Crime

Crime

PROPERTY CRIME BY MONTH

There were over 98 million property crimes in 2011, including figures for burglary, larceny theft, and motor vehicle theft. Larceny theft involves the successful or attempted taking of property from another; it includes shoplifting, pocket-picking, purse-snatching and bicycle theft. Burglary involves the unlawful entry into a structure such as a home or business. The summer months (June, July, August and September), have the most property crimes, followed by December, according to an FBI analysis based on 2009 data.

CAMPUS CRIME

Crime is a serious problem for college campuses. There were about 21,000 burglaries on U.S. college campuses in 2011, according to the U.S. Department of Education’s Campus Safety and Security division. The same year there were 3,600 motor vehicle thefts, 1,600 robberies and 640 arson crimes on campus.

CRIME: PROPERTY

The Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Uniform Crime Reports defines property crime as larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft and burglary. These crimes involve the unlawful taking of money or property without the use of force or threat of force against the victims. Larceny theft involves the successful or attempted taking of property from another; it includes shoplifting, pocket-picking, purse-snatching and bicycle theft. While the theft of motor vehicles is a separate offense category, the thefts of motor vehicle parts and accessories are considered larceny. Burglary involves the unlawful entry into a structure such as a home or business. The burglary rate for renters was about 50 percent higher than for owners from in 2011, according to a 2013 Bureau of Justice Statistics report. Home burglaries accounted for 75 percent of burglary offenses in 2012, according to the FBI.

 

NUMBER AND RATE OF PROPERTY CRIME OFFENSES IN THE UNITED STATES, 2003-2012 (1)

  Burglary Larceny-theft
Year Number Rate Number Rate
2003 2,154,834 741.0 7,026,802 2,416.5
2004 2,144,446 730.3 6,937,089 2,362.3
2005 2,155,448 726.9 6,783,447 2,287.8
2006 2,194,993 733.1 6,626,363 2,213.2
2007 2,190,198 726.1 6,591,542 2,185.4
2008 2,228,887 733.0 6,586,206 2,166.1
2009 2,203,313 717.7 6,338,095 2,064.5
2010 2,168,459 701.0 6,204,601 2,005.8
2011 2,185,140 701.3 6,151,095 1,974.1
2012 2,103,787 670.2 6,150,598 1,959.3
  Motor vehicle theft Total property crime (2)
Year Number Rate Number Rate
2003 1,261,226 433.7 10,442,862 3,591.2
2004 1,237,851 421.5 10,319,386 3,514.1
2005 1,235,859 416.8 10,174,754 3,431.5
2006 1,198,245 400.2 10,019,601 3,346.6
2007 1,100,472 364.9 9,882,212 3,276.4
2008 959,059 315.4 9,774,152 3,214.6
2009 795,652 259.2 9,337,060 3,041.3
2010 739,565 239.1 9,112,625 2,945.9
2011 716,508 230.0 9,052,743 2,905.4
2012 721,053 229.7 8,975,438 2,859.2

(1) Rate is per 100,000 inhabitants.
(2) Property crimes are the offenses of burglary, larceny-theft and motor vehicle theft.

Source: U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Crime Reports.

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TOP TEN U.S. METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS BY MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT RATE, 2013

 

Rank Metropolitan Statistical Area (1) Vehicles stolen Rate (2)
1 Bakersfield, CA 6,267 725.24
2 Fresno, CA 6,750 706.61
3 Modesto, CA 3,565 678.41
4 San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA 29,326 649.34
5 Stockton-Lodi, CA 4,463 633.61
6 Redding, CA 1,120 625.77
7 Spokane-Spokane Valley, WA 3,205 598.26
8 Vallejo-Fairfield, CA 2,540 597.95
9 San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA 10,925 569.12
10 Yuba City, CA 930 551.31

(1) Metropolitan Statistical Areas are designated by the federal Office of Management and Budget and usually include areas much larger than the cities for which they are named.
(2) Rate of vehicle thefts reported per 100,000 people based on the 2013 U.S. Census Population Estimates.

Source: National Insurance Crime Bureau.

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TOP TEN MOST FREQUENTLY STOLEN PASSENGER VEHICLES, 2013

Rank Model (1) Thefts
1 Honda Accord 53,995
2 Honda Civic 45,001
3 Chevrolet Pickup (Full Size) 27,809
4 Ford Pickup (Full Size) 26,494
5 Toyota Camry 14,420
6 Dodge Pickup (Full Size) 11,347
7 Dodge Caravan 10,911
8 Jeep Cherokee/Grand Cherokee 9,272
9 Toyota Corolla 9,010
10 Nissan Altima 8,892

(1) Includes all model years for each vehicle.

Source: National Insurance Crime Bureau.

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ARSON

Arson, the act of deliberately setting fire to a building, car or other property for fraudulent or malicious purposes, is a crime in all states.

Church arsons, a major problem in the 1990s, have dropped significantly. Intentional fires in religious and funeral properties fell 82 percent from 1,320 in 1980 to 240 in 2002, the last time such figures were tracked. There were 1,600 structural fires in houses of worship which caused $105 million in property damage on average from 2007-2011, according to the National Fire Protection Association. Fires in a larger category, religious and funeral properties, averaged 1,780 during the same five years. Among those fires, 16 percent, or about 285 each year, were intentional.

 

INTENTIONALLY SET FIRES, 2003-2012

  Structures Vehicles (2)
Year Number of fires Property loss
($ millions) (1)
Number of fires Property loss
($ millions)
2003 37,500 $692 30,500 $132
2004 36,500 714 36,000 165
2005 31,500 664 21,000 113
2006 31,100 755 20,500 134
2007 32,500 733 20,500 145
2008 30,500 866 17,500 139
2009 26,500 684 15,000 108
2010 27,500 585 14,000 89
2011 26,500 601 13,000 88
2012 26,000 581 12,500 480 (3)

(1) Includes overall direct property loss to contents, structures, vehicles, machinery, vegetation or any other property involved in a fire. Excludes indirect losses, such as business interruption or temporary shelter costs.
(2) Includes highway vehicles, trains, boats, ships, aircraft and farm and construction vehicles.
(3) Includes $400 million in property loss from an intentionally set fire aboard the submarine USS Miami.

Source: National Fire Protection Association.

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  • In 2012 property loss from intentionally set structure fires fell 3.3 percent from 2011, according to the National Fire Protection Association, as the number of fires fell 1.9 percent.
  • Intentionally set fires in vehicles fell 3.9 percent in 2012. However, the property loss from those fires rose 445.5 percent to $480 million, due to the inclusion of $400 million in losses from an intentionally set fire aboard a U.S. submarine.