Facts + Statistics: U.S. catastrophes

 
2019 natural catastrophes

Aon defines a catastrophe as a natural event that causes $25 million or more in insured property losses, or 10 deaths; or 50 people injured; or 2,000 filed claims or homes and structures damaged. Aon’s natural catastrophe estimates include Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands and include losses sustained by private insurers and government-sponsored programs such as the National Flood Insurance Program. They are subject to change as loss estimates are further developed. Natural catastrophe losses in the United States rose to an historic high in 2017 of $137 billion in 2020 dollars, the year of Hurricanes Harvey, Maria and Irma and costly California wildfires. Natural catastrophe losses fell 55 percent in 2018 and 36 percent in 2019, when they totaled $39.6 billion in 2020 dollars.

 
Natural Catastrophe Losses In The United States, 2019 (1)

($ millions)

Event Number of events (2) Fatalities Overall losses Insured losses (3)
Severe thunderstorm 49 70 $27,000 $20,300
Winter storms and cold waves 16 73 7,400 2,100
Tropical cyclone 5 16 3,900 1,900
Wildfire, heat waves, and drought 9 11 1,300 830
Flood, flash flood 9 7 10100 200
Earthquake and geopyhsical 2 3 180 50
Total 90 180 $49,900 $25,500

(1) As of May 2020.
(2) Events that have caused at least one fatality or losses of $3 million or more.
(3) Sourced from Property Claim Services based on property losses including, if applicable, agricultural, offshore, marine, aviation and National Flood Insurance Progam losses; may differ from data shown elsewhere.

Source: © 2020 Munich Re, NatCatSERVICE, Property Claim Services®, a unit of ISO®, a Verisk Analytics® business.

View Archived Tables

 
Natural Catastrophes By Quarter, 2019 (1)

($ millions)

Quarter Estimated insured losses
1 $9,210
2 13,760
3 10,230
4 5,930
Full year $39,130

(1) Natural disasters that cause at least $25 million in insured losses; or 10 deaths; or 50 people injured; or 2,000 filed claims or homes and structures damaged. Includes Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Includes losses sustained by private insurers and government-sponsored programs such as the National Flood Insurance Program. Subject to change as loss estimates are further developed. As of November 25, 2020.

Source: Aon.

View Archived Tables

 
Estimated Insured Property Losses, U.S. Natural Catastrophes, 2010-2019 (1)

($ billions)

Year In dollars when occurred In 2020 dollars (2)
2010 $19.2 $22.7
2011 48.4 55.7
2012 63.5 71.5
2013 24.1 26.8
2014 23.2 25.3
2015 22.9 25.0
2016 31.6 34.1
2017 130.8 137.4
2018 60.4 62.0
2019 39.2 39.6

(1) Natural disasters that cause at least $25 million in insured losses; or 10 deaths; or 50 people injured; or 2,000 filed claims or homes and structures damaged. Includes Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Includes losses sustained by private insurers and government-sponsored programs such as the National Flood Insurance Program. Subject to change as loss estimates are further developed. As of November 25, 2020.
(2) Adjusted for inflation by Aon using the U.S. Consumer Price Index.

Source: Aon.

View Archived Tables

 
Top 10 Costliest Natural Catastrophes, United States (1)

($ millions)

      Estimated insured property loss
Rank Year Peril Dollars when occurred In 2020 dollars (2)
1 2005 Hurricane Katrina $65,000 $85,570
2 2012 Hurricane Sandy 30,000 33,530
3 2017 Hurricane Harvey 30,000 31,590
4 2017 Hurricane Irma 29,900 31,320
5 2017 Hurricane Maria 29,670 31,100
6 1992 Hurricane Andrew 16,000 29,360
7 1994 Northridge Earthquake 15,300 27,060
8 2008 Hurricane Ike 18,200 21,510
9 2012 Drought loss 14,390 16,420
10 2005 Hurricane Wilma 10,670 13,840

(1) Natural disasters that cause at least $25 million in insured losses; or 10 deaths; or 50 people injured; or 2,000 filed claims or homes and structures damaged. Includes Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Includes losses sustained by private insurers and government-sponsored programs such as the National Flood Insurance Program. Subject to change as loss estimates are further developed. As of November 25, 2020.
(2) Adjusted for inflation by Aon using the U.S. Consumer Price Index.

Source: Aon.

View Archived Tables

Below are charts from Munich Re, which include flood insurance losses in its calculations. The reinsurer estimated insured natural catastrophe losses in the United States for 2018 at $52 billion.

 
Loss Events in the U.S., 1980-2018

(Number of relevant events by peril)

Source: © 2019 Munich Re, Geo Risks Research, NatCatSERVICE. As of March 2019. 

View Archived Graphs

 
Loss Events in the U.S., 1980-2018

(Overall and insured losses)

Source: © 2019 Munich Re, Geo Risks Research, NatCatSERVICE. As of March 2019. 

View Archived Graphs

 
Loss Events in the U.S., 1980-2018

(Overall losses: nominal, inflation adjusted, and normalized)

Source: © 2019 Munich Re, Geo Risks Research, NatCatSERVICE. As of March 2019. 

View Archived Graphs

 
Convective Storm Events* in the U.S., 1980-2018

(Overall and insured losses)

Source: © 2019 Munich Re, Geo Risks Research, NatCatSERVICE. As of March 2019. 

View Archived Graphs

 
Convective Storm Events* in the U.S., 1980-2018

(Overall losses: nominal, inflation adjusted, and normalized)

Source: © 2019 Munich Re, Geo Risks Research, NatCatSERVICE. As of March 2019. 

View Archived Graphs

 
Tropical Storms and Hurricanes in the U.S., 1980-2018

(Insured property losses per state)

Source: © 2019 Munich Re, Geo Risks Research, NatCatSERVICE. As of March 2019.

View Archived Graphs

 
Tropical Storms and Hurricanes in the U.S., 1980-2018

(Overall losses: nominal, inflation adjusted, and normalized)

Source: © 2019 Munich Re, Geo Risks Research, NatCatSERVICE. As of March 2019.

View Archived Graphs

Back to top

Catastrophes
Facts + Statistics: Hurricanes
Catastrophes
Facts + Statistics: Tornadoes and thunderstorms
Catastrophes
Facts + Statistics: Wildfires
Catastrophes
Facts + Statistics: Earthquakes and tsunamis
Catastrophes | Homeowners
Facts + Statistics: Flood insurance