Tag Archives: covid-19 business interruption

Triple-I CEO Tells U.S. House—Global Pandemics Are Uninsurable

On May 21, Triple-I CEO Sean Kevelighan testified before the U.S. House of Representatives’ Small Business Committee on the subject of business interruption coverage.

Since the outbreak of COVID-19, some legislators and advocates have pushed for policies that would retroactively force insurers to pay for claims their insurance policies were not priced to cover. The U.S. House session, “Business Interruption Coverage: Are Policyholders Being Left Behind?,” gave members of the committee the opportunity to hear from policyholders and other interested stakeholders.

“An event like a global pandemic is uninsurable,” said Kevelighan in his statement. “Unlike a typical covered catastrophe, which is limited in terms of geography and time, pandemics have the potential to impact everywhere, all at once…. As such, this type of magnitude requires government resources to step in and provide support.”

Property business insurance, in general, is meant to cover physical damage from perils like fire, tornado, or hurricane,” he said. Forcing insurers to cover losses related to the pandemic – which don’t involve physical damage to property – would cost the industry between $150 billion to $400 billion per month.

“Make no mistake; retroactive business interruption payouts would bankrupt insurers,” said Kevelighan.  “A recent Triple-I economic analysis determined this type of approach would decimate the industry’s financial resources in a matter of months, and at a time it needs those monies for major natural disasters that insurance policies cover, such as tornadoes, hurricanes, and wildfires.”

 “Any efforts to retroactively rewrite business interruption policies are not only unconstitutional (Article I) but would imperil the insurance industry’s ability to pay covered insurance claims filed by American homeowners, drivers, and injured workers,” Kevelighan said.

“The current government shut-down orders do not trigger the vast majority of standard business interruption policies because those orders do not qualify as direct physical loss to property—a requirement under the policies,” he said.

“The insurance industry is stepping up for Americans, with the likes of $10.5 billion in personal auto insurance premium relief, $220 million in charitable donations, and even more by keeping nearly two million Americans employed so insurance customers will be covered, and have their claims handled, when other disasters strike,” Kevelighan concluded.

View the full testimony and a recording of the webcast here.

The insurance industry is united in its position that pandemics are uninsurable, and the industry has some formidable support in that view. In a letter to the committee, the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) said: “The current COVID-19 crisis has highlighted that many existing business interruption (BI) policies have specific exclusions for viruses or other diseases, and coverage is generally only triggered by actual physical damage. Therefore, these policies were generally not designed or priced to provide coverage for claims arising from COVID-19.”

The NAIC letter said that the group opposes efforts to legislatively apply business interruption coverage retroactively to claims based on COVID-19 and “has serious concerns that requiring retroactive coverage of BI claims based on COVID-19 would pose significant risks to the solvency of insurance companies and could have systemic impacts on the industry as a whole and potentially the financial system.”

And in a letter to President Trump on May 18, six Republican Senators warned that altering insurance law to cover all pandemic claims under business interruption policies would devastate the capital reserved for paying other insurance claims.

COVID-19 Wrap-Up:
BI Coverage Continues
to Make Headlines

From new litigation to proposed legislation, debate over whether insurers should be required to pay for business losses related to the coronavirus pandemic remain in the news. 

Restaurants Sue Insurers Over Business Interruption Claims  

Proprietors of more than 10 restaurants, bars, and bakeries in Washington, D.C., joined a growing list of restaurateurs seeking coverage for pandemic-related damages, The Washington Post reports.   

The Post interviewed Triple-I CEO Sean Kevelighan and Triple-I non-resident scholar Michael Menapace, who explained why the suits are unreasonable and threaten the insurance industry’s solvency. 

“The insurance business works by spreading risk around so the industry isn’t hit all at once with claims,”  Kevelighan says. “A pandemic disrupts business far and wide, with no end date in sight.” 

About 40 percent of all companies have business interruption insurance, and most policies explicitly exclude coverage for viruses and infectious diseases.  If lawmakers retroactively require carriers to pay these unplanned-for claims, it could cost the insurance industry $150 billion a month, which would quickly deplete its $800 billion surplus. 

Policyholder Pulls COVID-19 Suit Against Broker, Insurer Business Insurance May 20, 2020 

Insurance Speak: Business Interruption Claims and COVID-19 Property/Casualty 360, May 20, 2020 

COVID-19 and Business Interruption Insurance – How to File a Claim the Right Way Franchising.com, May 19, 2020 

Coronavirus Pandemic Threatens Run on Business Interruption Policies Sold by Captive Insurance Risk Pools Forbes.com, May 19. 2020 

California Music Venues Sue Insurer over Business Interruption Related to COVID-19 Insurance Journal, May 15, 2020 

La. Lawmakers Scrap Business Interruption Bill

Louisiana lawmakers scrapped a bill that would have forced insurers to cover retroactive business interruption claims due to COVID-19, Business Insurance reports

However, state senators agreed to rewrite and amend Senate Bill 477 to allow a proposal requiring insurers to clarify exclusions on business interruption policies to move ahead. 

The scrapping of the Louisiana proposal follows last week’s decision by the Council of the District of Columbia not to go ahead with a proposal to force insurers to provide retroactive business interruption coverage on small-business COVID-19 claims. 

Coronavirus Updates in Louisiana: 35,038 COVID-19 Cases, 2,458 Deaths, WDSU 6, New Orleans, May 19, 2020 

Dozens of Workers at 3 Louisiana Crawfish Farms Test Positive for COVID-19, 4 WWL, New Orleans, May 19, 2020 

Red Flags Found at Louisiana Nursing Homes Ravaged by Coronavirus, NOLA.com, May 19, 2020 

Pa. Bill Would Define COVID-19 as Property Damage 

The Pennsylvania Senate is weighing a bill that would include losses spurred by the COVID-19 global pandemic under property and business interruption insurance coverage, Property/Casualty 360 reports. 

Senate Bill 1127 doesn’t explicitly state that insurers must cover COVID-19 business interruption claims. The bill states that if a covered property is located within a municipality where “the presence of the COVID-19 coronavirus has otherwise been detected,” that property is “deemed to have experienced property damage.” 

It also states that Gov. Tom Wolf’s March 19 emergency order to close businesses is to be considered an order of civil authority under a first-party insurance policy which limits, prohibits, or restricts access to non-life-sustaining business locations “as a direct result of physical damage at or in the immediate vicinity of those locations.”  

Coronavirus: 63,666 cases of COVID-19 in Pennsylvania, WGAL News 8, May 20, 2020 

Nursing Homes in Southeast Pa. Hit Hard By Coronavirus Deaths, New Data Shows, NBC 10 Philadelphia, May 20, 2020 

Pa. Releases Names of Nursing Homes with Coronavirus Cases, DeathsPhiladelphia Inquirer, May 19, 2020 

Pa. Supreme Court Rejects Emergent Application to Consolidate COVID-19 Business Interruption Claims JDSupra.com, May 19, 2020 

Pa. Insurance Commissioner Warns Businesses of Increased Liability Risks If Defying Coronavirus Shutdow Orders KDKA 2, Pittsburgh, May 11, 2020 

Publisher Appeals COVID-19 Ruling Denying Coverage 

A magazine publisher is appealing a federal court ruling in favor of an insurer in a coronavirus-related business interruption dispute, Business Insurance reports

In one of the first court rulings on the business interruption coverage issue, U.S. District Court Judge Valerie E. Caproni, in the Southern District of New York, said the policyholder’s attorney deserved “a gold star for creativity” but the loss was not covered under the policy issued by the unit of Hartford Financial Services Group Inc. 

From the Triple-I Blog

REQUIRING INSURERS TO COVER PANDEMIC-RELATED SHUTDOWNS WOULD JEOPARDIZE INDUSTRY’S SOLVENCY, EXPERTS SAY

TRIPLE-I LAUNCHES CAMPAIGN TO SUPPORT RESILIENCY OF THE ECONOMY DURING THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC

WEBINAR: BUILDING RESILIENT BUSINESSES AND COMMUNITIES IN THE TIME OF COVID-19

U.S. TREASURY WEIGHS IN ON DEBATE SURROUNDING BUSINESS INTERRUPTION INSURANCE

WORKERS COMP, LIABILITY NEXT UP FOR VIRUS-RELATED INSURANCE DISPUTES

Requiring insurers to cover pandemic-related shutdowns would jeopardize industry’s solvency, experts say

Most insurance experts believe legislative proposals that would require insurers to cover business-interruption (BI) claims stemming from COVID-19 related shutdowns, even if the insurance policies exclude pandemic-related losses, threaten the solvency of the insurance industry. This is the finding of a survey conducted by the Wisconsin School of Business and the Center for Insurance Policy and Research of the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC).

The survey also found most experts believe the private market will have a difficult time efficiently supplying BI coverage for pandemics, given the systemic, correlated, and non-diversifiable nature of the peril.

Many survey respondents felt only the federal government can provide coverage for correlated risks because it can spread the cost through taxation, long-run borrowing, and deficit financing. But whether provided by only the federal government or the private market, the pricing and affordability of coverage were indicated to be issues for both.

Most said they believe the private market can supply BI coverage for pandemics with an effective federal partnership. Some questioned whether the Terrorism Risk Insurance Program (TRIP) is a good model for pandemic insurance, given the similarities between the pandemic and terrorism perils.

The complete survey can be found here.

Triple-I Launches Campaign To Support Resiliency Of The Economy During The Coronavirus Pandemic

On May 18 the Insurance Information Institute (Triple-I) announced the launch of the Future of American Insurance & Reinsurance (FAIR) campaign. FAIR will focus on ensuring the insurance industry is able to sustain its longstanding role as the country’s backbone of economic growth and stability.

FAIR is being set into motion as the country seeks a pathway to economic recovery in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. As communities reopen and restart, insurers will play a critical role in the process, continuing to provide financial protection for the millions of Americans who depend on them for indemnification from risks they rightfully insured. Yet the industry is threatened with growing calls to retroactively alter insurance policies, cover the economic cost of widespread closures, and adjust workers’ compensation criteria, among other new developments.

Sean Kevelighan

“FAIR was created to safeguard the ability of the insurance industry to support its customers at a time when policymakers, the business community, and the general public are searching for solutions to our ongoing economic turmoil. And while we recognize the need for financial relief is severe, any attempts to make insurers retroactively responsible for a global pandemic puts the solvency of many insurers at risk,” said Sean Kevelighan, CEO, Triple-I.

“While the insurance industry has been doing its part to step up and support their communities in this time of crisis, pandemics are fundamentally uninsurable events. The federal government remains the only entity with the financial resources to help businesses recover from a systemic event of this magnitude. With the support of the public sector and the innovation of groups like insurers in the private sector, we can come together to work toward recovering from this catastrophe and build a more resilient future,” he added.

Insurance carriers are an integral part of local communities across the country, employing over 2.7 million Americans and contributing nearly $565 billion to the nation’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in 2018. The industry has cumulatively offered consumers more than $10 billion in premium relief on auto insurance this spring and made over $220 million in charitable donations to COVID-19-related causes.

FAIR will serve as a go-to educational resource for the media, business community, and broader public in the coming weeks and will actively engage in a variety of insurance and COVID-19-related developments across America.

For more information visit fairinsure.org and follow @FAIRInsure on Twitter.

U.S. Treasury weighs in on debate surrounding business interruption insurance

The U.S. Treasury Department issued a letter to members of Congress on May 8 which argued that proposals to force insurers to retroactively change business interruption (BI) policies to pay losses arising from the COVID-19 pandemic threaten the ability of the industry to serve policyholders and might lead to the insolvency of the industry.

In the letter, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Legislative Affairs Frederick Vaughan writes: “While insurers should pay valid claims, we share your concerns that these proposals fundamentally conflict with the contractual nature of insurance obligations and could introduce stability risks to the industry.”

He goes on to say that the Treasury will collaborate with insurer groups, federal lawmakers and states on “addressing losses attributable to the current and potential future pandemics.”

Business Interruption Coverage: Policy Language Rules

Whether business interruption coverage in property policies applies to COVID-19-related losses has become one of the dominant insurance debates during this pandemic. Lawsuits have been filed – some even before insurers have denied a claim – seeking to establish that policyholders are entitled to coverage for losses sustained during the current shutdowns. 

The debate often focuses on a simple phrase in the insurance policy: “direct physical loss or damage.” Business interruption coverage can apply to losses stemming from direct physical loss or damage. Losses that didn’t come from direct physical damages aren’t covered.

Michael Menapace, Esq.
Wiggin and Dana LLP

 “A property policy may, for example, pay to repair the damage caused by a fire and may cover the loss of business during the reconstruction period,” writes Michael Menapace, a professor of insurance law at Quinnipiac University School of Law and a Triple-I Non-Resident Scholar. “But here’s the rub.  Are the business interruptions related to COVID-19 caused by physical damage to property?”

Insurers say no, arguing that “damage to property” requires structural alteration like one would find in a typical claim, where, say, a fire destroyed the interior of a building or wind damaged windows and furniture.

The virus, on the other hand, leaves no visible imprint. Left alone, it can’t survive long and, after it has perished, whatever it was attached to is as good as before. Even if some remediation is needed – like cleaning metal surfaces – insurers might argue that this is no different from cleaning dirt off a surface. They cite cases in which judges have ruled there’s no physical damage from mold if the mold can be cleaned off.

Departing from common sense

Others depart from this common-sense, legally recognized definition. Some plaintiffs’ attorneys argue that if coronavirus is not direct physical damage then insurers would not have created an exclusion for viruses in the first place. Many insurers added exclusions for losses from viruses and communicable diseases after the SARS outbreak in 2003. 

Policy language, Menapace says, controls whether COVID-19 interruptions are covered. Some policies have standard terms and exclusions, some provide “all-risk” coverage – covering loss arising from any fortuitous cause except those specifically excluded – and others are variations on these types.

“The threshold issue will be whether the insureds can prove their business losses are caused by ‘physical damage to property’,” he writes. 

In past cases, where there is direct physical loss to property – such as contaminated food that couldn’t be sold or a building rendered useless by asbestos contamination – courts have found business interruption coverage was triggered. But when an earthquake caused a power loss in two factories, courts found the only injury was a shutdown of manufacturing operations that didn’t constitute “direct physical loss or damage.” 

What About Current Claims?

Are business interruptions related to COVID-19 the result of the government restrictions, or are they due to the physical loss to their property?  Menapace writes that many of the current claims would seem not to trigger the standard coverage in a commercial business interruption policy, but he cautions that this might not always be the case.

A true “all-risk policy,” he writes, “generally would not distinguish between business interruption losses due to government action or direct physical loss because all-risk policies cover all losses except those specifically excluded.”

But most commercial property policies aren’t true “all-risk policies”; instead, they typically cover business interruption losses “caused by direct physical damage to property” at or near the insured premises. 

“That will be difficult burden for policyholders to meet,” Menapace says.

Some policies exclude coverage for losses resulting from mold, fungi, or bacteria.  Because COVID-19 is a virus, that exclusion might not apply. Other policies exclude viruses, diseases, or pandemics. 

“If a policyholder believes it may have a claim,” Menapace advises, “it should provide prompt notice to its insurer(s) so it does not risk a denial based on late notice. Likewise, once the claim has been made, it is essential that the insured cooperate with the insurer, including providing timely proof of loss.”

Resources:

Business Income (Interruption): Key Facts

The True Cost of Rewriting Business Income (Interruption) Policies

Triple-I Briefing: Surplus Is Key to Insurers Keeping Policyholder PromisesISO Excluded Coronavirus Coverage 15 Years Ago

Economy Starts Reopening Amid New Pandemic Projections

Business interruption insurance and liability issues remain on the front burners as governments begin gradually “reopening the economy” amid scary new projections about the pandemic.

Trump Says Task Force Will Wind Down (The New York Times, May 5, 2020)

Pennsylvania’s Coronavirus Death Toll More Than Tripled in New Projection (Lehigh Valley Live, May 5, 2020)

Models Project Sharp Rise in Deaths as States Reopen (The New York Times, May 4, 2020)

D.C. Business Interruption Insurance Move on Hold

A measure that would make it easier for small businesses in Washington, D.C. to claim coronavirus-related damages under business interruption insurance policies is on hold after six of the 12 D.C. Council members raised concerns about its legality and the costs it could impose on insurers.

Council Chairman Phil Mendelson struck the language from a broader pandemic emergency bill to allow for more debate. Councilman Charles Allen had spearheaded the measure after many small businesses have seen their insurers deny such claims.

The American Property Casualty Insurance Association estimates local businesses could claim losses of hundreds of millions of dollars each month.

“These numbers dwarf the premiums for all relevant commercial property risks in the key insurance lines for D.C., which are estimated at $16 million a month,” David Sampson, the association’s president and CEO, wrote in a statement. “We oppose constitutionally flawed legislation that retroactively rewrites insurance contracts and threatens the stability of the sector, to the detriment of all policyholders.”

Lloyd’s Syndicate Slams ‘Direct Physical Loss’ Claim in COVID Suit (Business Insurance, May 6, 2020)

Coalition Proposes Recovery Fund to Help Businesses During COVID-19 (Property/Casualty 360, May 5, 2020)

A.M. Best: BI Insurers Face ‘Existential Threat’ if Forced to Cover COVID-19 (Best’s Insurance News & Analysis, May 5, 2020)

Utah Governor Signs Bill Shielding Businesses, Property Owners from Coronavirus-Related Suits (The Salt Lake Tribune, May 4, 2020)

Managing Risk as Businesses Reopen After COVID-19 (Property/Casualty 360, May 4, 2020)

U.K. Companies to Shun Business Interruption Insurance (Financial Times, May 3, 2020)

Care Homes Seek Shield From Lawsuits

Faced with 20,000 coronavirus deaths and counting, the nation’s nursing homes are pushing back against a potential flood of lawsuits with a sweeping lobbying effort to get states to grant them emergency protection from claims of inadequate care.

The Associated Press reports that at least 15 states have enacted laws or governors’ orders that explicitly or apparently provide nursing homes and long-term care facilities some protection from lawsuits arising from the crisis. And in the case of New York, which leads the nation in deaths in such facilities, a lobbying group wrote the first draft of a measure that apparently makes it the only state with specific protection from both civil lawsuits and criminal prosecution.

Feds Consider Relaxing Infection Control in U.S. Nursing Homes (USA Today, May 5, 2020)

1,700 More Nursing Home Deaths From COVID-19 Now Reported in New York (CNY Central, May 5, 2020)

The Grim Post-COVID-19 Future for Nursing Homes (Forbes, May 4, 2020)

Data Shows Reach of COVID-19 in Illinois Nursing Homes: At Least 286 Deaths (Chicago Tribune, April 19, 2020)

CORONAVIRUS WRAP-UP: PROPERTY AND CASUALTY (4/27/2020)

Accounting Rules
NAIC Working Group Approves Flexible COVID-19 Accounting Rules
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How the Coronavirus Could Change U.S. Personal Auto Insurance
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Travelers, Insured Law Firm Spar Over Civil Authority Business Income Loss Claim
States Seek to Force Insurance Companies to Pay Those With Business Interruption Policies
Covid-19 Business Interruption Existential Threat, Reinsurance Capital Availability Key: Willis Re
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Governments should backstop trade credit
Litigation
The Race Is on to Lead Business Interruption Insurance Litigation
What Won’t Cure Corona: Lawsuits
6 Types Of Employment Lawsuits To Expect In The Wake Of COVID-19
Editorial: Stopping a Lawsuit Epidemic
Kudlow: Businesses shouldn’t be held liable for employees and customers getting coronavirus
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Profits & Losses
Coronavirus Costs Weigh on Travelers’ Profit
Coronavirus Will Be Largest Event in Insurance History, Says Chubb CEO
Coronavirus To Be Largest Industry Loss Ever: Chubb’s Greenberg & Lloyd’s Neal
Covid-19 P&C Insurance Industry Loss Estimated $40bn – $80bn: Dowling
Chubb Classifies Covid-19 as a Catastrophe Event
Covid-19 Claims Manageable, But Reinsurers Face Formidable Challenges: Willis Re
Specialty Lines
Companies Can Expect Higher D&O Rates, Lower Limits: Experts
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Workers Compensation
States Easing Path to Workers Compensation Benefits for Coronavirus Workers
Changing Virus Guidance Creates Balancing Act For Essential Employers
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Workplace Safety For COVID-19 Essential Workers
From the Triple-I Blog:
TRIPLE-I CEO AMONG PANELISTS DISCUSSING BUSINESS INTERRUPTION INSURANCE LEGISLATION
INSURERS RESPOND TO COVID-19 (4/24/2020)
CORONAVIRUS WRAP-UP: LIFE AND HEALTH INSURANCE (4/22/2020)
CORONAVIRUS WRAP-UP: DATA AND VISUALIZATIONS (4/20/2020)

Triple-I CEO Among Panelists Discussing Business Interruption Insurance Legislation

Sean Kevelighan

Triple-I CEO Sean Kevelighan today joined legislators and legal experts to discuss proposed measures that could retroactively rewrite business interruption insurance policies.

“The insurance industry is applying forward-thinking solutions to take care of its customers, communities, and employees during the COVID-19 crisis,” Kevelighan said, citing more than $10 billion so far returned to customers through premium relief; $200 million in charitable donations; and insurers pledging not to lay off employees during the crisis and implementing innovative solutions to conduct daily operations while respecting social distancing. “We’re deeply engaged in mitigating the economic impact of this pandemic.”

But the industry can only do these things – while keeping its promises to policyholders and preparing for impending catastrophes – if policyholder surplus isn’t eliminated, as it could be if some of the proposed legislative “solutions” were enacted.

Legislation has been discussed or introduced in Louisiana, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and South Carolina that would retroactively enact business interruption coverage into existing policies despite an absence of the physical damage required in property policies and/or express exclusions for communicable diseases in those policies.

Kevelighan explained how policyholder surplus provides a cushion that enables insurers to meet their obligations, even when large, unexpected catastrophes occur. He showed how retroactively rewriting insurance contracts could make it impossible for insurers to play their critical role as “financial first responders.”

The scenarios he discussed could cost the industry $150 billion and $380 billion per month – “quickly eliminating the surplus it has taken the industry centuries to accumulate.”

And they would do this in the midst of a tornado season that is shaping up to be the deadliest in eight years and as a “more active than normal” hurricane season approaches.

Kevelighan made his remarks during a webinar sponsored by the National Council of Insurance Legislators (NCOIL) and the Rutgers Center for Risk and Responsibility at Rutgers Law School. Other panelists included NCOIL President and Indiana Rep. Matt Lehman; New Jersey Assemblyman Lou Greenwald; and Jay Feinman and Adam Scales, Professors of Law at Rutgers Law School and Co-Directors of the Rutgers Center for Risk and Responsibility.

The panelists all expressed support for the creation of a COVID-19 Business Interruption and Cancellation Claims Fund, similar to the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund enacted by Congress in 2001, for businesses suffering from costs related to the interruption of their businesses, as well as the many associations that have had to cancel events. Funded by the federal government and operated by a special federal administrator, it would facilitate distribution of federal funds and liquidity to impacted businesses during this time of incalculable business interruption.

Click here to view the presentation.

Triple-I Briefing: Surplus
Is Key to Insurers Keeping
Policyholder Promises

The insurance industry can meet its obligations to policyholders in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic – but government interventions being discussed threaten to unravel this safety net and could make it impossible for insurers to affordably provide essential coverage in the future.  

These are among the conclusions shared by Triple-I chief economist Steven Weisbart and senior economist Michel Léonard in a briefing today that explained how the industry already has been affected by the pandemic and subsequent recession; how policyholder surplus ensures funds are available to cover claims; and how any attempt to retroactively apply this pandemic to business interruption policies would cause irreparable harm to the financial stability of the property-casualty insurance industry. 

“Insurers price their policies for expected claims, with additional monies set aside for unexpected claims, such as those which are filed during exceptionally severe hurricane seasons,” Dr. Weisbart said. “The policyholders’ surplus backs up every line of insurance each insurer writes. It is calculated as assets, minus liabilities, and rises and falls due to changes in asset values.”   

Dr. Weisbart and Dr. Leonard explained in detail how surplus works and showed how – under a variety of plausible scenarios – retroactively rewriting insurance contracts could make it impossible for insurers to play their critical role as financial first responders

“If insurers nationwide had to pay business interruption policy claims for which they collected no premium, it could cost the industry each month anywhere from roughly $150 billion to nearly as high as $380 billion,” said Léonard, noting that the smaller amount accounted for the U.S.’s small and medium-size businesses that currently have business interruption coverage and the larger amount includes those who do not. “Pandemic-caused losses are excluded from standard business interruption policies because they impact all businesses, all at the same time.”   

If you missed the briefing, you can view the presentation.  

Related Links: 

Coronavirus: Issues and impacts  

Triple-I Fact Sheet: Insurers Are Engaged In the COVID-19 Crisis
Triple-I Publication: A Firm Foundation: How Insurance Supports the Economy

Triple-I Publication: A Firm Foundation: How Insurance Supports the Economy

 
Triple-I Blog

COVID-19: Learning From History 

COVID-19: A Teachable Moment for Thinking About Risk