Tag Archives: Civil disorders

Insured Losses
Due to Civil Unrest
Seen Nearing 1992 Levels

Insured losses related to civil disorder in 2020 are on their way toward a level not seen since 1992, according to estimates by insurance industry analysts. 

On May 26, 2020, protests and riots broke out in response to the death of George Floyd while in Minneapolis police custody and spread to another 140 U.S. cities. By June 4, at least 40 cities in 23 states had imposed curfews, and rioting resulted in at least six deaths. National Guard were called in at least 21 states and Washington, D.C. 

Property Claim Services (PCS) a unit of a Verisk Analytics, has designated the Minneapolis riots a catastrophe. This was the first time PCS has compiled insured losses for a civil disorder event since the Baltimore riots of April 2015. Insured losses in the Baltimore unrest – following the funeral for Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old who died in police custody – fell short of $25 million when it occurred, PCS’s threshold for a catastrophe.  

The 2020 activity, spanning May 26 through June 8 and including more than 20 states with significant losses, is the first time since 1992 that PCS has declared a civil disorder event a catastrophe. The 1992 riots in Los Angeles, after a jury acquitted Los Angeles Police Department officers for using excessive force in the arrest and beating of Rodney King, caused $775 million in insured losses, according to PCS – or about $1.4 billion in 2020 dollars. 

Insured losses for the most recent event are not yet available from PCS. Preliminary estimates from industry analysts put the losses in the range of $500 million to $900 million.

Those estimates will likely change as insurers are resurveyed and data is refined. 

With protests and clashes with police continuing in Portland, Ore., and elsewhere, and President Trump threatening to send federal troops to quell the disorder in some cities, no end seems to be in sight for this costly string of civil disturbances.  

FAQ: Riots and Business Insurance

Riots across the U.S. and the subsequent damage to thousands of businesses have many business owners asking what their business insurance policies will cover. In this interview, Triple-I Vice President of Media Relations Loretta Worters answers some frequently asked questions about business insurance and what it covers.

Are businesses covered for property damage from riots?

Yes, they are. Business property that has been damaged by riot, civil commotion. vandalism and fire are covered under virtually all businessowners and commercial insurance property policies. This typically includes damage to windows, doors, light fixtures, store windows and plate glass on office fronts. There is also coverage for the contents of the building such as furniture, office supplies, computers or machinery that may be either damaged or stolen.

Should a business insure its building and contents at replacement value or actual cash value?

A business may have the option to insure its business property at replacement value or actual cash value. The difference is that replacement value coverage can help a business replace its property at market prices, whereas actual cash value coverage takes depreciation into account. Replacement value coverage costs more, but it also pays out more in the event of a claim.

What about loss of income?  

Businesses that are forced to suspend operations or limit hours due to rioting, vandalism or civil commotion and have coverage for the loss of income under business income insurance (also known as business interruption, or BI) do have coverage. Coverage is typically triggered if there is direct physical damage to the premises.

What if a business is unable to access its property due to a government order? If there is a curfew in place, how will that impact a business?

While insurance policies vary, typically there is business interruption coverage for civil authority orders, such as curfews (when a business has reduced hours) or when a business is unable to access its property due to a government order requiring the business to close. Such coverage nearly always requires the existence of property damage within some limited geographic radius surrounding the policyholder’s location. This often ranges from 1 to 10 miles. Typically civil authority coverage has a waiting period of 24 to 72 hours, depending on the policy, before a policyholder can begin claiming the benefits of coverage. Coverage typically lasts up to four weeks, but the time period can be extended by paying an additional premium. However, once a curfew is lifted and business can resume, coverage ceases. 

Is business income coverage subject to a deductible?

Under most policies, business income coverage is subject to either a waiting period, which acts like a form of deductible or a monetary deductible. 

How will the amount of the business income loss be determined for a business?

Under most policies, business income coverage includes both net income (the profit a business earns after expenses and allowable deductions) and the cost of continuing normal operations.

What information does a business need to support its business income claim?

Most insurers require the following:

  • Profit and Loss statements
  • Sales records
  • Income tax returns
  • Rent or mortgage statements
  • Payroll records

What if a business vehicle has been damaged in a riot?

Damage to vehicles is covered under the optional comprehensive portion of an auto policy. This provides reimbursement for damage to the vehicle and its contents caused by fire, falling objects, vandalism or riot. Comprehensive coverage also reimburses a business if the vehicle’s windshield is cracked or shattered. Some companies offer glass coverage without a deductible.

Any advice for business owners?

Know your risks! Every smart business owner recognizes that business insurance is an essential element of an overall business plan. It should be factored in with fixed operational expenses like utilities. Without adequate coverage, business owners may have to pay out-of-pocket for costly damages from a riot, hurricane or other disaster, which could spell financial ruin.

Charlotte Unrest and Business Insurance

Ongoing civil unrest and protests in Charlotte, North Carolina following the police shooting of Keith Scott are reported to have caused significant property damage to businesses in the central area of the city.

The Charlotte Observer reports that entertainment complex EpiCentre faced looting and sustained significant damage Wednesday night. Numerous businesses were damaged, including Sundries EpiCentre, CVS, Enso and Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse, it said.

The NASCAR Hall of Fame was among other sites hit by vandals, with adjacent restaurants and hotels also damaged after officials declared a state of emergency for the city.

As clean-up gets underway it’s important to note that most commercial insurance policies generally include coverage for losses caused by riots. civil commotions and fires.

The definition of rioting covers looting by people who steal merchandise or other property from a premises. Vandalism is also covered.

According to The Charlotte Observer, a possible curfew for Thursday night is being discussed by city officials.

The Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) notes that if a business has to suspend operations or limit hours due to rioting, business interruption coverage is only covered if there is direct physical damage to the premises, forcing a business to suspend operations.

A “civil authority provision” in a business policy provides coverage for lost income and extra expenses in the event the police or fire department bars access to a specific area as a result of the danger caused by a riot or civil commotion.

In April 2015, looting and arson in Baltimore, Maryland, following the funeral for Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old who died after suffering a severe spinal cord injury while in police custody, resulted in estimated property damage of about $24 million, according to the I.I.I..

Five of the costliest civil disorders in the U.S. occurred in the 1960s. Here’s they are:

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