthquakes earlier today. More important links about earthquakes and insurance:

 

An analysis of workers comp exposure to California earthquakes

The earthquake risk exposure for California’s workers comp market is huge, as nearly every worker in the state is covered. By contrast only about 10 percent of Californians have residential earthquake insurance.

The Workers’ Compensation Insurance Rating Bureau of California (WCIRB) has recently partnered with Risk Management Solutions, Inc. (RMS), on a report quantifying the earthquake risk faced by California workers’ compensation insurers.

The timing of an earthquake event emerged as one of the critical factors when assessing the risk to employees. Recent earthquakes such as the Loma Prieta and the Northridge happened during off-peak hours; had the timing been different, the human impact could have been much worse. As expected the highest concentration of employees coincides with the highest hazard regions.

The Week in a Minute, 9/20/17

The I.I.I.’s California representative, Janet Ruiz briefed our membership this week on key insurance related stories. Here are some highlights. 

  • The I.I.I.’s Steven Weisbart was quoted in a Washington Post story on the insurance industry’s financial strength in the wake of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma.
  • A FEMA/State Disaster Recovery Center opened today (September 20) at the Carolyn Sims Center in Boynton Beach (Palm Beach County) for Floridians impacted by Hurricane Irma.
  • Florida’s Department of Financial Services opened Irma-related Insurance Village locales this week in St. Augustine, Jacksonville, Fort Myers, and Naples.
  • The Texas Department of Insurance (TDI) released details on Hurricane Harvey’s Disaster Assistance Mobile Unit Locations.
  • Maria made landfall as a Category 4 storm in southeast Puerto Rico Wednesday. The governor’s spokesperson said ‘this is a total disaster.’  The same evacuation centers used for Irma are filled with thousands of people according to CNN.
  • The LA Times offered these earthquake preparedness tips in the wake of the deadly 7.1 quake that struck Mexico City on Tuesday.
  • Politico posted last week an in-depth story on how Oklahoma’s earthquakes could adversely impact the U.S.’s energy supplies.  It was written by the author of Quakeland: On the Road to America’s Next Devastating Earthquake (Dutton 2017).
  • Dr. David Harkey will succeed Dr. Adrian Lund in January 2018 as president of the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) and the Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI).

 

Disaster theme parks coming to a city near you?

In Japan, disaster learning centers that allow visitors to experience simulated earthquakes, typhoons and fires are gaining five-star reviews on travel sites like TripAdvisor and providing valuable lessons in preparedness.

The Japan Times reports that earthquake simulators have become major tourist draws at more than 60 disaster education centers nationwide and are attracting growing numbers of foreign visitors.

Some attribute the increased interest in disaster prevention education in Japan to the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami. Others note that tourists today are more interested in life experiences than shopping.

From The Seattle Times: “Many of the more than 60 centers feature large shake tables where visitors can ride out fake quakes as powerful as the real thing. In some centers, visitors navigate life-size dioramas of crushed cars and teetering power poles while being quizzed on the best response to dangerous situations.”

The emphasis is on personal responsibility and action: how to make your way safely through wreckage and how to find the closest shelter.

So could centers like these form a valuable part of disaster preparation in earthquake-prone parts of the United States?

According to The Seattle Times, civic leaders in Seattle have long wanted to import the concept to quake-prone Western Washington, where many residents have only a vague understanding of the risks.

It quotes Bill Stafford, a retired director of the Trade Development Alliance of Greater Seattle: “If people could experience the visceral jolt of being rattled on a shake table or of picking their way through a recreation of a post-quake Seattle, they might take the risks more seriously.”

Check out I.I.I. facts and statistics on earthquakes.