Background on: Motorcycle crashes

 

The topic

In 2015, 4,976 people died in motorcycle crashes, up 8.3 percent from 4,594 in 2014, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). In 2015, motorcyclists were 29 times more likely than passenger car occupants to die in a crash per vehicle mile traveled, and almost five times more likely to be injured.

(Note: statistics on fatal motorcycle crashes are also available from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.)

Key facts

  • According to the latest data available from the Federal Highway Administration, there were 8.6 million private and commercial motorcycles on U.S. roads in 2015, compared with 8.0 million in 2009.
  • 2015 crash data: According to the U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 4,976 people died in motorcycle crashes in 2015, up 8.3 percent from 4,594 in 2014. In 2015, 88,000 motorcyclists were injured, down 4.3 percent from 92,000 in 2014.
  • In 2015, 40 percent of motorcyclists killed in motor vehicle traffic crashes were not wearing a helmet.
  • The fatality rate per registered vehicle for motorcyclists in 2015 was six times the fatality rate for passenger car occupants, according to NHTSA.
  • Motorcycle theft: The National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) reported that motorcycle thefts rose 2 percent in 2016 to 46,467 from 45,555 a year earlier, based on data from the National Crime Information Center of the FBI. However, motorcycle thefts are down 30 percent from 2006 when they totaled 66,774, according to the NICB.
  • The NICB’s report also details the seasonal nature of motorcycle thefts. More motorcycles are stolen during warm months—August and July had the most motorcycle thefts in 2016 while February had the fewest. The top five makes stolen in 2016, from highest to lowest, were American Honda Motor Co., Yamaha Motor Corporation, American Suzuki Motor Corporation, Kawasaki Motors Corp. and Harley-Davidson Inc. California had the most motorcycle thefts in 2016, followed by Florida and Texas. By city, New York, New York, had the most thefts, followed by San Diego, CA and Las Vegas, Nevada.
TOP FIVE
MOTORCYCLE
MAKES STOLEN, 2016
  TOP FIVE STATES IN
MOTORCYCLE
THEFTS, 2016
  TOP FIVE CITIES IN
MOTORCYCLE
THEFTS, 2016
1. American Honda Motor Co., Inc. 9,052   1 California 7,506   1. New York City, NY 1,209
2. Yamaha Motor Corporation 7,723   2. Florida 4,882   2. San Diego, CA 849
3. American Suzuki Motor Corporation 6,229   3. Texas 3,692   3. Las Vegas, NV 818
4. Kawasaki Motors Corp., USA 5,221   4. South Carolina 2,057   4. Los Angeles, CA 760
5. Harley-Davidson Inc. 4,953   5. North Carolina   5. San Francisco, CA 616+
  • The recovery rate of 2016 motorcycle thefts was 40 percent. The number of motorcycles recovered rose 4 percent from 2015 to 2016.

 

Fatalities and injuries

According to the U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) the following terms are used to define motorcycle occupants: a motorcycle rider is the operator only; a passenger is any person seated on the motorcycle but not in control of the motorcycle; and any combined reference to the motorcycle rider (operator) as well as the passenger will be referred to as motorcyclists.

According to NHTSA,  in 2015, 4,976 people died in motorcycle crashes, up 8 percent from 4,594 in 2014. In addition, 88,000 motorcyclists were injured, down 3 percent from 92,000 in 2014. In 2015, 40 percent of the motorcyclists killed were not wearing helmets.

By age: Older motorcyclists account for more than half of all motorcyclist fatalities. NHTSA data show that in 2015, 54 percent of motorcyclists killed in crashes were age 40 or over, compared with 47 percent in 2005. The number of motorcyclists age 40 and over killed in crashes increased by 17 percent from 2006 to 2015. In contrast, fatalities among all motorcyclists rose 3 percent. NHTSA says that the average age of motorcycle riders killed in crashes was 42 in 2015, compared with 39 in 2006.

Older riders appear to sustain more serious injuries than younger riders. Researchers from Brown University cited declines in vision and reaction time, along with the larger-sized bikes that older riders favor, which tend to roll over more often, and the increased fragility among older people as the causes. The study used data on riders age 20 and over who needed emergency medical care following motorcycle crashes from 2001 to 2008. The riders were put in three groups by age: 20 to 39, 40 to 59, and 60 and over. The data showed that while injury rates were rising for all age groups, the steepest rise occurred in the 60 and over group, who were two and a half times more likely to have serious injuries than the youngest group. They were three times more likely to be admitted to the hospital. The middle and older groups were also more likely to sustain fractures, dislocations and other injuries, such as brain damage, than the youngest group. The authors published findings in the journal Injury Prevention in February 2013. The study is entitled Injury patterns and severity among motorcyclists treated in US emergency departments, 2001–2008: a comparison of younger and older riders.

By driver behavior

Alcohol use: According to NHTSA, in 2015, 27 percent of motorcycle riders who were involved in fatal crashes had a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 percent or over (the national definition of drunk driving). This compares with 21 percent of passenger car drivers, 20 percent for light truck drivers involved in fatal crashes, and with 2 percent of large truck drivers.

In 2015, fatally-injured motorcycle riders between the ages of 35 to 39 had the highest rate of alcohol involvement (37 percent), followed by the 45 to 49 age group (36 percent).

In 2015 motorcycle riders killed in traffic crashes at night were almost three times more likely to have BAC levels of 0.08 percent or higher (42 percent) than those killed during the day (13 percent).

The reported helmet use rate for motorcycle riders with BACs at or over 0.08 percent who were killed in traffic crashes was 51 percent in 2015, compared with 65 percent for those who did not have any measurable blood alcohol.

Speeding: In 2015, 33 percent of all motorcycle riders involved in fatal crashes were speeding, compared with 19 percent for drivers of passenger cars, 15 percent for light truck drivers and 7 percent for large truck drivers, according to NHTSA.

Licensing: Twenty-seven percent of motorcycle riders who were involved in fatal crashes in 2015 were riding without a valid license, compared with 13 percent of passenger car drivers.

By type of motorcycle: According to a 2007 report from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), riders of “super sports” motorcycles have driver death rates per 10,000 registered vehicles nearly four times higher than those for drivers of other types of motorcycles. Super sports can reach speeds of up to 190 mph. The light-weight bikes, built for racing, are modified for street use and are popular with riders under the age of 30. In 2005 these bikes registered 22.5 driver deaths per 10,000 registered vehicles, compared with 10.7 deaths for other sport models. Standards and cruisers, and touring bikes (with upright handlebars) have rates of 5.7 and 6.5, respectively, per 10,000 vehicles. In 2005 super sports accounted for 9 percent of registrations, and standards and cruisers made up 51 percent of registrations. Among fatally injured drivers, the IIHS says that drivers of super sports were the youngest—with an average age of 27. Touring motorcycle drivers were the oldest, 51 years old. Fatally injured drivers of other sports models were 34, on average; standard and cruiser drivers were 44 years old. Speeding and driver error were bigger factors in super sport and sport fatal crashes. Speed was cited in 57 percent of super sport fatal crashes in 2005 and in 46 percent for sport model riders. Speed was a factor in 27 percent of fatal crashes of cruisers and standards and 22 percent of touring models.

Losses

Collision losses by type: A 2014 Highway Loss Data Institute report shows that super sport motorcycles had the highest relative overall losses when compared with nine other motorcycle classes. Based on collision coverage results for 2009 to 2013 model motorcycles insured under private passenger motorcycle policies, relative overall losses for super sport models were indexed at 345, compared with 100 for all motorcycles. The high overall losses for super sport models was driven up by their high claim frequency. Super sports have engines that deliver more horsepower per pound than a typical NASCAR vehicle, reaching speeds of nearly 190 miles per hour and are built on racing platforms but are modified for the highway.

The Government Accounting Office (GAO) estimated that in 2010 motorcycle crashes cost $16 billion in direct costs such as emergency services, medical costs including rehabilitation, property damage, loss of market productivity including lost wages, loss in household productivity and insurance costs, including claims and the cost of defense attorneys. The GAO found that market productivity loss produced the largest cost, 44 percent of total costs, followed by medical costs, at 18 percent. Other costs such as long-term medical costs were not included. The GAO recommends that NHTSA grants to states for motorcycle safety, which totaled $45.9 million from fiscal years 2006 to 2012, be expanded from motorcyclist training and motorist awareness efforts to include programs that increase helmet use, safety awareness and educating police about motorcycle safety. In addition, the GAO urges NHTSA to identify research priorities, conduct research on promising strategies, implement a graduated licensing model (See Insurance Issues Updates: Teen Drivers) and encourage motorcyclists to improve their visibility to other motorists. The study is entitled Increasing Federal Funding Flexibility and Identifying Research Priorities Would Help Support States’ Safety Efforts.

Safety issues

Training courses: The Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF, http://www.msf-usa.org), sponsored by motorcycle manufacturers and distributors, works with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), state governments and other organizations to improve motorcycle safety through education, training and licensing. Since 1974 about 6 million motorcyclists have taken MSF training courses. The organization also works with the states to integrate rider safety and skills in licensing tests. It also promotes safety by recommending motorcycle operators wear protective gear, especially helmets, ride sober and ride within their skill limits.

As of February 2013, three states (Connecticut, Delaware and Tennessee) mandated insurance discounts for motorcycle drivers who complete approved motorcycle training courses, according to the National Association of Insurance Commissioners.

Antilock Braking Systems (ABS): Stopping a motorcycle is more complex than stopping a car. Motorcycles have separate brakes for the front and rear wheels, and braking hard can lock the wheels and cause the bike to overturn. Not braking hard enough can put the rider into harm’s way. With ABS, a rider can brake fully without fear of locking up. The system automatically reduces brake pressure when a lockup is about to occur and increases it again after traction is restored. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) said in March 2010 that motorcycles with antilock brakes versus those without are 37 percent less likely to be in fatal crashes. The IIHS’s affiliate, the Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI), found that collision claims were filed 23 percent less often for antilock-equipped motorcycles than for the same models without antilock brakes. Medical claims related to riders’ injuries were 34 percent less frequent than with bikes that did not have antilock brakes. HLDI studied ABS and non-ABS versions of 22 motorcycles from the 2003-2012 model years. In addition the 2012 analysis found that motorcyclists with antilock brakes were 30 percent less likely to have a collision claim within the first 90 days of a policy and 19 percent less likely afterward.

Airbags: Honda Motorcycle Company is the first company to offer the option of an airbag, which is available on one of the most expensive models. The option became available in 2006. A handful of companies have recently developed wearable airbags, which are worn either inside a jacket or strapped on outside. No data on the effectiveness of these new items has been published.

Motorcycle helmets: According to NHTSA, in 2015 motorcycle helmets saved 1,772 lives. Helmets are estimated to be 37 percent effective in preventing fatal injuries for motorcycle riders (operators) and 41 percent effective for motorcycle passengers.

Motorcycle helmet use laws: According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, 19 states and the District of Columbia had laws on the books requiring all motorcyclists to wear helmets as of April 2016. (See chart below). In another 28 states only people under a specific age (mostly between 17 and 20 years of age) were required to wear helmets. Three states (Illinois, Iowa and New Hampshire) had no helmet use laws. A National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) study covering 10 states found that when universal helmet laws, which pertain to all riders, were repealed, helmet use rates dropped from 99 percent to 50 percent. In states where the universal law was reinstated, helmet use rates rose to above 95 percent.

According to NHTSA’s 2016 National Occupant Protection Use Survey, motorcycle helmet use was 65.3 percent in June 2016, compared with 60.7 percent in 2015. The survey only counts helmets that comply with Department of Transportation standards. Helmet use among motorcycle passengers was 52.5 percent in 2016, compared with 46.3 percent in 2015. Helmet use by motorcycle riders (operators) rose to 67.8 percent, compared with 63.9 percent in 2015. Helmet use was highest in the West, at 90.9 percent, up from 74.8 percent in 2015. In the Northeast helmet use was 70.7 percent, down from 77.2 percent in 2015. In the South helmet use rose in 2016 to 67.5 percent from 60.0 percent in 2015. Helmet use remains lowest in the Midwest in 2015 at 53.8 percent, up from 44.3 percent in 2015.

Usage rates are higher in states that have universal laws that require all riders to use helmets. In June 2016, 79.6 percent of motorcyclists in universal law states wore helmets, almost identical to 79.8 percent in 2015. In states without universal laws, usage was 53.5 percent in 2016, compared with 42.9 percent in 2015.

 In 2014, 10 times more unhelmeted motorcyclists died (1,565) in states that did not have universal helmet laws than in states that had universal helmet laws (151 unhelmeted motorcyclist fatalities), according to a NHTSA report.

 

STATE MOTORCYCLE HELMET USE LAWS

As of April 2016

  Universal law Partial law (1)
State    
Alabama X  
Alaska   17 and younger (2)
Arizona   17 and younger 
Arkansas   20 and younger
California X  
Colorado   17 and younger and their passengers 17 and younger
Connecticut   17 and younger
Delaware   18 and younger (3)
District of Columbia X  
Florida   20 and younger (4)
Georgia X  
Hawaii   17 and younger
Idaho   17 and younger 
Illinois    
Indiana   17 and younger 
Iowa    
Kansas   17 and younger 
Kentucky   20 and younger  (4), (5) 
Louisiana X  
Maine   17 and younger (5)
Maryland X  
Massachusetts X  
Michigan   20 and younger (6)
Minnesota   17 and younger (5)
Mississippi X  
Missouri X  
Montana   17 and younger 
Nebraska X  
Nevada X  
New Hampshire    
New Jersey X  
New Mexico   17 and younger 
New York X  
North Carolina X  
North Dakota   17 and younger (7)
Ohio   17 and younger (8)
Oklahoma   17 and younger 
Oregon X  
Pennsylvania   20 and younger (9)
Rhode Island   20 and younger (9)
South Carolina   20  and younger
South Dakota   17 and younger
Tennessee X  
Texas   20 and younger (4)
Utah   17 and younger 
Vermont X  
Virginia X  
Washington X  
West Virginia X  
Wisconsin   17 and younger (5)
Wyoming   17 and younger 

(1) Universal laws cover all riders; partial laws cover young riders or some adult riders.
(2) Alaska's motorcycle helmet use law covers passengers of all ages, operators younger than 18, and operators with instructional permits.
(3) In Delaware, every motorcycle operator or rider age 19 and older must carry an approved safety helmet.
(4) In Florida and Kentucky, the law requires that all riders younger than 21 years wear helmets, without exception. Those 21 years and older may ride without helmets only if they can show proof that they are covered by a medical insurance policy. Texas exempts riders 21 years or older if they either 1) can show proof of successfully completing a motorcycle operator training and safety course or 2) can show proof of  having a medical insurance policy.
(5) Motorcycle helmet laws in Kentucky, Maine, Minnesota, and Wisconsin also cover operators with instructional/learner's permits. Maine's motorcycle helmet use law also covers passengers 17 years and younger and passengers if their operators are required to wear a helmet.
(6) In Michigan, the law requires that all riders younger than 21 years wear helmets, without exception. Those 21 years and older may ride without helmets only if they carry additional insurance and have passed a motorcycle safety course or have had their motorcycle endorsement for at least two years. Motorcycle operators who want to exercise this option also must be 21 or older and carry additional insurance.
(7) North Dakota's motorcycle helmet use law covers all passengers traveling with operators who are covered by the law.
(8) Ohio's motorcycle helmet use law covers all operators during the first year of licensure and all passengers of operators who are covered by the law.
(9) Pennsylvania's motorcycle helmet use law covers all operators during the first two years of licensure unless the operator has completed the safety course approved by the Department of Transportation or the Motorcycle Safety Foundation. Rhode Island's motorcycle helmet use law covers all passengers (regardless of age) and all operators during the first year of licensure (regardless of age).

Source: Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, Highway Loss Data Institute.

 

 

Motorcycle Helmet Use, 1998-2016 (1)

 

Year Percent Year Percent
1998 67% 2010 54%
2000 71 2011 66
2005 48 2012 60
2006 51 2013 60
2007 58 2014 64
2008 63 2015 61
2009 67 2016 65

(1) Based on surveys of motorcyclists using helmets meeting Department of Transportation standards. Surveys conducted in October for 1996-2000 and in June thereafter.

Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, National Occupant Protection Use Survey, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's National Center for Statistics and Analysis.

View Archived Tables

 

 

Motorcyclist Fatalities And Fatality Rates, 2006-2015

 

Year Fatalities Registered motorcycles Fatality rate per 100,000 registered motorcycles Vehicle miles traveled (millions) Fatality rate per 100 million vehicle miles traveled
2006 4,837 6,678,958 72.42 12,049 40.14
2007 5,174 7,138,476 72.48 21,396 24.18
2008 5,312 7,752,926 68.52 20,811 25.52
2009 4,469 7,929,724 56.36 20,822 21.46
2010 4,518 8,009,503 56.41 18,513 24.40
2011 4,630 8,437,502 54.87 18,542 24.97
2012 4,986 8,454,939 58.97 21,385 23.32
2013 4,692 8,404,687 55.83 20,366 23.04
2014 4,594 8,417,718 54.58 19,970 23.00
2015 4,976 NA NA NA NA

NA=Data not available.

Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration; Federal Highway Administration.

View Archived Tables

 

 

Motorcyclist Injuries And Injury Rates, 2006-2015

 

Year Injuries Registered motorcycles Injury rate per 100,000 registered motorcycles Vehicle miles traveled (millions) Injury rate per 100 million vehicle miles traveled
2006 88,000 6,678,958 1,312 12,049 727
2007 103,000 7,138,476 1,443 21,396 481
2008 96,000 7,752,926 1,238 20,811 461
2009 90,000 7,929,724 1,130 20,822 430
2010 82,000 8,009,503 1,024 18,513 443
2011 81,000 8,437,502 965 18,542 439
2012 93,000 8,454,939 1,099 21,385 434
2013 88,000 8,404,687 1,052 20,366 434
2014 92,000 8,417,718 1,088 19,970 459
2015 88,000 NA NA NA NA

NA=Data not available.

Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration; Federal Highway Administration.

View Archived Tables

 

 

Occupant Fatality Rates By Vehicle Type, 2006 And 2015

 

Fatality rate Motorcycles Light trucks Passenger cars
2006      
     Per 100,000 registered vehicles 72.42 13.01 13.08
     Per 100 million vehicle miles traveled 40.14 1.10 1.11
2015      
     Per 100,000 registered vehicles 57.85 7.70 9.48
     Per 100 million vehicle miles traveled 25.38 0.72 0.89
Percent change, 2006-2015      
     Per 100,000 registered vehicles -20.1% -40.8% -27.5%
     Per 100 million vehicle miles traveled -36.8 -34.5 -19.8

Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

View Archived Tables

 

 

Motorcyclists Killed or Injured, by Time of Day and Day of Week, 2015

  Day of Week    
  Weekday Weekend Total
  Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent
Motorcyclists killed            
Midnight to 3 am 148 5.8% 267 11.1% 415 8.3%
3 am to 6 am 92 3.6 101 4.2 193 3.9
6 am to 9 am 229 9.0 65 2.7 294 5.9
9 am to Noon 234 9.2 207 8.6 441 8.9
Noon to 3 pm 411 16.1 339 14 750 15.1
3 pm to 6 pm 606 23.7 417 17.3 1,023 20.6
6 pm to 9 pm 480 18.8 595 24.6 1,075 21.6
9 pm to Midnight 345 13.5 411 17 756 15.2
Unknown 11 0.4 13 0.5 29 0.6
Total 2,556 100.0% 2,415 100.0% 4,976 (1) 100.0%
             
Motorcyclists injured            
Midnight to 3 am 1,000 2.5% 2,000 6.0% 4,000 4.1%
3 am to 6 am 1,000 1.8 1,000 2.6 2,000 2.2
6 am to 9 am 6,000 12.1 2,000 5 8,000 9.1
9 am to Noon 7,000 13.8 4,000 11.3 11,000 12.7
Noon to 3 pm 8,000 16.3 7,000 19.5 16,000 17.7
3 pm to 6 pm 14,000 27.5 6,000 17.1 20,000 23.1
6 pm to 9 pm 9,000 17.0 11,000 28.3 19,000 21.7
9 pm to Midnight 5,000 9.0 4,000 10 8,000 9.4
Total 51,000 100.0% 37,000 100.0% 88,000 100.0%

(1) Includes 5 motorcyclists killed on unknown day of week.

Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Safety Administration.

View Archived Tables

 

 

Vehicles Involved In Crashes By Vehicle Type And Crash Severity, 2006 And 2015

  Fatal crashes Injury crashes Property damage-only
crashes
  2006 2015 2006 2015 2006 2015
Passenger cars            
Involved in crashes 24,260 19,534 1,794,000 1,785,000 4,046,000 4,438,000
Rate per 100 million vehicle miles traveled 1.50 1.37 111 126 250 312
Rate per 100,000 registered vehicles 17.70 14.66 1,309 1,340 2,953 3,331
Light trucks (1)            
Involved in crashes 22,411 18,675 1,202,000 1,198,000 2,932,000 3,197,000
Rate per 100 million vehicle miles traveled 1.94 1.37 104 88 254 235
Rate per 100,000 registered vehicles 22.85 14.66 1,225 941 2,990 2,509
Motorcycles            
Involved in crashes 4,963 5,076 84,000 84,000 15,000 13,000
Rate per 100 million vehicle miles traveled 41.19 25.89 694 430 128 66
Rate per 100,000 registered vehicles 74.31 59.02 1,251 980 230 150

(1) Trucks with 10,000 pounds or less gross vehicle weight. Includes pickups, vans, truck-based station wagons and utility vehicles.

Source: U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT), National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). Vehicle miles traveled - USDOT, Federal Highway Administration, revised by NHTSA; Registered passenger cars and light trucks - R.L. Polk & Co; Registered motorcycles - USDOT, Federal Highway Administration.

View Archived Tables

 

 

Persons Killed In Total And Alcohol-Impaired Crashes By Person Type, 2015

 

    Alcohol-impaired driving fatalities (1)
Person type Total killed Number Percent of total killed
Vehicle occupants      
     Driver 17,466 5,909 34%
     Passenger 6,158 1,812 29
     Unknown occupant 71 3 4
     Total 23,695 7,724 33%
Motorcyclists 4,976 1,609 32%
Nonoccupants      
     Pedestrian 5,376 796 15
     Pedalcyclist 818 101 12
     Other/unknown 227 36 16
     Total 6,421 933 15%
Total 35,092 10,265 29%

(1) Alcohol-impaired driving crashes are crashes that involve at least one driver or a motorcycle operator with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08 percent or above, the legal definition of drunk driving.

Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

View Archived Tables

 

 

Drivers In Fatal Crashes By Blood Alcohol Concentration (Bac) And Vehicle Type, 2006-2015 (1)

  Passenger car Light truck Large truck Motorcycles
    Percent    Percent    Percent    Percent 
Year Total BAC =
0.01+
BAC =
0.08+
Total BAC =
0.01+
BAC =
0.08+
Total BAC =
0.01+
BAC =
0.08+
Total BAC =
0.01+
BAC =
0.08+
2006 24,162 27% 23% 22,307 28% 24% 4,729 2% 1% 4,961 34% 26%
2007 22,765 27 23 21,719 27 23 4,601 2 1 5,306 35 27
2008 20,379 27 23 19,095 26 23 4,040 3 2 5,405 36 29
2009 18,344 27 23 17,878 27 23 3,182 3 2 4,601 36 29
2010 17,710 27 24 17,385 25 22 3,456 2 1 4,647 36 28
2011 17,401 27 24 16,706 25 21 3,594 3 1 4,761 37 29
2012 17,992 26 23 17,131 25 22 3,753 3 2 5,075 35 27
2013 17,731 27 23 16,738 25 21 3,858 4 2 4,769 34 27
2014 17,757 26 22 17,017 25 22 3,697 3 2 4,692 36 29
2015 19,413 25 21 18,570 23 20 3,996 2 2 5,071 34 27

(1) NHTSA estimates alcohol involvement when alcohol test results are unknown.

Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Safety Administration.

View Archived Tables

 

Additional resources

Insurance Information Institute, Facts & Statistics: http://www.iii.org/fact-statistic/motorcycle-crashes

Insurance Institute for Highway Safety: http://www.highwaysafety.org                            

U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration: http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov

The Motorcycle Safety Foundation: http://www.msf-usa.org

The Motorcycle Industry Council: http://www.mic.org

Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety: http://www.saferoads.org

© Insurance Information Institute, Inc. - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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