Insurance March employment figures at odds with other industries

On May 8 the Labor Department reported that the U.S. labor market lost a historic 20.5 million nonfarm jobs in April, sending the unemployment rate to 14.7 percent. The worst affected sectors are leisure and hospitality, which lost 7.7 million workers.

Dr. Steven Weisbart, Triple-I’s chief economist, points out that the employment data for March 2020* for the insurance industry are startling largely because they are at odds with employment changes in many other lines of work.

  • Employment at property/casualty carriers held steady in March 2020 at 559,100–the same as in January and only 800 fewer than February.
  • Employment at life/annuity carriers held essentially steady in March 2020 at 347,600–the same as in October 2019 and down a bit from the 348,000-349,000 in November 2019 through February 2020.
  • Employment at health and medical insurance carriers rose in March 2020 to 585,100–its highest-ever level, up 1,500 from February 2020.
  • Employment at agencies and brokerages rose in March 2020 to 852,400–its highest ever level, up 1,700 from February.

* The insurance industry/sector-specific data are not seasonally adjusted and are one month behind the national data.

Workers Comp, Liability Next Up for Virus-Related Insurance Disputes

Coronavirus-related insurance litigation is likely to move beyond business interruption coverage and into workers comp and general liability policy lines as states begin to lift restrictions on economic activity.

“There’s just going to be a bloodbath of litigation over the next 10 years,” former Mississippi Attorney General and counsel at  Weisbrod Matteis & Copley Jim Hood told Bloomberg Law this week. “Even if the governor tells you to open up, that’s not going to protect you from a lawsuit.”

The Trump administration and Republican lawmakers are insisting that an employer liability shield be included in the next round of pandemic relief legislation, but it’s unclear whether Democrats will go along with the idea.

Ask the Experts: The Impact of COVID-19 on Workers Compensation (Property/Casualty 360, May 7, 2020)

Bill to Boost Aid to Dependents of Workers Killed by COVID-19 (Business Insurance, May 6, 2020)

Workplace Testing Guide May Provide Target for Lawsuits (Business Insurance, May 5, 2020)

A Better Workers’ Comp System:  Silver Lining of COVID-19? (Property/Casualty 360, May 1, 2020)

California Facilitates Workers Comp for Virus Claims

California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an executive order Wednesday that will make it easier for essential workers who contract COVID-19 to obtain workers’ compensations benefits. The governor said the order streamlines workers’ comp claims and establishes a rebuttable presumption that any essential workers infected with COVID-19 contracted the virus on the job. In effect, the change shifts the burden of proof that typically falls on workers and instead requires companies or insurers to prove that the employees didn’t get sick at work.

The California Federation of Labor, which asked for the change in a March 27 letter to the governor and legislative leaders, applauded the order. Dozens of business groups, led by the California Chamber of Commerce, pushed back last month on the labor federation’s request, saying the changes would force businesses to be the “safety net to mitigate the unprecedented outcomes of this natural disaster and the government’s response.”

Executive Order Threatens Stability of California Workers Compensation System (American Property Casualty Insurance Association press release, May 6, 2020)

California to Give Workers Comp to All Essential Employees Infected With Coronavirus (The Hill, May 6, 2020)

NCCI: Workers Comp Costs and COVID-19

If only 10 percent of health care workers contract COVID-19 and all of their claims are deemed compensable, workers’ compensation loss costs for that sector could double or even triple in some states, according to an analysis by the National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI).

Claims Journal reports that, in NCCI’s worst-case scenario, 50 percent of workers are infected and 60 percent of their claims are deemed compensable. That would result in $81.5 billion in increased costs —or two and half times current workers’ compensation loss costs — for the 38 states and District of Columbia, where NCCI tracks claims data. If eligibility is limited to first responders and healthcare workers and only 5 percent of those workers are infected, Claims Journal says, the increase in costs would be just $2 billion, assuming 60 percent of claims are paid.

From the Triple-I Blog:

ECONOMY STARTS REOPENING AMID NEW PANDEMIC PROJECTIONS

 

 

Business Interruption Coverage: Policy Language Rules

Whether business interruption coverage in property policies applies to COVID-19-related losses has become one of the dominant insurance debates during this pandemic. Lawsuits have been filed – some even before insurers have denied a claim – seeking to establish that policyholders are entitled to coverage for losses sustained during the current shutdowns. 

The debate often focuses on a simple phrase in the insurance policy: “direct physical loss or damage.” Business interruption coverage can apply to losses stemming from direct physical loss or damage. Losses that didn’t come from direct physical damages aren’t covered.

Michael Menapace, Esq.
Wiggin and Dana LLP

 “A property policy may, for example, pay to repair the damage caused by a fire and may cover the loss of business during the reconstruction period,” writes Michael Menapace, a professor of insurance law at Quinnipiac University School of Law and a Triple-I Non-Resident Scholar. “But here’s the rub.  Are the business interruptions related to COVID-19 caused by physical damage to property?”

Insurers say no, arguing that “damage to property” requires structural alteration like one would find in a typical claim, where, say, a fire destroyed the interior of a building or wind damaged windows and furniture.

The virus, on the other hand, leaves no visible imprint. Left alone, it can’t survive long and, after it has perished, whatever it was attached to is as good as before. Even if some remediation is needed – like cleaning metal surfaces – insurers might argue that this is no different from cleaning dirt off a surface. They cite cases in which judges have ruled there’s no physical damage from mold if the mold can be cleaned off.

Departing from common sense

Others depart from this common-sense, legally recognized definition. Some plaintiffs’ attorneys argue that if coronavirus is not direct physical damage then insurers would not have created an exclusion for viruses in the first place. Many insurers added exclusions for losses from viruses and communicable diseases after the SARS outbreak in 2003. 

Policy language, Menapace says, controls whether COVID-19 interruptions are covered. Some policies have standard terms and exclusions, some provide “all-risk” coverage – covering loss arising from any fortuitous cause except those specifically excluded – and others are variations on these types.

“The threshold issue will be whether the insureds can prove their business losses are caused by ‘physical damage to property’,” he writes. 

In past cases, where there is direct physical loss to property – such as contaminated food that couldn’t be sold or a building rendered useless by asbestos contamination – courts have found business interruption coverage was triggered. But when an earthquake caused a power loss in two factories, courts found the only injury was a shutdown of manufacturing operations that didn’t constitute “direct physical loss or damage.” 

What About Current Claims?

Are business interruptions related to COVID-19 the result of the government restrictions, or are they due to the physical loss to their property?  Menapace writes that many of the current claims would seem not to trigger the standard coverage in a commercial business interruption policy, but he cautions that this might not always be the case.

A true “all-risk policy,” he writes, “generally would not distinguish between business interruption losses due to government action or direct physical loss because all-risk policies cover all losses except those specifically excluded.”

But most commercial property policies aren’t true “all-risk policies”; instead, they typically cover business interruption losses “caused by direct physical damage to property” at or near the insured premises. 

“That will be difficult burden for policyholders to meet,” Menapace says.

Some policies exclude coverage for losses resulting from mold, fungi, or bacteria.  Because COVID-19 is a virus, that exclusion might not apply. Other policies exclude viruses, diseases, or pandemics. 

“If a policyholder believes it may have a claim,” Menapace advises, “it should provide prompt notice to its insurer(s) so it does not risk a denial based on late notice. Likewise, once the claim has been made, it is essential that the insured cooperate with the insurer, including providing timely proof of loss.”

Resources:

Business Income (Interruption): Key Facts

The True Cost of Rewriting Business Income (Interruption) Policies

Triple-I Briefing: Surplus Is Key to Insurers Keeping Policyholder PromisesISO Excluded Coronavirus Coverage 15 Years Ago

Insurers Respond to COVID-19 (5/08/2020)

Auto insurance refunds

U.S. auto insurers will return over $10 billion to their customers nationwide, according to an Insurance Information Institute estimate, in response to reduced driving during the pandemic.

We’ve listed many of the companies that are offering refunds here and here. These lists are not exhaustive, so be sure to check with your insurer to see if they are offering refunds or credits. All premium and rate adjustments are subject to regulatory approval.

On May 5, Allstate Corp. CEO Tom Wilson said the insurer would probably grant another rebate to auto insurance customers.  The second round of rebates would vary according to region. On April 6, the insurer announced that it would return more than $600 million in premiums to its policyholders because the nation’s drivers were traveling 40 percent to 55 percent fewer miles following stay-at-home orders. Wilson noted that American drivers are now traveling more miles than in mid-April, but the total is still 30 percent to 40 percent lower than before the pandemic. Wilson said the next refund would be more precise and that Allstate is now distributing the initial payback, which represents 15 percent of monthly premiums in April and May.

Horace Mann, a provider of affordable insurance for educators, is giving customers a credit of 15 percent of two months of auto premiums, as well as a grace period through June on auto, property, supplemental and life insurance payments; enhancing coverages, including extending personal auto coverage to those delivering food, medicine, and other essential goods; and including Identity Fraud Advocacy Services with its Educator Advantage Program for all home, condo, and renters customers to protect against the increased risk due to increased online activity.

Other customer support programs

Erie Insurance is adding gift card and gift certificate reimbursement coverage to the company’s ErieSecure Home® policies, in response to the recent changes affecting businesses across the United States. The additional feature, included at no additional cost, would reimburse customers for remaining balances on eligible gift cards that no longer can be used at independently owned and operated local businesses due to business closures.

Supporting communities

Foremost Insurance and Bristol West Insurance, members of the Farmers Insurance Group of Companies, announced they have contributed $500,000 to the Trusted Choice COVID-19 Relief Fund established by the Independent Insurance Agents & Brokers of America, Inc. (IIABA – Big “I”). The Fund provides economic aid to independent insurance agencies, brokerages, and their owners and employees affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Horace Mann donated $100,000 to DonorsChoose “Keep Kids Learning” fund, an initiative to help teachers equip the most vulnerable students with educational materials at home. The company provides free online teaching resources, to help teachers adapt to remote learning, and it supports a number of foundations in its home state of Illinois.

Reach out to us in the Comments section and let us know what your company is doing to help ease the impact of COVID-19.

Triple-I Paper Looks at Convective Storms, Mitigation, and Resilience

Severe convective storms—tornadoes, hail, drenching thunderstorms with lightning, and damaging straight-line winds—are among the biggest threats to life and property in the United States. They were the costliest natural catastrophes for insurers in 2019, and this year’s tornado season is already shaping up to be the worst in nearly a decade.

A new Triple-I paper describes how population growth, economic development, and possible changes in the geography, frequency, and intensity of these storms contribute to significant insurance payouts. It also examines how insurers, risk managers, individuals, and communities are responding to mitigate the risks and improve resilience through:

  • Improved forecasting,
  • Better building standards,
  • Early damage detection and remediation, and
  • Increased risk sharing through wind and hail deductibles and parametric insurance offerings.

The 2020 tornado season coincided with most of the U.S. economy shutting down over the coronavirus pandemic. This could affect emergency response and resilience now and going into the 2020 hurricane season, which already is being forecast as “above normal” in terms of the number of anticipated named storms.

Economy Starts Reopening Amid New Pandemic Projections

Business interruption insurance and liability issues remain on the front burners as governments begin gradually “reopening the economy” amid scary new projections about the pandemic.

Trump Says Task Force Will Wind Down (The New York Times, May 5, 2020)

Pennsylvania’s Coronavirus Death Toll More Than Tripled in New Projection (Lehigh Valley Live, May 5, 2020)

Models Project Sharp Rise in Deaths as States Reopen (The New York Times, May 4, 2020)

D.C. Business Interruption Insurance Move on Hold

A measure that would make it easier for small businesses in Washington, D.C. to claim coronavirus-related damages under business interruption insurance policies is on hold after six of the 12 D.C. Council members raised concerns about its legality and the costs it could impose on insurers.

Council Chairman Phil Mendelson struck the language from a broader pandemic emergency bill to allow for more debate. Councilman Charles Allen had spearheaded the measure after many small businesses have seen their insurers deny such claims.

The American Property Casualty Insurance Association estimates local businesses could claim losses of hundreds of millions of dollars each month.

“These numbers dwarf the premiums for all relevant commercial property risks in the key insurance lines for D.C., which are estimated at $16 million a month,” David Sampson, the association’s president and CEO, wrote in a statement. “We oppose constitutionally flawed legislation that retroactively rewrites insurance contracts and threatens the stability of the sector, to the detriment of all policyholders.”

Lloyd’s Syndicate Slams ‘Direct Physical Loss’ Claim in COVID Suit (Business Insurance, May 6, 2020)

Coalition Proposes Recovery Fund to Help Businesses During COVID-19 (Property/Casualty 360, May 5, 2020)

A.M. Best: BI Insurers Face ‘Existential Threat’ if Forced to Cover COVID-19 (Best’s Insurance News & Analysis, May 5, 2020)

Utah Governor Signs Bill Shielding Businesses, Property Owners from Coronavirus-Related Suits (The Salt Lake Tribune, May 4, 2020)

Managing Risk as Businesses Reopen After COVID-19 (Property/Casualty 360, May 4, 2020)

U.K. Companies to Shun Business Interruption Insurance (Financial Times, May 3, 2020)

Care Homes Seek Shield From Lawsuits

Faced with 20,000 coronavirus deaths and counting, the nation’s nursing homes are pushing back against a potential flood of lawsuits with a sweeping lobbying effort to get states to grant them emergency protection from claims of inadequate care.

The Associated Press reports that at least 15 states have enacted laws or governors’ orders that explicitly or apparently provide nursing homes and long-term care facilities some protection from lawsuits arising from the crisis. And in the case of New York, which leads the nation in deaths in such facilities, a lobbying group wrote the first draft of a measure that apparently makes it the only state with specific protection from both civil lawsuits and criminal prosecution.

Feds Consider Relaxing Infection Control in U.S. Nursing Homes (USA Today, May 5, 2020)

1,700 More Nursing Home Deaths From COVID-19 Now Reported in New York (CNY Central, May 5, 2020)

The Grim Post-COVID-19 Future for Nursing Homes (Forbes, May 4, 2020)

Data Shows Reach of COVID-19 in Illinois Nursing Homes: At Least 286 Deaths (Chicago Tribune, April 19, 2020)

How are consumers perceiving auto insurance during the COVID-19 crisis?

Since people are driving less in the midst of COVID-19 related stay-at-home orders, many auto insurers have responded with premium refunds totaling about $10 billion.

How are consumers reacting to these refunds? A May 5 webinar co-hosted by Cambridge Mobile Telematics’ (CMT) VP of Insurance & Government Affairs, Ryan McMahon, and J.D. Power’s VP of Insurance Intelligence, Kyle Schmitt, shed light on this question.

J.D. Power has been conducting consumer sentiment surveys since March 24. Schmitt said that one key takeaway is that in light of pandemic related layoffs, customers are thinking pragmatically about auto insurance, so the timing of the premium relief announcements was excellent. However, it’s important to note that auto insurance is not top of mind for many consumers struggling to keep the lights on or food on the table, and not everyone is aware of refunds.

Here are a few other key takeaways:

  • McMahon noted that while miles travelled are down, speeding and distraction both peaked in April based on CMT’s analysis, and fatalities are up.
  • Schmitt said that changes in price stability driven by broad market conditions (such as accident frequency) are not well received by consumers who will shop around in response; in contrast to price increases driven by a life event or an accident which consumers tend to take in stride.
  • When it comes to telematics, value is key. Consumers expect to continue to not drive as much in the foreseeable future and are thinking about the cost savings offered by telematics programs, therefore interest in telematics has spiked according J.D. Power surveys.
  • Of those that think their driving rates will remain low 40 percent are interested in telematics.

The panelists were also asked to speculate about possible increases in fraud, and McMahon said that fraud activity always comes with economic reductions, however it’s possible that fraudulent claims may be easier to spot because there are fewer claims.

A Toast to Marine Insurance!

By John Novaria, Managing Director, Amplify

When you think of winemaking, you picture grapes on the vine and a hearty glass of red on your table. But you probably don’t think of all the steps involved in the production of wine and the fact that those grapes – and later, the finished product – travel long distances to reach our palates.

That’s where marine insurance comes in: to protect businesses along the supply chain from the unexpected.

The American Institute of Marine Underwriters (AIMU) drew a robust crowd to its recent webinar, “From Vine to Wine and the Fire In Between,” where participants learned of the risks associated with wine production and the coverages that are designed to mitigate losses. The two-hour session is part of AIMU’s extensive and popular educational series, and drew a crowd of underwriters, claims experts and brokers from the ranks of marine insurers and beyond.

“One of the biggest roles we perform is education, and it’s not limited to our members,” says John Miklus, President of AIMU. “Marine touches so many aspects of business that there’s a real thirst for knowledge in the broader insurance community and we try to quench that thirst.”

Pamela Schultz, Jonathan Thames and Erik Kowalewsky of Hinshaw & Culbertson opened by discussing the effects of the 2017 wildfires on the Napa and Sonoma wine growers and wineries, where 10 percent of the harvest was still on the vine when the fires started.

There are nearly 20 steps involved in wine production, including include growing, harvesting, fermenting, storage, barreling, aging, blending, bottling, labeling and distributing. Each presents opportunities for things to go wrong.

Thames explained that Stock Throughput is a form of marine coverage that insures goods in all their physical states along the supply chain with the exception of damage caused by the processes of turning the raw materials into the finished products. He said policies are generally very broadly worded and cover all risks.

Schultz pointed out how marine insurance comes into play during shipment. Stock Throughput policies are designed to cover supply chains and anything that moves inventory against loss due to:

  • Extreme weather and natural disasters can cause supply chain interruptions and even loss of product.
  • Transportation: Obviously, wine has to get from the vineyard to the table and that table may be anywhere in the world.
  • Trade problems/disruption: This affects imports and exports, especially delays due to current COVID-19 crisis.
  • Lack of Control: Products are sometimes shipped long distances, and it’s difficult to know everything about every link of the supply or travel chain.
  • Invaders: Yes, pests have been known to get into wine and cause damage and so can fumigation.
  • CTL: Constructive Total Loss becomes an issue if the wine is stolen. Most policies exclude consumption of wine, but Schultz said that hasn’t stopped some insureds from trying to claim it on that basis.

The 2017 California wildfires brought into focus the issue of smoke taint. The smoke that lingers for weeks after the fires are extinguished can taint the grapes, rendering a wine unpalatable, or worse, undrinkable.

Thames noted that smoke taint claims don’t arise until after fermentation, after the wine has been tasted, and the grower must prove damage with scientific evidence and serve notice of potential loss within 60 days. However, he said there are cost effective processes winemakers can put in place beforehand to mitigate the effect.

The presenters discussed the difference between crop insurance and whole farm revenue protection, both of which offer only limited protection to the grower. Crop insurance is not a 100 percent indemnity product; it only covers the grapes pre-harvest, so there will always be a gap. Limits are based on past yields so it’s difficult to expand limits in the first few years.

As a result of the 2017 fires in Oregon, one winemaker now requires its growers to carry crop insurance and pays half the premium.

Whole farm revenue protection insures against lost revenue, but doesn’t protect particular crops as it is not a property policy. To make a claim on this policy the insured must establish that farm revenue is down as a result of the winery rejecting the grapes.

Participants were invited to vote on their favorite wine, and the overwhelming choice was Red, at 70 percent. White garnered 17 percent of the vote and Rose 12 percent.

Upcoming AIMU courses include Yacht Insurance Fundamentals, which offers 6 CE credits, and Introduction to Static Risk Insurance: Warehouse Basics, offering 3 credits.

National Hurricane Preparedness Week 2020

The start of what may be an “above-normal” 2020 Atlantic hurricane season is a month away and homeowners, renters, and business owners are advised to prepare now.

“As much as we are living today with the unimaginable impact of COVID-19, we must remind residents along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts to remember it takes only one hurricane or tropical storm to ravage communities and to shatter lives,” said Sean Kevelighan, CEO, Triple-I. “During National Hurricane Preparedness Week (May 3-9), we encourage residents to take a moment to ensure you have adequate financial protection for your property and possessions while also taking steps to make your home or business is more resilient to wind and water. Since we are all needing to stay home more, it’s even more important to make ourselves more resilient to natural catastrophes like hurricanes.”

The Atlantic hurricane season begins on June 1 and continues through Nov. 30.

Review Your Insurance Coverage
Make sure you have the right type – and amount – of property insurance. The Triple-I recommends you conduct an annual insurance review of your policy(ies) with your insurance professional.

Standard homeowners insurance covers the structure of your house for disasters such as hurricanes and windstorms, along with a host of other disasters. It is important to understand the elements that might affect your insurance payout after a hurricane and adjust your policies accordingly.

At the very least, review the declarations page of your policy. This one-page information sheet offers details on how much coverage you have, your deductibles and insights into how a claim will be paid.

“You should ask your insurance professional if you have the right amount of insurance coverage to rebuild or repair your home, to replace its contents, and to cover temporary living expenses if your property is uninhabitable,” Kevelighan said. “You should also ask about flood insurance, which is separate and additional to traditional homeowners and small business insurance. Ninety percent of natural disasters involve flooding.”

Flood insurance, which is a separate policy from your property coverage, is offered through FEMA’s National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and several private insurers.

Another common exclusion from a standard homeowners policy is sewer backup (also not covered by flood insurance). Backed up sewers can cause thousands of dollars of damage to floors, electrical systems, walls, furniture and other belongings. Sewer backup insurance is especially beneficial in hurricane-prone areas.

Protect Your Vehicles

Comprehensive auto, which is an optional coverage, protects your vehicle against theft and damage caused by an incident other than a collision, including fire, flood, vandalism, hail, falling rocks or trees, and other hazards.

Make Sure Your Possessions are Adequately Protected
Imagine the cost of repurchasing all your furniture, clothing and other personal possessions after a hurricane. Whether you have homeowners insurance or renters insurance, your policy provides protection against loss or damage due to a hurricane.
Creating an inventory of your belongings and their value will make it easy to see if you are sufficiently insured for either replacement cost or cash value of the items. When you create a photo or video catalog of your home’s possessions, it will also help expedite the insurance claims process if you sustain damage from a storm.

Make Your Property More Resilient
Invest in items that will harden your property against wind damage, such as a wind-rated garage door and storm shutters. Triple-I also recommends you have your roof inspected annually by a licensed and bonded contractor to make sure it will hold up to high winds and torrential rains.

Other hurricane season preparation tips from Triple-I include:

  • Preparing a hurricane emergency kit with a minimum two-week supply of essential items such as non-perishable food, drinking water and medications for every family member.
  • Creating an evacuation plan well before the first storm warnings are issued.

Related links

Facts and Statistics: Hurricanes
Hurricane Season Insurance Guide
How to Prepare for Hurricane Season
What to do When a Hurricane Threatens
Video: Create a Home Inventory

2020 worst tornado year in almost a decade


Tornadoes in 2020 claimed 73 lives as of April 24, according to this article citing NOAA’s Storm Prediction Center. The tornadoes have all occurred in eight southern states, with Tennessee and Mississippi having the most. This is the deadliest year for tornadoes in the U.S. since 2011.

Forecasters had predicted that above-average temperatures in the Gulf of Mexico would lead to severe storms across the Deep South and Southeast, with the risk expanding into the Southern Plains and increasing dramatically before swallowing traditional “Tornado Alley” across the central United States by May.

According to Aon Benfield, the United States has recorded five billion-dollar economic loss events resulting from severe convective storms (which include tornadoes) so far in 2020. Insured losses from a March 27-30 outbreak are estimated at $1 billion.

Tornado preparedness

Watch this video for tornado safety tips.

Insurance considerations

While COVID-19 is causing changes in some business practices, the nation’s insurers are open and helping customers who sustained tornado-related damage. Property damage caused by tornadoes is covered under standard homeowners, renters, and business insurance policies, and under the optional comprehensive portion of an auto insurance policy.

The Triple-I has these recommendations when property damage occurs for renters, home and auto owners:

  • Contact your insurance professional and start the claims filing process.
  • Take photos of any damage. A photographic record is useful when making an insurance claim.
  • Make temporary repairs to prevent further loss from rain, wind or looting; these costs are reimbursable under most policies, so save the receipts.
  • Compile a detailed list of all damaged or destroyed personal property.  Do not throw out damaged property until you meet with an insurance adjuster. If you have a home inventory, it will make the claims-filing process easier.
  • Hold off on signing repair contracts. Do your due diligence, deal with reputable contractors, and get references. Be sure of payment terms and consult your insurance adjuster before signing any contracts.
  • Check to see if you’re eligible for additional living expenses (ALE). Standard homeowners and renters insurance policies pay for the extra charges (e.g., temporary housing, restaurant meals) you incur over and above your customary living expenses if your home is uninhabitable because of an insured loss. Save all related receipts and, if you have vacated your home, make sure your insurer knows how to contact you. 

Small Business Owners should follow the same advice as above when it comes to filing a property damage claim.

If your business is forced to close temporarily or relocate because of direct physical damage to its premises, file either a business income (also known as business interruption) or extra expense claim, if you carry these coverages.

Tornado forecasting and reporting

An upcoming Triple-I paper – Severe convective storms: Evolving risks call for innovation to reduce costs, drive resilience, scheduled to be published May 7 – discusses how improved reporting and forecasting and an apparent shifts in “Tornado Alley” affect the ability of businesses, communities, and insurers to mitigate tornado risks and prepare for resilience.

Latest research and analysis